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Live Korean Class -- | [Intermediate] ~해 보니까 "After doing"

Thu, 2021-09-30 20:24

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Geojoam Hermitage – 거조암 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Wed, 2021-09-29 23:26
Inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Geojoam Hermitage in Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Hermitage History

Geojoam Hermitage is located on the eastern slopes of the famed Mt. Palgongsan (1193 m) in Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. And Geojoam Hermitage is a branch hermitage of the neighbouring Eunhaesa Temple. Originally, the hermitage was known as Haeansa Temple. However, there is some dispute as to when the temple was first built.

In fact, there are three theories as to when the temple was first built. The first theory states that the temple was first completed under the watchful eye of Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) in 693 A.D. However, since Wonhyo-daesa died in 686 A.D., it’s highly unlikely that he founded Geojoam Hermitage in 693 A.D. Another theory states that the temple was completed in 738 A.D. by the monk Woncham. And a third theory states that the temple was completed during the reign of King Gyeongdeok of Silla (742 – 765 A.D.) through a royal decree. Whatever theory may be correct, all the theories claim that Geojoam Hermitage was completed before that of Eunhaesa Temple in 809 A.D. Throughout the years, Geojoam Hermitage has been renovated numerous times because of fires.

It’s believed that the Buddhist revival movement, which would become known as Jeonghye Gyeolsa, has its origins at Geojoam Hermitage. The movement was launched by the monk Deukjae, who was also the abbot of Geojoam Hermitage in 1188.

Predating this, in 1182, the monk Jinul (1158-1210) attended a dharma gathering at Bojesa Temple in Kaesong (now in present day North Korea). Here, he learned different meditation techniques. Then, in the spring of 1188, the abbot of Geojoam Hermitage, Deukjae, conducted a Buddhist gathering of fellow monks. It was at this time that Jinul was staying at Bomunsa Temple on Mt. Hagasan in Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. This meeting was conducted to form Jeonghye Gyeolsa (Concentration and Wisdom Community). This community would later move to Songgwangsa Temple in Suncheon, Jeollanam-do in 1190. It was here that Jinul would continue to grow this new Buddhist community by inviting monks from various Buddhist Orders with whom he had practiced and studied throughout the years before establishing Jeonghye Gyeolsa and Songgwangsa Temple.

The goal of Jeonghye Gyeolsa would be to create a new Buddhist community of pure-minded practitioners deep in the mountains of the Korean peninsula. This new form of Korean Buddhism would ultimately lead to the founding of the Jogye-jong Order. The main focus of Jinul’s new movement was to teach a comprehensive approach to Buddhism that included meditation (Seon), doctrine (Gyo), chanting and lectures. And Jinul’s time at Geojoam Hermitage would help form this new movement.

The Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Geojoam Hermitage from 1932.

During the late Goryeo (918-1392), Geojoam Hermitage would gain a reputation as a great place to pray. This reputation was in large part due to a legend associated with the monk Wonham. In this legend, Wonham met an enlightened being named Nakseo at Geojoam Hermitage. From Nakseo, Wonham learned the teachings that revealed the dharma of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). It was through these teachings that a person could reach an eternal life. This made the hermitage famous for the site of important prayers.

During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), and according to the Buddhist Temples Past and Present, which was published in 1799, Geojoam Hermitage was already closed at this time. Later, the hermitage was renovated. The exact date of this renovation is unknown. However, because the hermitage was largely destroyed, the renovations of Geojoam Hermitage focused on the historic Yeongsan-jeon Hall, which still remained intact.

In 1912, the hermitage changed its name from Geojosa Temple to that of Geojoam Hermitage, when Geojoam Hermitage became a branch hermitage of the neighbouring Eunhaesa Temple. A restoration of the entire hermitage took place in July, 1970, and the roof tiles for the Yeongsan-jeon Hall were repaired, as well, in June, 1978.

Geojoam Hermitage is home to one National Treasure. The Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Geojoam Hermitage is National Treasure #14, and it was first built in 1375, which makes it one of Korea’s oldest wooden structures. In fact, it’s one year older than the famed Muryangsu-jeon Hall at Buseoksa Temple in Yeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do.

Admission to the hermitage is free.

Hermitage Layout

You first approach Geojoam Hermitage from the hermitage parking lot. You’ll pass under the two-story Jong-ru Pavilion. The first story of the unpainted structure acts as an entryway to the main hermitage courtyard. And inside the second floor of the Jong-ru Pavilion, you’ll find all four of the traditional Buddhist percussion instruments.

Up the stone stairway, you’ll finally enter into the main hermitage courtyard. Straight ahead of you stands the historic Yeongsan-jeon Hall. This National Treasure was first built in August, 1375, making it the third oldest wooden structure at a Korean temple behind the Daeung-jeon Hall at Sudeoksa Temple and the Geukrak-jeon Hall at Bongjeongsa Temple in Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The reason that we can know the precise age of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall is from calligraphic records found inside the hermitage structure. Also, and because of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall’s age, it allows us to look back into Korea’s past; and more specifically, a look back into the Goryeo Dynasty’s (918-1392) architectural past.

