Koreabridge

Subscribe to Koreabridge feed
Updated: 2 hours 53 min ago

September Update: What is your Covid Vaccine status NOW?

Tue, 2021-09-07 11:22
Choices Fully Vaccinated Got first shot, scheduled for second Scheduled for first shot Waiting to schedule first shot Not sure if I'll get vaccinated Will definitely NOT get vaccinated Details: 

Previous poll (Aug. 10~ Sept.6) at:  https://koreabridge.net/poll/what-your-current-covid-vaccine-status

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Dabosa Temple – 다보사 (Naju, Jeollanam-do)

Mon, 2021-09-06 23:33
The Jong-ru (Bell Pavilion) at Dabosa Temple in Naju, Jeollanam-do. Temple History

Dabosa Temple is located on Mt. Geumseongsan (453.3 m) in Naju, Jeollanam-do. It’s believed that Dabosa Temple was first built in 661 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). However, another legend states that Dabosa Temple was in fact founded by a monk who was meditating on Mt. Geumseongsan after he had a dream that a large pagoda decorated with the seven treasures rose from the ground and Daboyeorae-bul (Abundant Treasures Buddha), or Prabhutaratna in Sanskrit, appeared from the pagoda. Dabosa Temple means “Abundant Treasures Temple” in English.

The temple is believed to have been rebuilt in 1184 during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) by another famed monk, Jinul (1158-1210). And in 1594, the temple was rebuilt, once more, by yet another famous monk; this time, it was rebuilt by Seosan-daesa (1520-1604).

Dabosa Temple is located in a deep valley between the peaks of Odobong Peak and Dabokbong Peak. The temple is surrounded by thick mountain forests. The current temple buildings date back to the 19th century. Specifically, the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, and the Chilseong-gak Hall were all rebuilt between 1878 to 1881. The current Dabosa Temple Daeung-jeon Hall was originally located in the nearby temple called Sillosa Temple. However, the Daeung-jeon Hall was moved to Dabosa Temple when Sillosa Temple was closed. During the Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-1945), the Daeung-jeon Hall at Dabosa Temple was used as a famous training place.

Dabosa Temple is home to a pair of Korean Treasures. They are the Hanging Painting of Dabosa Temple, which is Korean Treasure #1343. The other Korean Treasure is the Wooden Sakyamuni Buddha Triad and Clay Sixteen Seated Arhats of Dabosa Temple, which is Korean Treasure #1834. Additionally, the Daeung-jeon Hall is Jeollanam-do Cultural Heritage Material #87. And the Wooden Statues of Ksitigarbha Triad and the Ten Underworld Kings are Jeollanam-do Tangible Cultural Heritage #310.

Temple Layout

Dabosa Temple is located up a long valley; but before you turn to the left at the bend in the road, and near the mountain trail parking lot, you’ll see the old, unpainted Iljumun Gate that once showed the temple boundary. Now, it’s located about two hundred metres away from the main temple grounds at Dabosa Temple.

Finally approaching the main temple grounds, and making your way to the temple parking lot, you’ll first be welcomed by Dabosa Temple’s rather imposing four-story Haseong-dang Hall. This hall acts as the study halls, visitors centre, and administrative office. The fourth floor of the structure, which is the most traditional of the structure, and is also on the same level as the lower temple courtyard, is the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. It’s a bit tucked away, so even I missed it on my visit to Dabosa Temple.

To the left of the Haseong-dang Hall and the Cheonbul-jeon Hall is the Geumgangmun Gate at Dabosa Temple. Up a bit of an incline, you’ll be welcomed by this newly painted entry gate. Housed inside the Geumgangmun Gate are two standing statues dedicated to Narayeon Geumgang and Miljeok Geumgang – 나라연 금강 & 밀적 금강. You’ll also find two seated youthful images, one dedicated to Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and the other dedicated to Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). Bohyeon-bosal is riding the multi-tusked elephant to the left, while Munsu-bosal is riding the blue haetae to your right.

Having passed through the Geumgangmun Gate, and still making your way up the incline, you’ll turn to your right and enter the lower courtyard at Dabosa Temple. First up is the beautifully adorned Jong-ru (Bell Pavilion), which has a beautiful bronze Brahma bell housed inside it. Straight ahead of you is the historic Daeung-jeon Hall. Rather uniquely, the exterior walls of the Daeung-jeon Hall are adorned with fading white murals of pagodas. These paintings obviously harken back to the temple creation story and Daboyeorae-bul. At the front of the entry, which is a peculiar feature rarely seen at a Daeung-jeon Hall, is a railing and wood flooring. The wooden latticework adorning the front doors of the Daeung-jeon Hall are those of chrysanthemums, apricot flowers, and peonies. Stepping inside the main hall, you’ll be greeted by a triad of large statues. In the centre rests Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). And this statue is joined on either side by Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha) and Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Hanging on the left wall is the temple’s Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). And on the far right wall is a mural dedicated to the Buddhist Three Jewels.

