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Haeinjeongsa Temple – 해인정사 (Saha-gu, Busan)

Mon, 2021-10-04 23:30
The View from the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall at Haeinjeongsa Temple in Saha-gu, Busan. Temple History

Haeinjeongsa Temple is located in Saha-gu, Busan. It’s located on the lower south-western slopes of Mt. Gudeoksan (545.3 m). Haeinjeongsa Temple is a modern temple. It first started being built in August, 1999. It has an overall size of 5,000 pyeong, or nearly 16,529 square metres. The first of the temple structures to be built was the main hall, the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, which started to be built in June, 2000. And the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall was completed in 2003. In total, there are half a dozen temple shrine halls for visitors to explore at Haeinjeongsa Temple.

Temple Layout

To get to the temple, you’ll first need to ascend a steep road that leads you towards the temple parking lot. To get there, you’ll need to pass under a high vaulted ceiling for the Boje-ru Pavilion. The ceiling of this pavilion is painted with beautiful dragon and Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities) murals.

Making your way up to the main temple courtyard, you’ll pass by the temple’s administrative office and kitchen. Ascending a set of stairs, you’ll finally enter into the main temple courtyard. Straight ahead of you is the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. As you approached the elevated main hall, you’ll notice the Jong-ru (Bell Pavilion) to your back. This is the upper portion of the Boje-ru Pavilion that you first passed through on your way up to the main temple courtyard. It’s also from this vantage point that you get some amazing views of the southwest-end of Busan off in the distance.

As for the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, its exterior walls are adorned with an assortment of golden Buddha and Bodhisattva murals. Stepping inside the main hall, you’ll notice seven statues taking up residence on the main altar. The central image, as the name of the shrine hall already hints at, is that of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy). This central image is flanked by two large seated statues of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) and Nosana-bul (The Perfect Body Buddha).

To the left of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this temple shrine hall are adorned with various murals like the frightening Judgment Murals that include images of Agwi (Hungry Ghosts) and Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). The interior to the Myeongbu-jeon Hall is rather cavernous but plain. The central image on the main altar is a statue of Jijang-bosal with a golden scroll in its hand. Interestingly, the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld) are absent from the interior of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall.

And to the right of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, and joined by the monks dorms to the far right, is the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. All of the exterior walls to the Gwaneum-jeon Hall are adorned with various incarnations of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). These murals include some of the thirty-three incarnations of Gwanseeum-bosal. As for the main altar inside the Gwaneum-jeon Hall, and much like the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, you’ll only find a solitary statue on the main altar. This is a golden statue of the Bodhisattva of Compassion.

The other two shrine halls that visitors can explore at Haeinjeongsa Temple are to the left of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. One is the rather underwhelming Yongwang-dang Hall, which is dedicated to Yongwang (the Dragon King). And the other shaman shrine hall is the Sanshin-gak Hall, which is dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). These bunker-like structures look out of place next to the brilliantly designed Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall.

How To Get There

To get to Haeinjeongsa Temple, you’ll first need to get to Goejeong Subway Station, stop #105, on line one of the Busan subway system. From there, you should take a taxi, because the roads that lead up to the temple are both confusing and steep. It should only cost you about 3,000 won to get to Haeinjeongsa Temple.

Overall Rating: 6.5/10

Haeinjeongsa Temple is one of the more complicated temples to rate. Because it’s harder to get to, and it has two dilapidated shaman shrine halls, it isn’t the best; however, with that being said, the newly constructed Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, the Gwaneum-jeon Hall, and the Myeongbu-jeon Hall help to elevate the overall rating of this newly constructed temple in Busan. Also, the spectacular views of southwestern Busan help add to the overall aesthetic of Haeinjeongsa Temple. So I guess what I’m trying to say is that Haeinjeongsa Temple is a bit of a mixed bag of sorts; but by far, the architecturally good outweighs the architecturally bad.

