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Badminton rackets

Sun, 2023-10-22 07:49
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Nangmin dong

2 near new rackets. ₩5,000

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Gimhae

Fri, 2023-10-20 19:42
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: Kimhae- Jangyu- Yulha

Looking twice a week. Preferably Tuesday and Friday.  Once a week is okay.  Kindy or Hakwan. Business  etc 010-3120-7766 

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Learn Korean Ep. 129: ~군, ~구나, ~구먼 “Oh my!”

Thu, 2023-10-19 13:48

Keykat says she suddenly wants to change her hair style, but I don't know why. Oh well....

I wanted to make a lesson about ~군, and this video covers 군(요), 구나, 구먼, and 구만 - all of the most common ones. Also the PDF version (below) covers additional ones including ~더군 and more.

Also make sure to get your free PDF version of this lesson (and every lesson in the "Learn Korean" series) by clicking the download link right below this video~!

Click here to download a free PDF of this lesson!

The post Learn Korean Ep. 129: ~군, ~구나, ~구먼 “Oh my!” appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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Philips blender

Thu, 2023-10-19 06:28
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Pukyong National university

Basically new Philips blender.  Very easy to use and wash. 0% BPA

Price: 40.000 won

If you are interested,  please let me know. 

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Living History – Steve Moore (Peace Corps – 1967)

Wed, 2023-10-18 23:19
Steve Moore in front of a Statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva Compassion) at Sudeoksa Temple near Mangong’s (1871-1946) Hut in 1968. (Picture Courtesy of Steve Moore).

One of the great things about running a website about Korean Buddhist temples is that you get to meet a lot of amazing people. And a lot of these amazing people have varying backgrounds, interests, and insights. Rather amazingly, some of these people first visited Korea in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Here are their stories!

1. Where are you originally from? Introduce yourself a little.

I’m originally from the Pacific Northwest, raised and educated in Oregon and Washington. I have a BA in history from the University of Oregon and an MA in East Asian Studies from the University of Washington. I worked for two years after college as a middle school English teacher in Korea with the Peace Corps, followed by four years as a social studies/Korean Culture teacher at DODDS schools in Seoul and Yokohama/Yokosuka.

2. When and why did you first come to Korea?

I first came to Korea in June, 1967 as a Peace Corps volunteer. After 6-weeks training at Yonsei University, I was assigned as an English teacher at a rural middle school.

3. When you first came to Korea what city did you live? Did you subsequently move around?

I lived in the rural farming community of Yesan, Chungcheongnam-do. After one year, I transferred to the city of Cheonan, also in Chungcheongnam-do.

4. What was the first temple you visited in Korea?

During my 6-weeks training at Yonsei, I and a fellow trainee visited Sudeoksa Temple. Coincidentally, I was later assigned to Yesan, which was just a few miles from that temple.

Sudeoksa Temple during Buddha’s Birthday celebrations in 1967. (Picture courtesy of Steve Moore).

5. What drew your interest to Korean Buddhist temples?

As an historian, I was drawn by the history and secondarily by Buddhism, a religion about which I knew next to nothing. I was also interested in the art and architecture of the temples.

6. What is your favourite temple? Why?

Hard to choose since I’ve visited so many over the years, but I guess it would be Bulguksa Temple and Seokguram Grotto; the latter being unique among the temples I’ve visited. One can’t help but be impressed by the scale of Bulguksa Temple and its magnificent façade.

Yesan Middle School staff at Bulguksa Temple in 1967. (Picture courtesy of Steve Moore). Yesan Middle School students with Steve Moore at Bulguksa Temple in front of the Daeung-jeon Hall in 1967, as well. (Picture courtesy of Steve Moore).

7. What temple or hermitage has changed the most from when you were first got here? What has changed about it?

Tough question as nearly all Korean temples have undergone major restoration in the past six decades.  Perhaps Haeinsa Temple has changed the most. In the 60’s and 70’s, despite its historic and cultural significance, it was remote and rather difficult to get to. Becoming part of a national park, it is now easily accessed and thoroughly made visitor friendly, with all of the secondary buildings restored and in some cases rebuilt. A close second might be Jeondeungsa Temple on Ganghwa Island, which was almost as remote as Haeinsa Temple. I visited the temple last fall and found it totally transformed and almost completely unrecognizable. By the way, not only has the government invested a lot in these temples, but Buddhists are now quite rich (and politically influential).

8. What was the most difficult temple to get to? How did you get there?

Haeinsa Temple and Seokguram Grotto. The former accessed by bus up a narrow and sometimes steep dirt road. Seokguram Grotto, on the other hand, required a hike up a direct road at dawn to see (or not) the sunrise on the East Sea.

9. Did you remain in Korea or did you return home?

I stayed in Korea 1967-71 and then returned numerous times over the years, including an assignment in the Foreign Service to the US Embassy in Seoul (1994-97).

