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Why you shouldn’t compare your Korean to others

Fri, 2021-10-08 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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MT supporters's tips for applying for the contest!

Fri, 2021-10-08 10:10

Sign-up NOW and get 2-Weeks Free Trial

 


MasterTOPIK.com
Learning strategy which is the fastest and easiest way to reach the target TOPIK score,
at a reasonable price of $14 a month.    Stay Connected! MasterTOPIK
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Online English teacher

Fri, 2021-10-08 06:43
Location: Business/Organization Type: 

33 year old experienced online English teacher. I'm originally from the UK and am offering online English classes to children of all ages. I use the APP Zoom to teach from. Price is 24,000 KRW per 40 minute class. I can help your child with reading, writing, speaking and grammar. I have plenty of courseware options to learn from as well.

Please feel free to contact me by email at [email protected] 

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Ask Dr.Kang - Most Frequently Asked Questions about Laser Vision Correction

Fri, 2021-10-08 04:24
Location: 

Dr. Kang is a leading surgeon of BGN Eye Hospital SMILE LASIK center. He has vast experience in Laser Vision Correction surgeries and will answer today our patients` most common questions.

Dr. Kang, a patient from Russia, Aygul is particularly worried about pain during and after surgery. Here is her question:
Is it painful during surgery? And what about pain during the recovery period?

During surgery, there is no pain, as anesthetic eye drops are used. However, manipulations of surgical instruments or cold liquid sensation during irrigation may be felt. After surgery period of pain varies, depending on the type of the surgery. In most cases, SMILE and LASIK surgery causes discomfort only on the day of the surgery. But in the case of LASEK, pain may last from 2 to 3 days.
 

Roman from Canada is worried about astigmatism
“I heard astigmatism is hard to correct. Can Laser Vision Correction correct astigmatism?

Like myopia, astigmatism can be corrected with Laser Vision Correction. And most high to moderate astigmatisms are corrected well. However, if astigmatism is very large, a small number of patients may have small amount of residual astigmatism after surgery. Patients who have large amount of astigmatism often have little discomfort after surgery, if there is a small amount of residual astigmatism left.

Sierra from UK is wondering about secondary surgery possibility
I have done LASIK surgery several years ago back home, but my vision deteriorated again. Can I do SMILE surgery?” 

In the case of SMILE surgery, the secondary operation can not be performed with the same method. In the case of traditional LASIK, reoperation is possible with the same method, however, there is a high risk of inferior ingrowth under the LASIK flap, therefore, if myopia has progressed again, SMILE, LASIK, and LASEK are all re-operated with LASEK.

Daria from Russia would like to know more about surgery side effects:
What are the main side effects of Laser Vision Correction?

Dry Eye Syndrome and glares are the main complaints of the patients after surgery. Dry eye syndrome usually lasts several months but may last over one year in rare cases, depending on the patient`s daily environment. Glares gradually subside over time, but night glares can persist to a degree that does not interfere with daily life.

Yulia from Uzbekistan is worried about pregnancy after Laser Vision Correction. 
I am planning to get pregnant next year. Can I do Laser Vision Correction before pregnancy?” 

Laser Vision Correction before pregnancy is not a problem at all. Surgery is not recommended during pregnancy, as there may be certain changes in the cornea. Therefore, if there is a possibility that you are currently pregnant, it is recommended to postpone the Laser Vision Correction. It is recommended to have surgery at least 3 months after childbirth.

 

Have more questions about Laser Vision Correction?

Or maybe wish to find out if you are a candidate for SMILE, LASIK, or LASEK?

Then do not hesitate to contact BGN Eye Hospital to book a free LASIK consultation.