Passing under the Boje-ru Pavilion at Haeinjeongsa Temple. The second-story Jong-ru (Bell Pavilion). The Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall (right) and Myeongbu-jeon Hall (left). The main altar inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The beautiful view from the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall out towards the city of Busan. Inside the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. A look inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall at Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). Jijang-bosal with a tissue. The bunker-like shaman shrine halls dedicated to Yongwang (bottom) and Sanshin (top). —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
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In the middle (中) 중 & 중이다 (한자) | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-10-04 15:49

The 한자 character 中 (중) is used in a common Korean grammar form (~중이다), but also it's used together with certain nouns to mean "in the middle of."

And if you'd like to see more videos like this about 한자, be sure to give the video a Like and let me know in the comments!

The post In the middle (中) 중 & 중이다 (한자) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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In the middle (中) 중 & 중이다 (한자) | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-10-04 13:00

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Afterschool job

Mon, 2021-10-04 04:09
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: Haeundae Contact person by email

A part time job is available for an elementary school afterschool starting ASAP on Mondays and Fridays from 12 45 to 3 35.  The pay is 30 000 won per class (3 classes both days.  If interested please call or send text to 010 3118 9531.  Thanks

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Where can I get a MacBook repaired in Ulsan?

Mon, 2021-10-04 04:06

My MacBook won't turn on and I need someone to take a look at it. I heard the Apple store in Shinsegae & Lotte doesn't do repairs.. If anyone could recommend a place, I would really appreciate it!

Thaaaanks in advance!

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Peeka Boo Pink Mulhy

Mon, 2021-10-04 03:11
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Pink Mulhy

Mon, 2021-10-04 03:08
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Fridays in Kimhae Jangyu Busan

Sun, 2021-10-03 05:57
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Kimhae- Jangyu- Yulha- BusanContact person by email

Job wanted for Fridays- 01031207766

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5 am ocean fishing

Sat, 2021-10-02 20:43
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Korean Vending Machines

Sat, 2021-10-02 13:53

A few weeks ago, my friend and fellow photographer Colin Corneau suggested a topic to shoot as I was seeking out suggestions on what to photograph. I had recently picked up a roll of fotocola 400 35 mm film and Colin suggested “vending machines” as the topic given the name of the film.

With that in mind, I set out to find some of the older more “well loved” machines in my area. Keep in mind that I live in Korea and NOT Japan, so that means that vending machines are a little harder to find here. That being said, this was a great way to flex my creative skills and get in some walking too!

What I liked about this project were the limitations. I didn’t use my car, although I thought about driving out to Gyeongju and shooting Filnmlog’s vending machine. However, I knew that there had to be enough vending machines around my area to fill a roll of film. I also tried to only shoot vending machines that were older and keep everything on one roll of film.

By doing this and setting these limitations meant that I was not just spraying and praying. I set out each day with the intention of finding these icons of the 80’s and 90’s in Korea. It was a challenge in many cases as Korea is quite modern and the era of the vending machine is fading faster that I imagined.

Learning How To See

Another challenge was just how to photograph the machines once I found them. Shooting them straight on is an obvious but uninteresting angle in my opinion. So I had to step back and really figure out what the whole scene was saying. I know that sounds a little too “woo-woo” for most but it is true. Some of the machines had some character and that needed to come through on film. Other times it wasn’t just the machine but the location that was interesting.

After a few attempts, I managed to get an idea of how I wanted this little project to look. I also think that all the walking helped flush out some better ideas. The time walking from my apartment to “old downtown” in Ulsan, gave me time to figure out the limitations of what I can do with this film and camera combination as well as how I want to show these machines.

Learning From The Project

I must admit that I didn’t really think that I would learn anything from something so trivial as this. However, what I learned is that by choosing a subject and then limiting yourself by certain constraints, you can really amp up your creativity. This would have been a lot easier to do with my Canon EOS R and cherry picking the easiest vending machines that I could find.

This project really taught me to understand the subject a bit more. Yes, I am still talking about broken vending machines but you get the idea. The research and planning for subjects and ideas will help you in the long run.

The bottom line here is that this was not a huge thing. It was a fun experiment that I did with a cheap roll of film. However, I learned a lot and forced myself to find enough unique machines to complete the roll. In the future, I will try and shoot 1 subject per frame and see how that goes.

The post Korean Vending Machines appeared first on The Sajin.