Steve Moore in Korea during his time in the country from 1967-71. (Picture courtesy of Steve Moore).—

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Deokjusa Temple – 덕주사 (Jecheon, Chungcheongbuk-do)

Tue, 2023-10-17 23:24
The Bell Pavilion and Mt. Woraksan at Deokjusa Temple in Jecheon, Chungcheongbuk-do. Temple History

Deokjusa Temple is located in Jecheon, Chungcheongbuk-do in the southern foothills of Mt. Woraksan (1,095.3 m) up a long valley. According to legend, Deokjusa Temple was first built in 587 A.D. Additionally, and also according to this legend, Princess Deokju, who was a Silla princess, and one of the children of King Gyeongsun of Silla (r. 927-935 A.D.), built the temple. King Gyeongsun of Silla was the final ruler of the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). King Gyeongsun of Silla was placed on the thrown by Gyeon Hwon (892-934 A.D.), who was the founder of Later Baekje (892–936). When Gyeon Hwon’s army sacked Gyeongju in 927 A.D., they found King Gyeongae of Silla (r. 924-927 A.D.) having a party at Poseokjeong Pavilion. Rather than surrender, the king killed himself. It was only then that Gyeon Hwon placed King Gyeongsun of Silla on the throne in place of the former Silla king. Because of its already weakened state, King Gyeongsun of Silla reigned over a tiny portion of the former Silla lands, until he eventually abdicated his throne in favour of King Taejo of Goryeo in 935 A.D.

Disappointed and devastated by his father’s actions, Crown Prince Maui and his sister Princess Deokju fled to the southern mountains of Jeollanam-do. From here, they would attempt to make their way up to Mt. Geumgangsan to hide. Along the way, Crown Prince Maui, Princess Deokju, and their party came to the present location of where Deokjusa Temple is located on Mt. Woraksan. It was here that they could see the Big Dipper. Finding that the energy of Mt. Woraksan was similar to that of Mt. Geumgangsan, they decided to make the “Rock-Carved Standing Buddha of Deokjusa Temple.” This carving was made to face the “Stone Standing Buddha in Mireuk-ri,” which was purportedly made by Crown Prince Maui. The two are some six kilometres from the other. While the “Rock-Carved Standing Buddha of Deokjusa Temple” faces to the south, the “Stone Standing Buddha in Mireuk-ri” faces the north. It’s said that Princess Deokju spent the rest of her life missing her brother, Crown Prince Maui, who died poor on Mt. Geumgangsan.

Based upon the stone pagoda at the original Deokjusa Temple site, as well as roof tiles that were discovered in the same area, both date back to around the early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). As a result, and based upon this evidence, it’s believed that Deokjusa Temple was actually first founded at this time. Another thing to support this claim are the historical records about Deokjusa Temple. According to these records, the first hall at Deokjusa Temple was built by the monk Gwano (1096-1158). It’s also believed that Deokjusa Temple had a connection to the royal family during the early Goryeo Dynasty, as well.

As early as the Goryeo Dynasty, but definitely by the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the temple was divided into an upper and lower temple that were known as Sangdeokjusa Temple and Hadeokjusa Temple. Additionaly, and based upon historical records, the temple was situated in a strategic location that helped defend and supply the region, as well.

Deokjusa Temple was completely destroyed during the Korean War (1950-53). In 1963, the temple was rebuilt in its current configuration and location to the south of the original temple site by about 1.7 km. Later, and in 1970, the temple was expanded. The “Standing Stone Yaksa Buddha Statue,” which had formerly been located in a different part of Jecheon was relocated and enshrined in the current Yaksa-jeon Hall at Deokjusa Temple. Then in 1998, the Daeungbo-jeon Hall was built. Sadly, part of the temple, once more, was destroyed by fire in 2009. The temple was restored in 2011.

Deokjusa Temple is home to a single Korean Treasure, which is located in the original temple site some 1.7 km from the current temple’s location. This Korean Treasure, which is Korean Treasure #406, is “Rock-carved Standing Buddha of Deokjusa Temple.”

Temple Layout

You first make your way up the long Deokju Valley on your way to the temple. Eventually you’ll come to the temple parking lot, which is located just out in front of the entry to Woraksan National Park. To the left, and then to the right, you’ll make your way up a side-winding road.

The first thing to greet you on the temple grounds is the “Monument with Sanskrit Inscription in Songgye-ri, Jecheon,” which is housed inside a wooden pavilion. This monument is presumed to have been made during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). The large flat stone is inscribed with Sanskrit. Rather interestingly, it’s the only historic monument written in Sanskrit in Korea. The monument is now largely faded. The monument was discovered in 1988 during some road repair work near Songgye Valley. It was subsequently moved to Deokjusa Temple. The Sanskrit inscription is the text from the Surangama Sutra (The Sutra of the Heroic One), or “Daebuljeongsuneungeomgyeong – 대불정수능엄경” or simply “Neungeomgyeong – 능엄경” in Korean. In total, there are 105 Sanskrit letters on the monument. “Monument with Sanskrit Inscription in Songgye-ri, Jecheon” is Chungcheongbuk-do Tangible Cultural Heritage #231.

To the left of the “Monument with Sanskrit Inscription in Songgye-ri, Jecheon” wooden pavilion is a rather atypical open pavilion dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). This slightly elevated open wooden pavilion is the temple’s Sanshin-gak Hall. Like the Sanshin-gak Hall itself, the image inside this pavilion is rather atypical, as well. The stone relief of Sanshin is wedged between two large mountain rocks.