You can reach BGN at their English direct line: 010-7670-3995,
Kakao: eye1004bgnbusan or
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/eyehospitalinkorea

 

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Seondosa Temple – 선도사 (Gyeongju)

Thu, 2021-10-07 23:35
The Central Image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) from the Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong at Seondosa Temple in Gyeongju. Temple History

Seondosa Temple is located in the south-western portion of Gyeongju on Mt. Seondosan (380.6 m). The mountain was regarded as the Pure Land in Korean Buddhism during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). Sadly, the mountain has been negatively impacted by forest fires in the not too distant past, which is made plain by the charred landscape. And near the peak of Mt. Seondosan is the diminutive Seondosa Temple. Near the base of the mountain, you’ll find the Royal Tomb of King Jinheung of Silla, which is Historic Site #177; the Royal Tomb of King Beopheung of Silla, which is Historic Site #176; as well as the Stele of King Muyeol, which is National Treasure #25.

As for the diminutive Seondosa Temple, it’s home to the Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong, which is Korean Treasure #62.

Temple Layout

Because I approached Seondosa Temple from the southeast side of Mt. Seondosa Temple, you’ll pass by the Royal Tomb of King Jinheung of Silla (r. 540 – 576 A.D.). King Jinheung of Silla was the twenty-fourth king to reign over the Silla Kingdom. King Jinheung was a strong advocate of Buddhism, which he felt would help strengthen and unify the nation. He also founded the famed Hwarang in 576 A.D., who were an elite group of youthful male warriors. King Jinheung also annexed the neighbouring Gaya Confederacy (42 – 562 A.D.). The annexing of the Gaya Confederacy helped expand the Silla lands. The tomb for King Jinheung measures some twenty metres in diametre, and it’s 5.8 metres tall. The tomb is located in a peaceful clearing among mature red pines.

It’s past the Royal Tomb of King Jinheung of Silla that you’ll find a trailhead leading up to Seondosa Temple. Along the way, you’ll pass by the nearly apocalyptic landscape. Continuing up the side-winding trail, you’ll eventually come to the outskirts of the temple grounds. Past the monks’ dorms, you’ll enter into the main temple courtyard at Seondosa Temple.

Straight ahead of you is the diminutive main hall, which matches the overall size of the entire temple grounds. Unfortunately, the main hall was locked when I visited. However, it’s to the left of the main hall that’s the true highlight to Seondosa Temple.

To the left of the main hall is the previously mentioned Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong. The surrealistic Korean Treasure is believed to have first been carved some time in the 7th century, during the transition from the Three Kingdoms of Korea to that of the Unified Silla Kingdom (668 – 935 A.D.). The rock carving is comprised of a triad of standing images. The central image, and the largest of the three, standing at seven metres in height, is Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). This central figure is highly disfigured. The face of Amita-bul has been split on either side (either purposely or the result of natural wear over time), and is now shaped like an inverted “V.” Amita-bul’s entire body is well worn and almost indistinguishable in parts and is joined to the left by a crowned Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Similar to Amita-bul, Gwanseeum-bosal is damaged on its left side. To the right stands Daesaeji-bosal (The Power and Wisdom of Amita-bul) which, of the three statues, is the least damaged.

To the rear of both the main hall and the Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong, and up the embankment, is the temple’s Samseong-gak Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall looks like a storage shed with its simplistic white, metal exterior. However, housed inside this shaman shrine hall, you’ll find highly original murals dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), Yongwang (The Dragon King), and Chilseong (The Seven Stars). The collection of shaman deities look more like animation characters than they do painted images of veneration. Either way, though, they are quite beautiful in their originality.

How To Get There

From the Gyeongju Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to catch a taxi to the southeast side of Mt. Seondosan. The taxi will cost you around 5,000 won (one way) with the ride lasting around ten minutes. From where the taxi drops you off, you should be able to see the trailhead markers near the Royal Tomb of King Jinheung of Silla leading you up towards Seondosa Temple.