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Lenovo Ideapad 310-15ABR

Sat, 2021-10-02 07:57
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Suyeong-GuContact person by email

I recently got a new laptop and am selling my previous model. This is a one-owner that I bought new back in the States. This laptop is in good working condition and used it for Skype and Zoom classes, amongst other things. Every port works and comes with a charger.

 

Here are some of the features:

15.6" screen, Windows 10 Installed, 1TB Hard Drive, 8 GB RAM, DVD Rom, 3 USB Ports, 1 HDMI Port, Card Reader, VGA Port, Webcam

 

**I am also including a Rosetta Stone Korean Level 1 CD-ROM course for free. I no longer have a disk drive so I have no use for this. You do not have to take the software to buy the laptop.

I am selling this laptop for 125,000 won. Please contact me at 010-3209-9036 with any questions.

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Experienced Teacher Looking for A Part-Time Position

Sat, 2021-10-02 04:39
Classified Ad Type: Location: Contact person by email

I  have been in Korea for 4.5 years and have 4.5 years teaching experience ranging from Kindergarten to High School.

I have my own apartment already.

I am looking for a part-time job between 8:00-16:00. I am currently on a D10 Visa. Therefore, I am available for hire immediately .So, if you're looking for a young, energetic and experienced teacher simply reply to this post and we can take it from there.

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Exploring Korea's growing longboarding culture

Fri, 2021-10-01 15:43

I've never tried skateboarding or longboarding before, but recently I met up with my friend Miru (미루) and found out she likes to longboard at the Han River.

I asked to join her one day, and she hung out with some of her friends who also do longboarding. I got to interview several of them and talk about why they enjoy the sport. And I even got a personalized lesson from a longboarding champion, who taught me all of the basics in just 10 minutes.

Say hi to Miru (미루) and tell her Billy sent you! https://www.instagram.com/misoharu_miru/

The post Exploring Korea's growing longboarding culture appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Exploring Korea's growing longboarding culture

Fri, 2021-10-01 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Korean classes in October!

Fri, 2021-10-01 03:34
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: pnu haeundae seomyon ksu bsu jangsanContact person by email

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

IMG_4553.JPG

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

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Yeoyeojeongsa Temple – 여여정사 (Miryang, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Thu, 2021-09-30 23:38
Inside the Upper Chamber of the Yaksa-jeon Hall at Yeoyeojeongsa Temple in Miryang, Gyeongsangnam-do. Temple History

Yeoyeojeongsa Temple is located on the western slopes of Mt. Geumosan (766.1 m) in southern Miryang, Gyeongsangnam-do. The name of the temple means “Watch, Listen, and Act With a Still Mind Temple” in English. The head monk at Yeoyeojeongsa Temple first opened a temple in Busan in 1995. He called this temple Yeoyeoseonwon Temple. Then, in 2005, he bought some land in Miryang, where he decided to build Yeoyeojeongsa Temple. And it would take a decade and a half to complete the temple.

Temple Layout

As you make your way up to the temple parking lot, you’ll pass by four stone statues of the Four Heavenly Kings. Having passed through the temple parking lot, you’ll notice a golden statue dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) under an old gnarled tree. Making your way to the right of this golden Buddha, and past the stone statue dedicated to the Bodhidharma, you’ll make your way up an incline towards the two-story main hall.

As a result of Yeoyeojeongsa Temple being built in the 21st century, everything at the temple is new including the two-story main hall. The first floor of the main hall is the Geukrak-jeon Hall. Sitting all alone on the main altar inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall is a statue dedicated to Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). The rest of the interior of the Geukrak-jeon Hall is filled with tiny Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) statues. There are numerous wooden alcoves that are filled with these figurines.

The second story of this structure, on the other hand, acts as the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. Along the expansive main altar, you’ll find a collection of seven statues. The statue in the middle is dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul. To its left and right are two standing statues dedicated to Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). These statue are then joined on either side by Amita-bul to the left and Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise) to the right. Rounding out the collection of statues, and to the far left, is a statue dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). And to the far right is a standing statue dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal. The collection of seven statues rest under a large golden canopy, or “datjib” in Korean.