To the right of both of these structures is the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to the main hall are adorned with a variety of murals that include the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals), the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life), Wonhyo-daesa and Uisang-daesa, and Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). Stepping inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, you’ll find a large triad of statues on the main altar. In the centre rests Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy). This central image is joined on either side by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) and Nosana-bul (The Perfect Body Buddha). Also housed inside the main hall is a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

Directly in front of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall is the Jong-ru Pavilion that houses a solitary bronze bell. It’s not too large or small, but it seems to perfectly fit the wooden pavilion that it’s housed in. And to the left of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall is a baby Buddha statue, as well as a deck that looks out on the neighbouring mountains.

Beyond the Jong-ru Pavilion, and down a pathway, you’ll find a second temple courtyard. Between the first and second temple courtyard, and looking down, you’ll notice a modern stone statue dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha). The first of the two structures in the second temple courtyard is a wooden pavilion that houses the “Stone Standing Bhaisajyaguru Buddha of Deokjusa Temple,” which is Chungcheongbuk-do Tangible Cultural Heritage #196. This statue is presumed to have first been made during the Goryeo Dynasty. The statue of Yaksayeorae-bul holds a medicine bowl in its left hand. The statue was originally discovered at the Jeonggeumsa-ji Temple Site. The head of the Buddha is disproportionately larger than the rest of its body. And the folds on the Buddha’s robe are softly carved. Overall, except for the lower part of the statue, it’s been well-preserved.

To the right of this pavilion is the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with murals dedicated to the Bodhidharma, the moktak tale, and other various Buddhist themed murals. Stepping inside the Gwaneum-jeon Hall, you’ll find an image of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) on the main altar joined by two statues of female lions.

Finally, and 1.7 km away and up a hiking trail, is the “Rock-Carved Standing Buddha of Deokjusa Temple.” The large statue, which is carved on the southern part of a granite wall, stands 13 metres in height. The face is carved so as to stick out from the rock face, while the body is carved in simple lines. The relief has a chubby face with elongated eyes, a large nose, and a hanging chin. This exaggerated design is common of large Buddha statues and reliefs from the Goryeo Dynasty. This relief was made during the early Goryeo Dynasty, possibly as early as the eleventh century. This is the only Korean Treasure at Deokjusa Temple.

How To Get There

From the Jecheon Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #982 or Bus #980. After 81 stops, yes 81 stops, or one hour and forty minutes, you’ll need to get off at the “Deokju-gol – 덕주골” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk about 20 minutes, or 1.3 km, to get to Deokjusa Temple.

Overall Rating: 7/10

Deokjusa Temple is beautifully located on Mt. Woraksan. In addition to all of this natural beauty, have a look inside the three wooden pavilions at Deojusa Temple. They house a beautiful Goryeo-era statue of Yaksayeorae-bul, the only historical monument with Sanskrit writing on it, as well as the rather atypical Sanshin-gak Hall. The artwork inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall is beautiful, as is the artwork that adorns both the exterior of the main hall and the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. But the main highlight to Deokjusa Temple is the mountainside “Rock-Carved Standing Buddha of Deokjusa Temple” that’s located some 1.7 km from the modern location of the temple; however, it’s well worth the hike.

Mt. Woraksan off in the distance. The wooden pavilion that houses the “Monument with Sanskrit Inscription in Songgye-ri, Jecheon.” A look at the “Monument with Sanskrit Inscription in Songgye-ri, Jecheon.” The Sanshin-gak Hall at Deokjusa Temple. The stone relief dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). The Daeungbo-jeon Hall at Deokjusa Temple. One of the Palsang-do murals that adorns the main hall. The bronze bell inside the Jong-ru Pavilion. The baby Buddha with Mt. Woraksan in the background. The “Stone Standing Bhaisajyaguru Buddha of Deokjusa Temple.” The Gwaneum-jeon Hall (left). The Bodhidharma painting that adorns the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. The “Rock-Carved Standing Buddha of Deokjusa Temple.” (Picture courtesy of CHA).
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IELTS /TOEFL iBT /PTE Academic Expert Preparation on Zoom

Mon, 2023-10-16 17:23
Location: Business/Organization Type: 

Secure success in your immigration, professional registration or university admission process with  IELTS / TOEFL iBT /PTE Academic expert training. 

Flexible schedules. Individual basis. Results of past exam takers provided for verification. Trial lesson.

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This doesn't mean what you think it means (~수가 있어야죠) | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2023-10-16 15:10

An idiom you should be aware of if you're at least Intermediate level or above is ~수가 있어야죠.

This idiom is used as-is, and there are some specifics you should know to use it which I explain in today's video.

The post This doesn't mean what you think it means (~수가 있어야죠) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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Gamsansa Temple – 감산사 (Gyeongju)

Sun, 2023-10-15 23:45
The Sanshin-gak Hall at Gamsansa Temple in Gyeongju. Temple History

Gamsansa Temple, which means “Sweet Mountain Temple” in English, is located about two kilometres to the south of the famed Bulguksa Temple on Mt. Tohamsan (745.7 m) in eastern Gyeongju. According to the inscriptions found on the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” and the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple,” both of which are National Treasures, Gamsansa Temple was first built on “‘Nirvana Day’ (February 15th) in the eighteenth year of King Seongdeok of Silla (r. 702-737 A.D.).” Based on this information, Gamsansa Temple was first established in 719 A.D.