Overall Rating: 7/10

Without a doubt, the main highlight to Seondosa Temple is the disfigured images of the Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong. They’re surrealistic in their now disfigured form. However, their original beauty shines through all of their destruction. In addition to this Korean masterpiece, you can enjoy the three unique murals dedicated to Sanshin, Chilseong, and Dokseong inside the Samseong-gak Hall. And if you’re really adventurous, you can enjoy the royal artifacts and tombs surrounding the base of Mt. Seondosa Temple, as well.

The Royal Tomb of King Jinheung of Silla at the trailhead leading up to Seondosa Temple. The beautiful autumn colours of Mt. Seondosan. Contrasted by the burnt foliage of Mt. Seondosan. The main temple courtyard at Seondosa Temple with the main hall to the right and the Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong to the left. A look at the disfigured Rock-Carved Standing Buddha Triad in Seoak-dong. An up-close of the central image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) that’s largely disfigured. The statue dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). And the statue dedicated to Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul). The Samseong-gak Hall at Seondosa Temple. The painting inside of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And the blue dragon from the Yongwang (The Dragon King) mural. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

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Inner Peace Art Store
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Step 1. A Tour Of Bookstores

Thu, 2021-10-07 20:44

Instagram     YouTube

Hi 안녕하세요 I'm Won!
I hope this channel is helpful

Private Korean lesson (Conversation, Pronunciation, Writing etc)
You can check more detail on my Instagram page

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Hangul Stroke Order – How to Write Korean Letters

Thu, 2021-10-07 09:36

As you’ve been learning Korean and its alphabet, a thought may have crossed your mind: is there a Hangul stroke order? The answer to this is yes! Specific stroke orders are also followed in writing each character in the Korean alphabet.

This lesson will help you learn each stroke order for the Korean letters. By the end of this lesson, you’ll not only have improved on your skills as you write in the Korean language, and you’ll be well on your way to crafting some beautiful calligraphy with Hangul!

What is Hangul Stroke Order?

As its name suggests, Hangul stroke order is the specific order of stroke in writing the letters of the Korean alphabet, or Hangul. Although they are only letters and not characters expressing a whole word, there is a specific way to write each Korean character. These rules appear to have origins in Chinese calligraphy and are especially useful for writing in Korean.

What does Korean writing look like?

If you’re new to learning the Korean language and it’s your first time encountering the Korean writing system, it may just look the same as Japanese or Chinese writing. However, Korean writing’s distinctive characteristic is the round letters like ㅇ or ㅎ. Korean writing also has spaces added between words. As you learn Korean, distinguishing it from the rest will become easier.

How to Write Each Letter Correctly

This section will teach you the traditional and most commonly accepted stroke order for each letter in the Korean alphabet. An example for each character is shown in the images.

How to write Korean letters – Consonants

Below are the stroke orders for Korean consonants, which also apply to the double consonants.

ㄱ (기역, giyeok)

This is a single-stroke character, meaning you’ll start and finish it in one stroke. Start from the left and then drop down.

ㄴ (니은, nieun)

This is also a single-stroke letter, starting by dropping down on the left side before continuing as a horizontal line towards the right.

ㄷ (디귿, digeut)

Your first two-stroke character. Start by drawing the top line, from left to right. Then finish it by drawing ㄴ below the first line.

ㄹ (리을, rieul)

This is the first slightly more complex character. First, draw the shape of ㄱ, as instructed above. Then, draw a horizontal line, from the left to the right, so that the line touches the finishing tip of the ㄱ.

Then, finish off with an ㄴ, connecting it to the start of the horizontal line. In other words, to draw ㄹ, you can imagine yourself drawing ㄱ and ㄷ connected as one character.

ㅁ (미음, mieum)

Start by drawing a line from top to bottom. Next, connect a ㄱ shape to it, drawn on the right side of the line. Lastly, at the bottom of this figure, draw a horizontal line from left to right. As a result, you should now see a box shape, aka the Korean character ㅁ.

ㅂ (비읍, bieup)

Again, start by drawing a vertical line. Then, draw another vertical line next to it, but not to touch the two lines. Now, draw two small horizontal lines between these two vertical lines, both from left going to right, the first one around the center and the second one right at the bottom.