To the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to the Myeongbu-jeon Hall are adorned with simplified dancheong colours. As for the interior, you’ll notice a green haired image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) on the main altar. And this statue is joined on either side by the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld). Both Jijang-bosal and the Siwang are Jeollanam-do Tangible Cultural Heritage #310, and they date back to 1659. In total, there are twenty-two of these historic statues housed inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, and they were made by nine monk-sculptors. They were later repaired in 1903. Completing the interior of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall are ten murals hanging above the heads of the Siwang statues. The murals depict the Underworld that each of the ten Siwang rule over.

Joining the Daeung-jeon Hall and the Myeongbu-jeon Hall in the lower courtyard are the monks’ residence and the upper body of a historic pagoda. Sadly, only the upper two stories of the pagoda still exist.

To the rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall, and up a flight of stairs, is the Chilseong-gak Hall in the upper courtyard. Housed inside this shaman shrine hall are three murals. In the centre hangs a more modern mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). To the left of this modern mural hangs an older mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), who is joined in this mural by a tiger with its mouth wide open. The final mural in the set of three, and hanging on the far right wall, is the mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). Of the set, it’s the Dokseong mural that stands out. In the mural, Dokseong sits upon a golden chair. And both his finger and toe nails are rather long, which only adds to the overall age of Dokseong.

The final temple shrine hall that visitors can explore at Dabosa Temple is the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, which is up another flight of stairs to the left of the Chilseong-gak Hall. The exterior walls are similar to the dancheong colours that adorn the Myeongbu-jeon Hall at Dabosa Temple; but it’s the interior, with its Wooden Sakyamuni Buddha Triad and Clay Sixteen Seated Arhats of Dabosa Temple that’s the star. This collection of statues were first made in 1625, and they’re Korean Treasure #1834. There was a team of sculptors that created these statues that was led by the monk Suyeon. He was a leading Buddhist sculpture during the early part of the 17th century. Inside the statues, written prayers were found. Not only were there prayers, but the age of the statues and the names of the sculptures were also contained inside it, as well as the patrons that sponsored the production of the statues. The nineteen statues are masterfully designed, and the Nahan statues are colourful in their overall composition.

One thing that visitors can’t see at Dabosa Temple, but is a Korean Treasure nonetheless, is the Hanging Painting of Dabosa Temple. This Gwaebul is Korean Treasure #1343. The central image of the large mural, which measures 1,143 cm in length and 852 cm in width, is that of Seokgamoni-bul. The Historical Buddha is joined by smaller Bodhisattva images of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). Joining these smaller Bodhisattva images are other Buddhas, as well, like that of Daboyeorae-bul (The Abundant Treasure Buddha) and Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). This large mural used to be kept at Boheungsa Temple on Mt. Geumseongsan. This Gwaebul was completed by nine monks including Uigyeom, and it’s believed to have first been painted in 1745.

How To Get There

From the Naju Bus Terminal, you’ll need to walk to get to the Gwangju Bank Bus Stop, which will take you about ten minutes (635 m). You’ll need to take the “Sunhwan 3 – 순환 3” bus. After six stops, or eight minutes, you’ll need to get off at the “Dabosa Entrance Stop – 다보사 입구.” From this stop, you’ll need to walk nine minutes (607 m) to get to Dabosa Temple.

Overall Rating: 7/10

Dabosa Temple is beautifully located on Mt. Geumseongsan in Naju, Jeollanam-do. Adding to this natural beauty are the statues inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall of Jijang-bosal and the Siwang, as well as the paintings of Sanshin and Dokseong inside the Chilseong-gak Hall. But the main highlight to Dabosa Temple are the collection of statues of both the main altar triad and Nahan statues inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. They are all so descriptively rendered and vibrantly painted.

The Haseong-dang Hall and Cheonbul-jeon Hall at the entry to Dabosa Temple. The Geumgangmun Gate. The historic Daeung-jeon Hall. One of the Daeung-jeon Hall’s exterior walls with a pagoda mural adorning it. This pagoda refers to the founding legend at Dabosa Temple. The main altar triad inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. An image of Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) at the centre of the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. A look at one of the expressive Siwang (Ten Kings of the Underworld) statues inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The Chilseong-gak Hall behind the Daeung-jeon Hall. A unique portrait of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) inside the Samseong-gak Hall. The Yeongsan-jeon Hall. A look inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall at the Korean Treasures housed inside it. A closer look at one of the Nahan inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Teaching busan/yangsan

Mon, 2021-09-06 22:55
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

I am looking  for a part-time job in Yangsan  or close to yangsan area.  I can work  until  230 pm. I have an f visa. I am also a certified  teacher  with a degree in elementary education.  Looking to start in February.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

집다 vs 줍다 – “To Pick Up” | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-09-06 19:15

Two common words for "to pick up" are the verbs 집다 and 줍다. Both of them mean "to pick up," and both of them are equally as common. So you'll need to learn how to use and conjugate both of them.