As to who first commissioned the construction of Gamsansa Temple, it was Kim Jiseong (651-720 A.D.). Kim Jiseong was a high-ranking Silla official. Officially, Kim Jiseong was a “Jungachan,” which was the sixth-highest rank of the seventeen ranks of the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. -935 A.D.). In 705 A.D., Kim traveled to the Tang Dynasty (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) as part of a Silla mission. The inscriptions of the two previously mentioned National Treasures, which were also commissioned in 719 A.D., Kim held the rank of “Sangsa,” which was probably a title he received from the Tang Dynasty court. Upon his return to the Korean Peninsula, Kim resigned from government service in 718 A.D. at the age of sixty-seven. In retirement, Kim found peace and solitude, which allowed him to purse an in-depth study of the Buddha’s teachings. In particular, Kim studied the Yogacarabhumi-sastra (Treatise on the Foundation for Yoga Practitioners) by Asanga (fl. 4th century A.D.). By 719, Kim Jiseong donated his fortune and his land to build Gamsansa Temple. By building Gamsansa Temple, Kim hoped that that his devotion would move the Buddha to bring peace to his deceased parents (Il Gilgan and Gwan Chori), as well as protect the Silla king and his royal family. But in 720 A.D., and at the age of sixty-nine, Kim would die.

From the time of its construction, and up until 1915, very little is known about the history of Gamsansa Temple. In 1915, during Japanese Colonial Rule, the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” and the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple” were discovered on the temple site. These two statues are now housed at the National Museum of Korea because for the longest time there simply wasn’t a temple at the Gamsansa Temple site. It is only over the past couple of decades that Gamsansa Temple was rebuilt.

In total, Gamsansa Temple was home to two National Treasures. They were the the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” and the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple.” The “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” is National Treasure #81, while the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple” is National Treasure #82. As was previously mentioned, these two statues are now housed in Seoul at the National Museum of Korea. In addition to these two National Treasures, Gamsansa Temple is currently the home to a Tangible Cultural Heritage, which is the “Seated Stone Vairocana Statue at Gamsansa Temple,” as well as the “Three Storied Stone Pagoda of Gamsansa Site,” which is a Cultural Properties Materials.

The “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple” in Seoul at the Choson Industrial Exhibition in 1915. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). And the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” in Seoul at the Choson Industrial Exhibition in 1915. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple Layout

You first approach the modern Gamsansa Temple from the northern temple parking lot. Heading south, you’ll find the Boje-ru Pavilion to the east. The first story of the structure acts as an entry to the rest of the temple grounds including the main temple courtyard. The second story of the structure is used for larger dharma talks. This large entry gate is beautifully adorned with vibrant dancheong colours.

Stepping into the main temple courtyard, you’ll find a three-story pagoda in the centre of the temple courtyard. To the right rear of this three-story pagoda is a small, crooked wooden pavilion that looks out onto neighbouring Gyeongju. There are also planters in this area with beautiful lotus flowers growing in them, as well as a more modern stone statue dedicated to Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy) on a large boulder.

Beyond the three-story pagoda, but before arriving at the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, you’ll find a stone fountain with an image of a child-like monk at its centre. Making your way up to the main hall, you’ll find two stylized stone lions book-ending the stone stairs that lead up to the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals), while the eaves are adorned with both dancheong and images of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas.

Stepping inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, you’ll find the “Seated Stone Vairocana Statue at Gamsansa Temple.” It’s believed that this image of Birojana-bul dates back to the 8th century (around the time of the temple’s founding), which makes it one of the oldest extant images of this Buddha in Korea. The statue was missing its original nimbus and pedestal, and the current nimbus and pesdestal were added more recently. Additionally, the head and side of the statue were also damaged and later repaired. As a result, it’s difficult to determine what the statue originally looked like because of the extensive damage on the statue throughout the centuries. Currently, Birojana-bul is seated with its legs crossed and with knees wide apart. And mudra (ritualized hand gesture) that the statue is making of the “Wisdom Fist,” which is typical of Birojana-bul. The “Seated Stone Vairocana Statue at Gamsansa Temple” is a Tangible Cultural Heritage.

To the left of the main altar is a painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Aftelife), as well as a picture of the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple.” And to the right of the main altar you’ll find a large Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural), as well as a picture of the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple.”

To the rear of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall is the “Three Storied Stone Pagoda of Gamsansa Site.” Over a small bridge and in an open field is the Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) pagoda. In 1965, the pagoda was reconstructed. The pagoda now stands 3.3 metres in height. The lower part of the base consists of four stones. As for the upper part of the base, there are pillars carved on both the corners and centres of the four sides. The pagoda is partially damaged with both the second and third body stones missing.