ㅅ (시읏, sieut)

Start this one from the center top, first drawing a line going down towards the left, then going back to the top spot to draw another line to the right.

ㅇ (이응, ieung)

For another single stroke character, simply draw a circle, counterclockwise, to get the character ㅇ.

ㅈ (지읏, jieut)

Start by drawing a horizontal line, from the left going to the right. Then, draw the legs as you drew the Korean character ㅅ.

ㅊ (치읓, chieut)

Start by drawing a small horizontal line that should be narrower than the rest of the character. Then, below this line, draw the character ㅈ.

ㅋ (키읔, kieuk)

First, draw the character ㄱ as you normally would. Then, add another horizontal line from left to right, below the higher line, and connect it to the vertical line.

ㅌ (티읕, tieut)

For this character, first stroke the highest horizontal line. Then follow by drawing another horizontal line below it. Lastly, in one stroke, draw the character ㄴ, so that it connects to the horizontal lines you drew first.

ㅍ (피읖, pieup)

Start by drawing a horizontal line, from left to right. Then, draw two vertical lines from top to bottom. The first one on the left, then one on the right. Finish by drawing a horizontal line at the bottom, from left to right, connecting to both of the vertical lines.

ㅎ (히읗, hieuh)

Begin by drawing a small horizontal line. Below this line, draw a wider horizontal line. Finish off by drawing a circle below these two lines, counterclockwise.

How to write Korean letters – Vowels

Unlike consonants, vowels are primarily made up of lines. The correct stroke order for each Korean vowel is illustrated below.

ㅏ (a)

First, draw a vertical line, top to bottom. Then, find the middle of the line and draw a small horizontal line onto the right side.

ㅑ (ya)

Start by drawing the vertical line from top to bottom. Then, connect to its right side two short horizontal lines.

ㅐ (ae)

First, drawㅏ as instructed above. Then, draw another vertical line, from top to bottom, to connect to where the small horizontal line ends.

ㅒ (yae)

First, draw ㅑ as instructed above. Then, draw another vertical line, from top to bottom, to connect to where the small horizontal lines end.

ㅓ (eo)

Begin by drawing the small horizontal line, from left to right. Then, connect a longer vertical line to its right tip, from top to bottom.

ㅕ (yeo)

Begin by drawing two small horizontal lines, from left to the right side, one above the other. Then, connect a longer vertical line to where they end on the right, from top to bottom.

ㅔ (e)

First, draw ㅓ as instructed above. Then, next to the first vertical line, draw another one, from top to bottom, so that they are close but do not touch.

ㅖ (ye)

First, drawㅕ as instructed above. Then, next to this, draw another vertical line.

ㅗ (o)

First, draw a short vertical line from top to bottom. Then, below it, draw a horizontal line, from left to the right side, connecting to the vertical line in the center.

ㅛ (yo)

First, draw two short vertical lines, from top to bottom. Then, below them, draw a horizontal line, from the left to the right, to connect to the vertical lines.

ㅜ (u)

First, draw a horizontal line. Then, find the center of that line and draw a short vertical line connected to it.

ㅠ (yu)

Draw a horizontal line first. Then, connected to this line, draw two short vertical lines.

ㅡ (eu)

A very easy one, simply draw a horizontal line from left to right.

ㅣ(i)

Lastly, just as easy as ㅡ, you can draw a vertical from top to bottom. That’s it!

Modifications to the traditional look of letters

As you may have noticed, some modifications to some of the letters’ look appear depending on the font used as you write the Korean alphabet. Most notably, ㅊ and ㅎ appear to lose the small horizontal line at the top instead of being drawn as a short vertical line connecting to the longer horizontal line.

This is completely normal to see especially when typing on your computer using a basic Western font. However, at least as long as you are a beginner, we advise using the traditional order of strokes and methods to write Korean letters.