I'll talk about what each means, and when you'll want to use both of them in this week's episode of "Korean FAQ." This series is where I answer common Korean questions, or small tips for Korean that you might not find anywhere else.

The post 집다 vs 줍다 – “To Pick Up” | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

집다 vs 줍다 – “To Pick Up” | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-09-06 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Shop with Me at Starfield: Pre-autumn Shopping in Korea and Try-on (Korean-Filipino Couple)

Mon, 2021-09-06 02:07
— From Korea with Love
Chrissantosra.wordpress.com


 

 

Join 473 other followers

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Seonjisa Temple – 선지사 (Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Mon, 2021-09-06 00:20
Jesus Inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Seonjisa Temple in Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do. Temple History

Seonjisa Temple is located in the western part of Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do to the south of Mt. Gyeongunsan (377.2 m). Seonjisa Temple was officially registered as a temple with the Korean government in 2007. The name of Seonjisa Temple is in reference to the local town, Seonji. It is also the name of a local pond called Seonji, as well. Before 2007, it’s believed by some that there had been a temple on the Seonjisa Temple grounds until it fell into disrepair and disappeared altogether. For nearly thirty years, this temple was nothing more than a tent that the head monk lived in. Two lay women, or “bosal” in Korean,” donated a lot of money to have Seonjisa Temple built. Specifically, Seonjisa Temple was built for the worship of Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). The idea for this design came to the head monk after he had seen the five hundred Nahan of Gongjuksa Temple in China, which is located in Unnamseong. With this in mind, the name of the main hall at Seonjisa Temple is that of a Yeongsan-jeon Hall for the worship of Nahan.

Finally, and according to the head monk at Seonjisa Temple, the goal of the temple is to make people in this multi-religious world of the 21st century feel comfortable at Seonjisa Temple (more on this idea later).

Temple Layout

When you first approach Seonjisa Temple, you’ll approach it up a side road that snakes and winds its way up the foot of the mountain. Finally in the temple parking lot, and over a knoll, you’ll finally enter into the lower courtyard at Seonjisa Temple. To the left is the temple’s kitchen, and to the right are the monks’ dorms.

Straight ahead of you, and the largest shrine hall at Seonjisa Temple, is the Yeongsan-jeon (Vulture Peak Hall). The front entry doors to this hall are adorned with elfish-looking Gwimyeon (Monster Masks). There are two sets of murals that adorn the exterior walls of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. The first set, which is the lower set of the two, are the Sibiji-shin (The Twelve Spirit Generals). Each of the twelve are simplistically painted in their own panel and surrounded by a painted circle. As for the second set, which is painted above the Sibiji-shin, are a collection of paintings dedicated to the Nahan.

But the real highlight to Seonjisa Temple is what resides inside the Seonjisa Temple. Housed inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Seonjisa Temple are some five hundred statues of various figures.

These statues include such luminaries as Jangyu-hwasang (The monk brother of Queen Heo of Gaya), Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.), Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.), Seosan-daesa (1520-1604), and Jesus (Hyangsang-jonja – 향상존자). According to the head monk at Seonjisa Temple, Jesus is the 109th Nahan (Historical Disciple of the Buddha). And Jesus’ connection to the Nahan is through a temple in China. This temple in China is called Gongjuksa Temple in Unnamseong. Supposedly, Jesus traveled to China from the Middle East. And by way of China, and the aforementioned Chinese temple, Jesus traveled on to the Korean peninsula, and Seonjisa Temple in particular, with a Nahan. (This story was broadcast on a KBS TV program called Sponge). Jesus came to Korea to tell Koreans the message that we should live well together since the society we live in is multicultural and multi-religious.

As for the rest of the interior, and placed upon the main altar of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, you’ll find four statues. The statue in the centre is that of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This statue is joined on either side by Yeondeung-bul (The Past Buddha) and Mireuk-bul (The Historical Buddha). And the fourth statue to the far right on the main altar is a smaller version of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). Hanging on the far right wall is a well-populated Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

Up the mountainside to the right, you’ll find a small shrine hall dedicated to an Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) statue that dates back to 1605. This statue was only recently opened to the public within the past ten years, and the shrine hall that surrounds it proves just how recent of an addition it is. Backing the four hundred year old statue is a black mural of the Buddha of the Western Paradise. This black mural is also populated by the Four Heavenly Kings.