To the left of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall and the “Three Storied Stone Pagoda of Gamsansa Site” are the living quarters and administrative office at Gamsansa Temple. And to the immediate right of the main hall, you’ll find the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this building are adorned with murals of the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld) and the realms that they rule over. Stepping inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find a stone statue of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) on the main altar. To the right and left of the main altar are a twin pair of paintings with hundreds of smaller images of Amita-bul. And on the far right wall, you’ll find a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

And to the left of the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find the diminutive Sanshin-gak Hall. Instead of being able to step inside the shaman shrine hall, visitors need to worship outside the shrine. The painting housed inside the Sanshin-gak Hall is a modern interpretation of the classic Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) painting found inside the Jungakdan Shrine in Gyeryongsan Mountain at Sinwonsa Temple in Gongju, Chungcheongnam-do. Standing next to the image of Sanshin is a quizzical tiger that looks up at the branch of a tree that has a magpie perched upon it.

Out in front of the Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll find the stone artifacts from the historic Gamsansa Temple. And to the south of these stone artifacts, you’ll a large pond with a pagoda at its centre, as well as a building for the Temple Stay program at Gamsansa Temple.

The “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple” (right) and the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” (left). (Picture courtesy of the CHA). The Statues of Gamsansa Temple

There are two statues that once resided at Gamsansa Temple that are now housed in the National Museum of Korea in Seoul. They are the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” and the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple.” Both were commissioned together in 719 A.D. by Kim Jiseong (the founder of Gamsansa Temple). The Maitreya (Mireuk-bul, the Future Buddha) was commissioned for Kim’s mother, while the Amitabha (Amita-bul, the Buddha of the Western Paradise) was commissioned for Kim’s father.

According to the inscriptions on the statues, which allows us to know for whom the statues were originally commissioned, we can glean even more information about their origins. The inscriptions also record how the ashes to Kim’s mother (who died at the age of sixty-six) and father (who died at the age of forty-seven) were scattered by the shore of Heunji (欣支) on the East Sea. Additionally, we learn that the statues were made to wish for the longevity and fortune of the king and for Kim Gaewon Ichan (the son of King Muyeol of Silla). Kim Jiseong, and based on the inscriptions on the statues, also hoped that his brothers, sisters, his wives, and all sentient beings of the world to attain Buddhahood. And these inscriptions were later quoted by the Samguk Yusa, Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms in English, during the 13th century.

A rather interesting feature of the statues is that the inscriptions have notable differences in their writing style. Examples of this can be seen in the inscription on the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple” which uses the honourific terms when referring to Kim Jiseong. It also states that the inscription was composed by Nama Chong by the king’s orders and then transcribed by the monk Gyeongyung and Kim Chiwon. Also, the final line of this inscription on the Amita-bul statue details how Kim Jiseong died on April 22, 720 A.D. at the age of sixty-nine. The Maitreya statue is absent of this detail; therefore, it’s believed that the statue dedicated to Amita-bul was completed after Kim’s death, while the Mireuk-bul statue was completed during his lifetime.

As for the style of the two statues, they are important because they demonstrate the Buddhist sculpture style of Unified Silla that developed in the eighth century. Some of these distinguishing features are the thick eyelids and wide face. Also, despite their large size and weight, the two statues still exude a sense of serenity. However, the three-dimensional quality that will later develop by the mid-eight century as exemplified by the contents of Seokguram Grotto have yet to realized. Overall, though, the two statues from Gamsansa Temple display a delicate piouness. And the work are more refined in style than their predecessors in Silla Buddhist art.

The “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple.” (Picture courtesy of the CHA). The “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple.” (Picture courtesy of the CHA).

More specifically, the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple,” which is the newer of the two, is more immense than the “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple.” The statue stands 2.57 metres in height. The Mireuk-bul (Future Buddha) statue is adorned with a variety of exotic clothing and jewelry, including an ornate crown, double necklaces, and a long ornamental cloth hanging down the chest and arms. Additionally, a carved ornate bracelet appears on its arms, and a skirt is folded around its waist and decorated with jewels. The clothing and acessories follow the overall tradition of this time in East Asian Buddhist artistry.

However, while the statue follows in the tradition of Buddhist artwork from the Tang Dynasty and the eleven-faced Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva (Gwanseeum-bosal, the Bodhisattva of Compassion) from Japan’s Horyuji Temple, it also has distinct features all of their own. Examples of this uniqueness are found in the standing pose and crown with a tiny Bodhisattva that appears to be Gwanseeum-bosal in it. Additionally, and according to the 13th century Samguk Yusa, or the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms in English, documents how the “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” was the “Maitreya Bodhisattva, the deity for the main hall of the temple.” With this knowledge, we can assume that Mireuk-bul was prominent at Gamsansa Temple and Silla society as a whole. The “Stone Standing Maitreya Bodhisattva of Gamsansa Temple” is National Treasure #81

The “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple,” on the other hand, stands 1.74 metres in height. This statue, of the two, is assumed to be the older of the two, wears an outer robe that covers both shoulders. This robe has creases that ripple symmetrically downward. The robe clearly expresses the shape of the body of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Rather remarkably, the statue resembles the south side of the four-sided stone at Gulbulsa-ji Temple Site. Both images are similar in style of Buddhist sculptures from the Tang Dynasty, which originated from India. And it’s this style that finds a home in Silla from Tang and the monks that made pilgrimages back and forth from the two nations. The “Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple” is National Treasure #82.