To the left of the two-story main hall, you’ll find a large stone triad centred by a statue of Seokgamoni-bul. And out in front of the main hall is the temple’s Jong-ru Pavilion with a large Brahma Bell housed inside it. Finally, and to the right of the main hall, you’ll find a large collection of stone statues. This collection includes baby monks, the Bodhidharma, Gwanseeum-bosal, and a set of three monks that depict the idea of “See No Evil, Hear No Evil, and Speak No Evil.”

But let’s be honest, the real reason you’ve traveled all this way to Yeoyeojeongsa Temple is to see the subterranean Yaksa-jeon Hall, which just so happens to be burrowed out from the the side of the neighbouring mountain. The Yaksa-jeon Hall was completed in April, 2005. The entry to the cave lies to the left of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. Stepping inside the cave entryway, you’ll be greeted by a number of statues. A little further along, and hanging a right, you’ll enter into the lower chamber inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall. Instantly, you’ll be welcomed by a triad of statues centred by Yaksayeorae-bul. A little further along, and you’ll notice a seated stone statue dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). This shaman statue is surrounded by dozens of smaller sized stone statues dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul. Finally, and at the end of the lower chamber, you’ll find a stone enclosure with some more smaller sized Yaksayeorae-bul statues. In fact, the entire lower chamber is filled with these beautiful, tiny, stone statues. Joining these tiny stone statues is a larger seated image dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul, once more.

Having exited out of the lower chamber, and now taking the flight of stairs upwards, again, you’ll pass by a collection of brown Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) statues. Past these, and over a stone bridge that spans a stream of water, you’ll enter into the upper chamber inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall. Seated in the centre of a large Koi pond, you’ll find a seated image of Yaksayeorae-bul cradling a medicine jar atop a stone pedestal. Book-ending this statue of Yaksayeorae-bul, and mounted atop a pair of turtles, are two standing statues dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal. The twin water-pouring statues of the Bodhisattva of Compassion are backed by an additional thirty-three golden statues of Gwanseeum-bosal. And like the lower chamber, the upper chamber surrounds the large statues with smaller, white statues dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul.

Over a stone bridge to the far right, and past another stone statue dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal, you’ll find yourself in the centre of a small ante-chamber that houses a statue dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King). This statue is backed by a beautiful wooden relief of the shaman deity. Stepping into this ante-chamber, you’ll find a small rock opening to your left for the Sanshin-gak Hall. Inside this shaman off-shoot is a statue and mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).

How To Get There

From the Busan train station, you’ll need to take a Mugunghwa train to the Samrangjin train station. From there, you’ll need to take a taxi to get to Yeoyeojeongsa Temple. The ride should last 8.4 km, and it’ll cost you around 12,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 8/10

There are quite a few things to see in and around Yeoyeojeongsa Temple including the large collection of statues and the modern two-story main hall. However, it’s the subterranean Yaksa-jeon Hall that’s the star attraction at Yeoyeojeongsa Temple. You won’t find another shrine hall dedicated to the Medicine Buddha like the one you’ll find at Yeoyeojeongsa Temple. In fact, it’s nearly impossible to find such an elaborate cave shrine hall on the rest of the Korean peninsula. Take your time, and enjoy this subterranean shrine hall because there’s a lot to take in.

Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) under an old gnarled tree. An expressive Bodhidharma at the entry of the temple grounds. Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and the three statues representing “See No Evil, Hear No Evil, and Speak No Evil.” The back of the Bodhidharma as he looks towards the two-story main hall at Yeoyeojeongsa Temple. The main altar inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The countless amount of tiny statues of Gwanseeum-bosal inside the second-story Geukrak-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). A triad of statues centred by Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha) that greet you at the entry of the lower chamber inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall. A long look down the lower chamber inside the subterranean Yaksa-jeon Hall. A statue of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) surrounded by tiny statues of Yaksayeorae-bul. The beautiful lower chamber. The upper chamber inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall with a seated statue of Yaksayeorae (left) and a standing image of Gwanseeum-bosal (right). Some Koi swimming around their pond. A long look across the upper chamber inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall. A closer look at one of the two standing statues dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal inside the upper chamber. And the shrine dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King) inside the upper chamber. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
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