The unadorned exterior walls of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall are unique for its Jusimpo – 주심포 bracketing style. However, it’s the interior, more than the exterior, that makes the shrine hall so special. Housed inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, you’ll find 526 stone statues dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). It’s exceedingly rare to find a temple or hermitage in Korea that houses the Nahan inside the main hall. And if you look close enough, you’ll notice that each of the historic stone Nahan statues has a different facial expression and pose.

Joining the rows of Nahan statues inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall is a main altar centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). Seokgamoni-bul is surrounded by a beautiful stone nimbus. Furthermore, the Yeongsan-jeon Hall has become famous for being able to grant prayers for miraculous virtues.

Out in front of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall is a three-story stone pagoda that dates back to the late Goryeo Dynasty to the early Joseon Dynasty. The pagoda is classified as Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Property Material #104.

To the far left of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, you’ll find the recently built monks’ quarters. And between the monks’ quarters and the Yeongsan-jeon Hall is the hermitage’s Sanshin-gak Hall. This diminutive shrine was built during the latter part of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). And housed inside the Sanshin-gak Hall is an image of the Mountain Spirit with a blue robe who is holding a wooden staff.

How To Get There

There is no bus that directly goes to Geojoam Hermitage. Instead, you’ll have to follow the signs that lead you towards the hermitage from the neighbouring Eunhaesa Temple. You can catch a bus from Hayang that leaves about every hour to get to Eunhaesa Temple.

Overall Rating: 8/10

There isn’t all that much to see at Geojoam Hermitage. In fact, there are just a few structures at the hermitage which includes the Jong-ru Pavilion, the Sanshin-gak Hall, and the three-story stone pagoda. However, the size of Geojoam Hermitage means very little because it’s also home to one of Korea’s oldest wooden structures, which just so happens to be a National Treasure, as well. The Yeongsan-jeon Hall at Geojoam Hermitage dates back to 1375, and it gives visitors a helpful insight into what Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) architecture must have looked like. Adding to its overall beauty are the 526 statues of stone Nahan statues inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall, as well. You can spend hours simply marveling over the intricate beauty of this historic hermitage shrine hall so enjoy!

The Jong-ru Pavilion at the entry of the hermitage. The stairs leading up to the hermitage courtyard. The four traditional Buddhist percussion instruments on the second-story of the Jong-ru Pavilion. The historic Yeongsan-jeon Hall that dates back to 1375. The main altar inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. The rows of beautiful stone Nahan inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. A row of six Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). A closer look at one of the Nahan. And yet another amazing look at a Nahan. The three-story stone pagoda in the centre of the hermitage courtyard. The monks’ dorms to the left of the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. The diminutive Sanshin-gak Hall that’s located between the Yeongsan-jeon Hall and the dorms. And the mural dedicated to the Mountain Spirit inside the Sanshin-gak Hall. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

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다 보니까 "Realizing" | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2021-09-29 15:04

This past Sunday we had another new live Korean class, and the topic was the grammar form 다 보니까.

The full form of 다 보니까 is actually 다(가) 보니(까), and we talked about how this form is actually a combination of the grammar ending 다(가), the verb 보다, and the ending (으)니(까). We also learned another usage for (으)니(까) besides "because."

The post 다 보니까 "Realizing" | Live Class Abridged appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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다 보니까 "Realizing" | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2021-09-29 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Canadian, F6 visa, female, looking for part time kindy in Yangsan

Wed, 2021-09-29 10:40
Classified Ad Type: Location: Contact person by email

Hi, I have been living and working in Korea for over 10 years, originally from Canada. I am an outgoing, high spirited teacher with a lot of experience (especially with younger children). I am currently available for a morning, part time position during the week. If you would like further information and references please feel free to message or email me. 

I look forward to hearing from you.

Heather 

HeatherHemstreet Resume 2021.doc HeatherHemstreet Resume 2021.doc
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50 Classroom Energizers and Games

Wed, 2021-09-29 02:10

Hi everyone,
I compiled a list of 50 Classroom Energizers and Games.
It's quite long at an hour, but I hope there are a few games that prove useful for class.

50 Games Website Article ► https://etateach.com/esl-games-energizers.html

YouTube Channel: Etacude

ERIC O. WESCH

Teacher/YouTuber

[email protected]

      

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Seoullo (Sky Garden), Squid Game Pop-up Playground, Plant (Vegan Café) and COVID-19 Relief Funds

Tue, 2021-09-28 02:11
— From Korea with Love
Chrissantosra.wordpress.com


 

 

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HP Pavilion15 15.6" laptop 8th gen i5

Tue, 2021-09-28 00:31
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: GijangContact person by email

HP Pavilion 15-ck075nr

15.6" FullHD Touch screen - Brand New screen installed.