The Korean stroke order of a syllable

How about the order of strokes for a syllable? Depending on the letters that a syllable is constructed of, the order is either left to right, top to bottom – or a combination of both!

Here are some examples.

가요 (gayo, to go)

The syllable 가 is written from left to right. Meaning, first write ㄱ and then add ㅏ. Meanwhile, the syllable 요 is done top to bottom, starting with ㅇ and then adding ㅛ.

닭 (dal, chicken)

Here, on the other hand, a combination of sorts is used as there are four letters in the syllable. First, start from left to right with the top row, withㄷ and then ㅏ. Afterward, move onto the bottom row, first write ㄹ and then ㄱ.

How important is stroke order for Hangul?

In learning how to write Korean letters, stroke orders may often be overlooked. Although the output may appear the same, following stroke orders essentially make a difference for the following reasons. If you’re in South Korea, you might come across

Your writing will look neater.

Following the correct order of the stroke as you write a Hangul character produces a neater result. When you write the Korean alphabet without following the stroke order, it often results in messier handwriting, making it hard for the reader to comprehend.

It’s easy to understand your handwriting.

Even when you’re writing quickly, Korean alphabet letters are easily understandable when the correct stroke order was followed when it was written. The reader can correctly interpret the writing based on the correct number of strokes and the order of strokes you used.

It makes calligraphy easier.

If you’re also into calligraphy, knowing the correct stroke order in Hangul will help you produce a better result. This is because the Korean alphabet follows the rules of Chinese calligraphy, which includes the order of the strokes.

Is there cursive in Korean?

Yes, however, not in the same way in English the Latin alphabet. There are no specific rules or standards when it comes to writing cursive in Korean, so it is not official, unlike the Latin alphabet. Think of it as your handwritten version of the Korean alphabet, usually with lesser strokes.

Cursive in English letters are written in a continuous and flowing manner as it forms a word. When cursive in Korean is written, each letter still has to be separate. The Korean alphabet is already clustered when it forms syllables, so joining them together might make it difficult to read.

How do you write in Korean naturally?

Just like learning Korean language in general, practicing regularly will help you improve. If you want to have natural Korean handwriting, it’s best to expose yourself constantly to different materials you can use for practice. As you do so, it’s best to follow the stroke order early on to help you get used to it.

Hurray, we hope this has been helpful! You should now be able to write the Korean alphabet in the correct order! Did you find all of this simple and logical to understand, or was a particular character giving you a hard time? Don’t worry, as you can double-check your work here, and consistent practice will help you the most. Comment what you think below this article, and we’ll support you as much as we can!

The post Hangul Stroke Order – How to Write Korean Letters appeared first on 90 Day Korean®.

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

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HP Pavilion X360 2in 1 i5 8th gen

Thu, 2021-10-07 05:26
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: GijangContact person by email

HP Pavilion X360 2in1 

Screen: 1920X1080P FullHD (New)

CPU: i5-8250U 1.6Ghz

RAM: 8GB DDR4

SSD: 240GB(New)

whole LCD assembly replaced 

Overall it's in rough shape (a lot of scratches)

Considering its condition, price set very low for this model!

Asking 360,000won

Call or text 010-2833-6637

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Cheonbulsa Temple – 천불사 (Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Wed, 2021-10-06 23:29
A Statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) at Cheonbulsa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. Temple History

Cheonbulsa Temple is located to the north-east of Mt. Yongcheonsan (544.7 m) in the eastern part of Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. The name of the temple means “Sky Buddha Temple” in English, and it was originally constructed in 1974. Cheonbulsa Temple’s name refers to the energy of the temple that it gets from the heavenly realm of Tushita. When the head monk at Cheonbulsa Temple wanted to build a temple, he held a memorial service for one thousand days in a cave at Yaksuam Hermitage near Baekyangsa Temple in Gwangju. During this memorial service, the head monk received a divine revelation. In this revelation, he learned that he should find a place where the peaks of three mountains met. There, he should build a temple where a white crane sat. Eventually, the head monk found this location in Yangsan. Initially, he pitched a tent in the area, until he was able to develop the land and the temple more. Eventually, the head monk would build the amazing temple that we see currently at Cheonbulsa Temple.