How To Get There

From the Gyeongju Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #607 or Bus #605 and get off at the “Bamgat – 밤갖” bus stop. The ride will last about 40 minutes, or 33 stops. And from where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk 1.8 km, or 26 minutes, to get to Gamsansa Temple.

And if public transportation isn’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Gyeongju Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride will take about 30 minutes, and it’ll cost you 22,500 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 7/10

Let’s be honest, Gamsansa Temple would be even more special if it still housed the two National Treasures now at the Korean National Museum in Seoul. But with that being said, it still has a couple remnants from its past in the form of the “Seated Stone Vairocana Statue at Gamsansa Temple” inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall and the “Three Storied Stone Pagoda of Gamsansa Site” behind the main hall. In addition to these two relgious artifacts, other things to enjoy at Gamsansa Temple is the painting inside the diminutive Sanshin-gak Hall and the artwork inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. Overall, Gamsansa Temple, while newer in construction, still has a historic feel to it, as well.

Passing under the Boje-ru Pavilion and looking towards the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. A statue of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy) that rests atop a large boulder with the main hall in the background. The Boje-ru Pavilion and the three-story pagoda in the main temple courtyard at Gamsansa Temple. A look up at the front of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. One of the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals) that adorns the exterior walls of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall with the “Seated Stone Vairocana Statue at Gamsansa Temple” front and centre. The Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) mural inside the main hall. And the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, as well. The Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall from the rear with the “Three Storied Stone Pagoda of Gamsansa Site” in the foreground. The Geukrak-jeon Hall at Gamsansa Temple. One of the underworld murals that adorns the exterior walls of the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall with a stone statue of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) front and centre. An incredible mural dedicated to Amita-bul inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, as well. The stone remnants of the historic Gamsansa Temple. The mural dedicated to the Mountain Spirit that hangs inside the Sanshin-gak Hall. And a purple lotus flower that was in full bloom, when I visited the temple.
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Online Engllish Teacher

Thu, 2023-10-12 21:37
Location: Business/Organization Type: 

Online English Teacher Available.

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Please review my resume for the online teaching job.

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Available now - SEE RESUME PLS.

 

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The Truth About Learning Multiple Languages at Once

Thu, 2023-10-12 15:50

Over the years I've heard of people learning multiple languages at once, including Korean. While there are some downsides, this is more common than you may think. For example, there are thousands of people who are learning Korean every day through English, but whose native language is not English. In these cases, what should you know before trying this? Are there any major downsides to be aware of? Are there any benefits? I met with Hyunwoo and we discussed our experiences learning multiple languages, and what we'd recommend to others who are in this situation.

The post The Truth About Learning Multiple Languages at Once appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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SoYoon K-POP Dance Class at 1Million Dance Studio

Thu, 2023-10-12 11:50

Get ready for a thrilling K-Pop dance event with SoYoon. Join us for an unforgettable day of dance, energy, and entertainment as this talented dancer and choreographer takes the stage.

  • Date: Saturday, October 28th
  • Time: 1:00 PM
  • Duration: 80 minutes of non-stop dancing excitement
  • Location: 1MILLION Dance Studio, 1st Floor Main Hall

SoYoon (조수연), the leader of Our Texture Crew, is a choreographer affiliated with 1Million Dance Studio and brings a wealth of experience to the stage. With a diverse background, including choreography for the Hahoe Mask Museum in Andong, representing the Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism in Austria's 'ORF' program, and dancing with K-Pop stars like MAMAMOO and EXO's Kai, SoYoon is sure to captivate you with her talent and expertise.

The event will feature a mesmerizing performance set to the song "LE SSERAFIM - Unforgiven," and an opportunity for you to dance along and learn from SoYoon.

Whether you're a dedicated K-Pop enthusiast or just looking for a fun way to spend your Saturday afternoon, this event promises to be an unforgettable experience. So, grab your dancing shoes, invite your friends, and come join us for an incredible day of K-Pop dance at its finest.

Book your tickets now and be a part of the K-Pop dance extravaganza with SoYoon that you won't want to miss!

Tickets Website: Eventbrite

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Pot Plants for Sale

Thu, 2023-10-12 01:11
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Suyeong

I'm downsizing my apartment and preparing to leave the country for a few months and I need to re-home these plants. Prices are in the photos. Pick up is available at Suyeong station, exit 14.

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Living History – Wayne Kelly (Exchange Student – 1971)

Wed, 2023-10-11 23:17
A Temple Abbot from 1973. (Picture Courtesy of Wayne Kelly).

One of the great things about running a website about Korean Buddhist temples is that you get to meet a lot of amazing people. And a lot of these amazing people have varying backgrounds, interests, and insights. Rather amazingly, some of these people first visited Korea in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Here are their stories!

1. Where are you originally from? Introduce yourself a little.

I’m a U.S. citizen but spent most of my childhood in Europe and much of my adult life in Asia.