In the upper courtyard at Seonjisa Temple, and past a newly built storage area, you’ll find the temple’s Sanshin-gak Hall. Inside the Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll find a simple, yet beautiful, mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). You also get a beautiful view of the western part of Gimhae from this vantage point, as well.

How To Get There

There are a couple of buses that go to Seonjisa Temple. You can take Bus #21 or Bus #30 to get to Seonjisa Temple. You’ll need to get off at the Dongseon-maeul stop. From this stop, you should be able to see signs that say “Seonjisa – 선지사” on them. There are numerous brown signs with the name of the temple on them. And the road that leads up to Seonjisa Temple is a dead-end. So once you start heading in the right direction, you shouldn’t get lost.

Overall Rating: 7/10

While a bit difficult to find, Seonjisa Temple is definitely worth the effort. Where else will you find a statue of Jesus at a Korean Buddhist temple? The location is beautiful. The statue of Amita-bul is beautiful. The statues inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, including Jesus, are masterful. And when you add the story behind the statue of Jesus, you’ll need to find the time to visit Seonjisa Temple in Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do.

The Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Seonjisa Temple. A look up at the dancheong and dragons that adorn the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. The dragon mural, which is part of the Sibiji-shin (The Twelve Spirit Generals) set, that adorns the exterior walls of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. A look inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall with the main altar to the left. The Shinjung Taenghwa (left) and a phoenix mural (right) on the right side of the wall inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. Can you spot Jesus among the five hundred Nahan? There he is: Jesus !?! Some more of the amazing Nahan statues inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. A look over at the Yeongsan-jeon Hall from the small shrine hall that houses the four hundred year old statue of Amita-bul. And the small shrine hall that in fact houses Amita-bul at Seonjisa Temple. A look at the Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) statue. The Sanshin-gak Hall in the upper courtyard at Seonjisa Temple. Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). The beautiful view from the Sanshin-gak Hall down at the Yeongsan-jeon Hall and western Gimhae. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Available Immediately - E2 Looking For A Job

Sun, 2021-09-05 02:08
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Dongnae GuContact person by email

Hello,

 

I am from South Africa and have been in Korea for 4.5 years and have 4.5 years teaching experience ranging from Kindergarten to High School.

I have my own apartment already.

I am looking for a part-time job between 8:00-16:00. I will be changing my visa from E2 to D10 in the next week. Therefore, I am available for hire immediately .So, if you're looking for a young, energetic and experienced teacher simply reply to this post and we can take it from there.

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

English-Russian teaching part-time job

Sat, 2021-09-04 04:58
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: near Pusan National University, Dongnae, Somyeon Contact person by email

Hello, I am a student of PNU, Sogdiana. I hold visa D2, my nationality is Uzbekistan. I can teach English and Russian intermediate, upper- intermediate level. I have experience of working with kids. I am also fluent in Korean(TOPIK6). You can contact me by a phone call 01068522110 or email [email protected].

안녕하세요~ 한국에서 유학 중 요나입니다. 부산대 근처 거주자입니다.  우즈베키스탄에서 왔고 영어, 러시아어 튜터입니다. 7-11 살 아이들과 튜터링 경험이 있습니다. 관심 있으신 분 카톡 아이디 (Sogdiana21) 으로, 또는 [email protected] 이메일로 연락주시기 바랍니다~

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

The most confusing thing when learning Korean (feat. 허쌤)

Fri, 2021-09-03 15:27

Why is learning Korean so difficult sometimes?

Some aspects of Korean can take lots of time to master, leading many people to consider those concepts "difficult." In reality, there's nothing difficult about the language itself (if there were, I certainly wouldn't have learned it as well as I have), but it can be difficult to spend enough time to learn some of the concepts you'll need to have fluent conversations.

So I met with 허쌤 from "Learn Real Korean" on YouTube and we talked about what some of those difficult concepts are, as well as how I was able to get past them and learn them. Spoiler alert: most of them I learned simply through time and practice. But the good news is because I did it, so can you!

Check out 허쌤 at “Learn Real Korean” and tell her Billy sent you! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMx6DvyVefA7Lh0FMBTS-sQ

The post The most confusing thing when learning Korean (feat. 허쌤) appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Why is learning Korean so difficult??? (feat. 허쌤)

Fri, 2021-09-03 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

[77th TOPIK] TOPIK Ⅱ Actual test review ✨

Fri, 2021-09-03 04:11

Sign-up NOW and get 2-Weeks Free Trial

 


MasterTOPIK.com
Learning strategy which is the fastest and easiest way to reach the target TOPIK score,
at a reasonable price of $14 a month.    Stay Connected! MasterTOPIK
Facebook      Kakaotalk        Instagram
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Pages