Temple Layout

You first approach the temple grounds up a pathway with a slight incline. Along the way, you’ll pass by a Koi pond to your left. In the centre of this Koi pond appears a seated stone image of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). And to your right is another Koi pond with a water fountain in the centre of it.

Continuing up the pathway that has a beautiful canopy of paper lanterns over top, you’ll notice a line of stone statues dedicated to the Sibijin-shin (The Twelve Spirit Generals) to your left. A little further along, and back at the main pathway, you’ll notice a two-story Jong-ru Pavilion with an elaborate set of the four traditional Buddhist percussion instruments to your left. And this bell pavilion is fronted by a simplistic five-story pagoda with a lotus flower relief design around its base. And to the right is a matching five-story pagoda.

Continuing your ascent, you’ll finally come to the main temple courtyard at Cheonbulsa Temple. The Daeung-jeon Hall is beautifully adorned both inside and out. Some of the latticework on the main hall is second to none, especially the white and red images of Wolgwang-bosal (The Moonlight Bodhisattva) and Ilgwang-bosal (The Sunlight Bodhisattva). As for the murals that adorn the exterior walls, they are an assortment of Buddhist motifs. And out in front of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a jovial stone statue dedicated to Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag), as well as a large, green jade incense burner.

Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad of statues resting on the main altar centred by Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). This statue is joined on either side by Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul). To the immediate left of the main altar is a thousand armed seated statue dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal. And to the immediate right of the main altar, you’ll find a colourful wooden relief dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). On the far left wall, on the other hand, hangs an amazing large wooden relief of the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). And on the right is a standing statue dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). This statue is backed by an elaborate, black mural of Jijang-bosal.

To the left of the main hall is the Yongwang-dang Hall. Inside the Yongwang-dang Hall, you’ll find a standing image of Yongwang (The Dragon King). This statue of the Dragon King stands atop a blue dragon who hovers over top of a shallow pool of water. The statue of Yongwang is backed by a large mural of the shaman deity joined by a pair of twisting yellow and blue dragons. And surrounding the wide main altar are murals of Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities). And to the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find an elegant stone relief dedicated to a contemplative Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha).

To the rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a row of white jade statues centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). It’s also from this vantage point that you get an amazing view of the neighbouring mountains. Continuing up the mountain, and past a pair of burial mounds (not associated with Cheonbulsa Temple), you’ll find the Samseong-gak Hall. Sitting in the centre of the main altar is a statue dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). And to the right is a statue and painting dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). Rather interestingly, and to the left of the central image of Chilseong, is a window that looks out onto cascading water with Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) at its base.

Heading back down the mountain, you’ll find a more modern looking shrine hall. This rather long shrine hall actually houses two temple shrine halls. The temple shrine hall to the right is the Yaksa-jeon Hall. Inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall, you’ll find seven standing images with the central statue dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha). And the temple shrine hall to the left, with its own entry, is the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The entire Geukrak-jeon Hall is filled with a soothing golden light that’s emitted from the thousands of tiny statues dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). There is a shrine dedicated to Jijang-bosal in the central part of the numerous alcoves inside this temple shrine hall. And to the far left, you’ll find a large statue dedicated to Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) on the main altar of the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The hallway outside both of these entryways is filled with beautiful painted floral patterns. So look upwards in this area.