2. When and why did you first come to Korea?

I arrived as an exchange student in late October, 1971. I was blessed to stumble into Korea at just the right time. Few spoke English, and fewer still had traveled outside the country. A peculiar guest in an enigmatic land, I entered an austere and sheltered society—insular and known for being so. The society that greeted me was warmer then. A kinder, people-centered milieu.

3. When you first came to Korea what city did you live? Did you subsequently move around?

I have only ever lived in Seoul, but I have visited all of the major cities and most of the minor ones on the peninsula. I was also an avid trekker in the 1970s and crisscrossed many of the mountain ranges. (Mt. Taebaeksan Sanmaek was my favorite.)  

4. What was the first temple you visited in Korea?

The first one I can recall by name was Bomunsa Temple on Seongmo-do Island.

5. What drew your interest to Korean Buddhist temples? (Buddhism, architecture, art, history, etc)

Acquainting myself with Buddhism without plans to do so was like jumping into the ocean without knowing how to swim. I wanted to know what it was and what the monks did and why. The skeptic in me said it was all a bunch of hooey. But my soul knew I had stumbled upon an opportunity to do something about my spiritual apathy. Here is a bit more of that backstory: A monk states the obvious to a troubled American.

6. What is your favourite temple? Why?

I am a bit partial to Hwagyesa Temple because that’s where I did a summer Gyeolchae retreat, and where I met Seungsahn Daeseonsa-nim (1927-2004).  

7. What temple or hermitage has changed the most from when you were first got here? What has changed about it?

Most temples have changed quite a bit as far as size and condition of facilities. When I first arrived, many were dilapidated and poverty-stricken. Much like most of the rest of Korea.   

8. What was the most difficult temple to get to? How did you get there?

Again, other than those in or near the cities, many of the temples/hermitages were difficult to access due to lack of infrastructure and travel conditions. Once you left the city, most of Korea’s roads were unpaved and in poor condition.  

9. Did you remain in Korea or did you return home?

Other than the years of my deportation during the Park regime (1962-79), I lived in Korea continuously for a total of over 25 years. I still regret my departure in 2001 due to family issues. 

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Thinking 생각하다 | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2023-10-11 16:31

To say "to think" requires knowing the Plain Form, and using it together with ~고 and the verb 생각하다. This form is different than using the 것 같다 form we learned previously, which also means "to think." In this lesson I summarize when and where to use both forms.

The post Thinking 생각하다 | Live Class Abridged appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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Yeolam-gok Valley on Mt. Namsan – 열암곡 (Gyeongju)

Tue, 2023-10-10 00:48
The “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” Valley Layout

The Yeolam-gok Valley is located on the southeastern side of Mt. Namsan (495.1 m) in Gyeongju. The Yeolam-gok Valley is probably one of the least traveled portions of Mt. Namsan, especially when you consider that the mountain is home to such highlights as Chilbulam Hermitage, the Samreung Valley on the west side of the mountain, Bucheobawi, Sambulsa Temple, the Yongjangsa-ji Temple Site, and numerous other sites. In fact, Mt. Namsan is home to some 122 temples and temple sites, 53 stone statues, 64 pagodas, 16 stone lanterns, 36 monuments, royal tombs and even a fortress. Of this total number, two of these amazing sites can be found in the Yeolam-gok Valley.

From the southern parking lot of Mt. Namsan, which belongs to the Gyeongju National Park, you’ll make your way up an 800 metre long trail. Eventually, you’ll come to a clearing to your right where you’ll find the “Stone Seated Buddha in Yeolam-gok Valley” and the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” To gain access to this clearing, you’ll need to head north for about 50 metres. Eventually, you’ll find a pathway that leads you into this clearing.

In May 2007, a seated Buddha statue in Yeolam-gok Valley in the southern part of Mt. Namsan was discovered while the Gyeongju National Research Institute of the Cultural Heritage Administration, which is in charge of protecting and promoting Korean cultural heritage in Gyeongju, was repairing the neighboring “Stone Seated Buddha in Yeolam-gok Valley.” Imagine the surprise of the person who discovered this massive 70-ton, 6.2-metre-tall high-relief image of the Buddha. What’s even more surprising about this high-relief image is that it was discovered in a fallen position perfectly preserved coming to rest some 10 centimetres from having its entire face destroyed by the rocky ground below.

As to how the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” first came to fall, it was surmised that the statue was toppled by an earthquake. The Korean Peninsula is considered a stable location in comparison to neighboring countries like Taiwan and Japan. However, according to historical records, this certainly doesn’t preclude the Korean Peninsula from having its fair share of earthquakes. In fact, according to several historical texts like the Samguk Sagi, or “History of the Three Kingdoms” in English, there have been several destructive earthquakes in the region like those in 768 A.D., 779 A.D. and 1036. The last two earthquakes were especially destructive causing severe damage to historical sites like the famed Hwangnyongsa Temple pagoda and Bulguksa Temple, both of which are also located in Gyeongju. In fact, the 779 A.D. earthquake is well-documented in the Samguk Sagi. In this book, the destruction caused by this earthquake is described as, “About 100 people are killed and a number of buildings are destroyed by the earthquake.” It’s believed that this earthquake had a magnitude of 6.7 on the Richter scale.