Through the years, much has changed in and around Cheonbulsa Temple. However, what has remained constant is the beautiful Gwaneum-jeon Hall. To the front of the Yaksa/Geukrak-jeon Halls, and up an uneven set of stairs, you’ll find a beautiful corridor filled with stone statues dedicated to the thirty-three incarnations of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). All of these life-sized statues are amazingly rendered and lead up towards a cave entrance. Traditionally, as you walk among the statues, you’re supposed to pray every three steps. Watch your head, as you step inside the low-lying entryway to the Gwanseum-jeon Hall. Lining the walls, as you make your way up the passageway, are glowing row-upon-row of Gwanseeum-bosal figurines. Stepping inside the vaulted inner chamber of the Gwaneum-jeon Hall, you’ll find, seated all alone on the main altar, a beautiful, golden statue dedicated to the Bodhisattva of Compassion shimmering in the softened darker light of the prayer hall. The golden statue is joined by carved images of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) around the circumference of the cavernous interior.

How To Get There

To get to Cheonbulsa Temple, you’ll need to take Bus #50 or #301 from the Nopo-dong subway stop in Busan. You’ll need to get off the bus in Deokgye in Yangsan at the “Deokgye Sageo-ri – 덕계사거리” stop. From this stop, you’ll need to find the local bus stop in front. This local bus sign will say “Cheonbulsa – 천불사” on it. This bus comes every thirty minutes.

Overall Rating: 7.5/10

This temple is packed with beautiful Buddhist temple artistry and architecture. The Daeung-jeon Hall is beautifully adorned with amazing latticework. Also have a look for the large, green jade incense burner at the front of the main hall, as well as the artwork inside the Yongwang-dang Hall to the left of the Daeung-jeon Hall. Other interesting aspects are the two-in-one Yaksa/Geukrak-jeon Halls and the cascading waterfall behind the Samseong-gak Hall. But the most beautiful aspect of Cheonbulsa Temple is the subterranean Gwaneum-jeon Hall that has an outdoor shrine leading up to the temple shrine hall with thirty-three different incarnations of the Bodhisattva of Compassion. It’s really something that needs to be explored and experienced.

The entry to Cheonbulsa Temple. The row of Sibijin-shin (The Twelve Spirit Generals) statues. The Daeung-jeon Hall at Cheonbulsa Temple. Some of the beautiful latticework adorning the Daeung-jeon Hall. An up-close of some of the reliefs adorning the jade incense burner out in front of the Daeung-jeon Hall. A look inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Yongwang-dang Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall at Cheonbulsa Temple. And the beautiful view from the Samseong-gak Hall. The amazing dancheong corridor out in front of the Yaksa-jeon Hall and the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The golden shrine dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The trail leading up towards the Gwaneum-jeon Hall and outdoor shrine dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). One of the beautiful Gwanseeum-bosal statues in the outdoor shrine dedicated to the Bodhisattva of Compassion. A look down the outdoor shrine dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal. A collection of some of the thirty-three incarnations of the Bodhisattva of Compassion. One last look as you near the entry of the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. The subterranean corridor leading into the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. And a look inside the Gwaneum-jeon Hall at a golden, seated image of Gwanseeum-bosal. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
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~해 보니까 After doing | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2021-10-06 16:27

Do you know about the form ~해 보니까 or ~아/어/etc. 보니까?

The form ~해 보니까 is used to show that you've realized something after having tried something, typically for the first time.

It's a combination of the ~해 보다 form ("to try") and the ending (으)니까 which can mean "because" or to show a realization after doing something.

This past Sunday I held a live Intermediate Level Korean classroom on my YouTube channel and we learned all about this form. And now it's condensed to just 7 minutes so you can review it quickly.

The post ~해 보니까 After doing | Live Class Abridged appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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~해 보니까 After doing | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2021-10-06 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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LZONE Korean Language Program

Wed, 2021-10-06 07:25
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

Korean Language Program at LZONE

 

1. Korean Language Tutoring

You can get Korean language tutoring with reasonable price from a qualified teacher at LZONE.

This program is good for those who prepare TOPIK test and also foreign students who are studying Korean language now.