Based upon the initial studies of the Yeolam-gok-ji Temple Site, it was determined that the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” fell between 1130 and 1370. What’s peculiar about this time frame is that no major earthquake is recorded to have taken place at this time. However, further studies have revealed that the earthquake that detached the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” from its rock face had a 6.4 magnitude and hit the region in 1430. This then resulted in the statue falling and rotating 20 degrees clockwise and sliding several meters from its original position. Eventually, it would come to rest on a 45-degree slope some 800 metres up the Yeolam-gok Valley, miraculously still intact. And because of the way it fell, it had been perfectly preserved some 10 centimetres from the rocky ground.

As for the artistic style of the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley,” it goes a long way in determining just how old it might be. Things that are typically considered are the carving style, the facial features and the clothing depicted when determining the age of a statue or relief. All three together help formulate a date for the relief’s construction. And with all this in mind, the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” was determined to have been first constructed around the late eighth century.

To further emphasize this destructive point of the earthquakes in the region, the previously mentioned “Stone Seated Buddha in Yeolam-gok Valley” was also completely destroyed by an earthquake. This statue is located some 20 metres to the north of the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” The stone seated statue of the Buddha is about three metres in height, and it dates back to around the eighth or ninth century, which is around the same time that the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” is thought to have been first constructed. In 2005, some two years before the discovery of the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley,” the head of the statue was located in the lower part of the valley. And after the head was rediscovered, the rest of the statue, nimbus and pedestal stone that had fragmented upon their falls, were placed upon a newly built pedestal. While the “Stone Seated Buddha in Yeolam-gok Valley” isn’t as perfectly preserved as the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley,” both are now together, once more, on the Yeolamgok-ji Temple Site.

What makes this situation and this newly discovered high-relief even more interesting is the proposal to have it re-erected. The Jogye-jong Order, which is the largest Buddhist order in Korea, announced in January, 2023 that it had the intention of resurrecting the newly discovered treasure. The Gyeongju National Research Institute will be in charge of this project, which is expected to be completed sometime in 2025. But before this can be done, continued examination of the site, as well as numerous computer simulations, need to be completed in order to locate the perfect new location for the resurrected statue so as to avoid its former fate. The one major hitch is that a statue of such size and enormity has never been moved before, and the statue already displays some signs of cracking from its original fall.

How To Get There

You’ll first need to take a taxi from the Gyeongju Intercity Bus Terminal to the southern parking lot of the Gyeongju National Park for the Yeolam-gok Valley. The taxi ride should take about 20 minutes, or 17 km, and it’ll cost you around 20,000 won (one way). From the northern part of the upper parking lot, you’ll see a trailhead with a brown trail marker that reads “Seated Stone Buddha Statue of Yeoramgok.” Follow this trail for 800 metres until you come to the clearing that houses both the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” and the “Stone Seated Buddha in Yeolam-gok Valley.”

Overall Rating: 6/10

The “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” is definitely one of the more peculiar things you’ll find anywhere in Korea. Just ten centimetres of space spared us this beautiful treasure. And for now, it remains tipped over; however, it appears as though it won’t stay this way for much longer. So if you want to see something a little different, and alongside the “Seated Stone Buddha Statue of Yeolam-gok,” you definitely need to make your way up the south side of Mt. Namsan and the Yeolam-gok Valley. It’s definitely one of the underappreciated places on Mt. Namsan in Gyeongju.

The brown trail marker at the head of the trail leading up the Yeolam-gok Valley. Part of the 800 metre long trail leading up the Yeolam-gok Valley. The protective barrier above the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” The “Seated Stone Buddha Statue of Yeolam-gok” (right) and the protective barrier to the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley” (left). The “Seated Stone Buddha Statue of Yeolam-gok.” From the front. And a close-up of the “Seated Stone Buddha Statue of Yeolam-gok.” The protective barrier over top of the  “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” The backside of the 70-ton, 6.2-metre-tall high-relief image of the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” The toppled “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” An even closer look at the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.” And a computer image of the “Maae-bul in Yeolam-gok Valley.”
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Surfing at Seongjeong beach Busan

Sat, 2023-10-07 14:11

Surfing at Seongjeong beach Busan. Surfing with Liam #roadfreelife #ulsan #sup We spent the afternoon at Seongjeong beach mocking about on the SUP board. It was super fun and I would go out every single weekend, if I could. Seriously. Good times.

Liv'in' Korea Crypto Father

 

 

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Speaking Korean With My Bilingual Son at the Korean Folk Village

Thu, 2023-10-05 14:49

Recently my 7 year old son and I visited the Korean Folk Village, known as 한국민속촌, which is located near Suwon in Korea. This time we took a tour around the village and spoke together in Korean, and show you what it's like if you visit there. (This was not a sponsored video.)

The post Speaking Korean With My Bilingual Son at the Korean Folk Village appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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GoWithGuide

Thu, 2023-10-05 10:05
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://gowithguide.com/korea/seoul

At GoWithGuide Seoul, we are a team of dedicated travel enthusiasts passionate about showcasing the beauty, culture, and history of Seoul. Our local experts have a deep-rooted love for this incredible city and are committed to providing travelers with authentic experiences that leave a lasting impact.

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