 

Tutoring fee 

110,000 won a month (once a week)

200,000 won a month (twice a week)

280,000 won a month (3 times a week)

 

2. Korean Language Study Group

We meet at 2:30 at LZONE Language study cafe.
We introduce each other and small talk in Korean for 10~15minutes.
We watch a short video with Korean subtitle for about 10minutes together.
We study vocabulary, grammar, sentences and expressions in the video with script for about an hour.

It is not class but more study group.
Foreigners who study Korean language can join us :)
We talk in Korean so we can practice our Korean language.
We help each other when we study the script.

Participation fee is 5,000won (a canned beverage is included) 

 

1544/7823 / 010-2643-7823

Kakao : lzonecafe

LOZNE, 3F, 35, Yongso-ro 13beon-gil, Nam-gu, Busan, Republic of Korea

(Near Kyugsung/Pukyoung Subway Station)

 

 

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[EVENT] MT Hangeul Song Cover Contest -- Gold Winner receive an iPhone 13 (Short)

Wed, 2021-10-06 06:29

Sign-up NOW and get 2-Weeks Free Trial

 


MasterTOPIK.com
Learning strategy which is the fastest and easiest way to reach the target TOPIK score,
at a reasonable price of $14 a month.    Stay Connected! MasterTOPIK
Facebook      Kakaotalk        Instagram
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Light weight and foldable stroller

Wed, 2021-10-06 03:12
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Jangjeon subway stationContact person by email

Hello everyone,

My baby moved back to home country two weeks before. Therefore, I would like to sell our baby stroller (avalon). We bought newly at coupang in April 2021. We used rarely in weekends and still it looks new.

For more details find the coupang link below,

https://www.coupang.com/vp/products/92903426

New one price: 69,000 KRW.

I am offering 49,000 KRW and negotiable. If interested please contact by email or kakao talk id: dnkrn2 

43E8616D-B921-456E-8FE4-91B057675DD2.jpeg 65E1A1FA-987C-4691-97C1-58A3A76DF356.jpeg 98FB1A27-BB37-45D4-8511-8D7921F81259.jpeg 9AFAFC95-09E6-4C70-8EF4-81EE6CC82062.jpeg
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JK Boston Academy at Marine City in Busan

Tue, 2021-10-05 13:08
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Dongback Near Marine City !!Contact person by email I am looking for someone who is a reliable, responsible, and caring teacher!!

Starting Date: November 

Hourly Payments: 20,000~ 25,000 won ( Depends on work experience) 

Location :Near Dong Baek Station, Marine City 

Working Hours : Monday - Friday 1:30-5:30 



* E2 VISA SUPPORT
**** F6 VISA PREFFERED !!!!*** Please send me your resume, recent photo, nationality , current location, and visa status

* We only accept native English teacher. Please feel free to contact me at [email protected] or 010-8948-8846 ( English Speaking) 

 

Does the school pay monthly contributions into a Pension Plan? : 

Yes

Is Health Insurance in the contract? : 

Yes

Do you arrange for immigration permission to work this job? *: 

No

Are you a licensed recruiter? : 

No

Recruiter Documentation: 

No Recruiter Documentation Provided

Jackie Kim 

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[EVENT] MT Hangeul Song Cover Contest -- Gold Winner receive an iPhone 13

Tue, 2021-10-05 08:19

Sign-up NOW and get 2-Weeks Free Trial

 


MasterTOPIK.com
Learning strategy which is the fastest and easiest way to reach the target TOPIK score,
at a reasonable price of $14 a month.    Stay Connected! MasterTOPIK
Facebook      Kakaotalk        Instagram
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-- Sing along Korean │Korean consonant song

Tue, 2021-10-05 08:01

Sign-up NOW and get 2-Weeks Free Trial

 


MasterTOPIK.com
Learning strategy which is the fastest and easiest way to reach the target TOPIK score,
at a reasonable price of $14 a month.    Stay Connected! MasterTOPIK
Facebook      Kakaotalk        Instagram
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

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