CPU: i5-8250U 1.6Ghz

RAM: 8GB DDR4

SSD: 128GB nvme m.2

Scratches and dings but works well.

Asking 380,000won

Call or text 010-2833-6637

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Wonhyodae Temple – 원효대 (Gijang-gun, Busan)

Mon, 2021-09-27 23:58
The Samseong-gak Hall at Wonhyodae Temple in Gijang-gun, Busan. Temple History

Wonhyodae Temple is located in Gijang-gun in eastern Busan. Wonhyodae Temple is located up a long valley just to the south-east of Mt. Daleumsan (588.1 m). Wonhyodae Temple is named after the famous monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.), who lived and taught in this part of Busan during the 7th century. In fact, it’s believed that Wonhyodae Temple is located near what was a Silla-era temple named Chwijeongsa Temple, which no longer exists, but was founded by Wonhyo-daesa. And just to the east lies the much smaller Daedosa Temple.

The temple site for Wonhyodae Temple is quite large at nearly 8,000 m2. It was first founded in October, 1898. And it was officially registered as a temple with Gyeongsangnam-do in 1923. The temple is home to half a dozen temple shrine halls, a bell pavilion, and a triad of entry gates.

Temple Layout

You first approach Wonhyodae Temple alongside an offshoot of the neighbouring Ilgwang-cheon River. At the end of this watery offshoot, and down a country road, you’ll find Wonhyodae Temple. Hanging a left towards the temple sign that reads “Wonhyodae – 원효대,” you’ll arrive at the temple parking lot. The first thing to greet you at the temple grounds are a collection of three Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag) statues. The bronze coloured statues are joined to the right by a smaller sized collection of statues. The statues are headed by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is teaching the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha).

Straight ahead, and up a flight of stairs, you’ll next encounter the Cheonwangmun Gate. Inside this temple entry gate are four crudely sculpted statues dedicated to the Four Heavenly Kings. Next, passing through the slender Haetalmun Gate, you’ll finally enter the main temple courtyard at Wonhyodae Temple.

Straight ahead of you stands the rather boxy Daeung-jeon Hall. While understated around its exterior, as soon as you step inside the main hall at Wonhyodae Temple, you’ll be greeted by a row of some nine large statues on the main altar. The three central statues are that of Seokgamoni-bul in the middle, who is joined on either side by Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). This triad is then joined to the right by another triad. This triad is centred by Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise). This central image is then joined to the right and left by Ilgwang-bosal (The Sun Bodhisattva) and Wolgwang-bosal (The Moon Bodhisattva). And to the left of the main triad is yet another triad. This triad of statues is centred by Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). This statue is joined on either side by Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul). These nine statues on the main altar are joined in the left corner by a shrine dedicated solely to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). And hanging on the far right wall is a large Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the left of the Daeung-jeon Hall are two additional temple shrine halls. The first, which can only be entered through a side entrance to the right, is the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. Resting on the main altar is one of the most elaborate one thousand armed and eleven headed statues of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) in all of Korea. To the right hangs a collection of murals dedicated to prominent monks like Wonhyo-daesa. And to the left of the main altar statue of Gwanseeum-bosal rests a triad of statues centred by Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). This triad is then joined on the left wall by a black Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

The other shrine hall in this area is the temple’s Myeongbu-jeon Hall. Stepping inside this temple shrine hall, you’ll notice a black haired statue of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) sitting on the main altar. This statue is joined on either side by the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld). The interior of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall is beautifully adorned with dancheong colours. And hanging on the left wall of the hall is a beautiful, modern Dragon Ship of Wisdom mural.

Between the Gwaneum-jeon Hall and the Daeung-jeon Hall is a glass enclosure that also acts as an outdoor shrine. This glass enclosure acts as both the Yongwang-dang Hall, which is dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King). This enclosure also has a shrine dedicated to an all-white Gwanseeum-bosal. The Yongwang shrine has a seated image of Yongwang, as well as one of the largest murals of the Dragon King. To the right of Yongwang stands a large image of Gwanseeum-bosal. Both are joined by mountain water that flows in and out of the glass outdoor shrine.

The final shrine hall that visitors can explore at Wonhyodae Temple is the Samseong-gak Hall. Located between the Gwaneum-jeon Hall and the Yongwang-dang Hall, and up a bit of a wooded trail, is the location of the shaman shrine hall. The golden lettering above the entry to the Samseong-gak Hall really stands out and penetrates the eyes. Stepping inside the Samseong-gak Hall, you’ll find multiple images of the three most popular shaman deities in Korean Buddhism. Hanging on the far right wall is an older painting dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). To the left, and now on the main altar, you’ll find another older image. This time, this smaller painting is dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). This older mural is fronted by a statue of the same shaman deity, Dokseong. To the left of this mural and statue of Dokseong is another mural dedicated to Chilseong. The large mural in the centre, which is fronted by a triad of statues, is another image dedicated to Chilseong. To the left of this third image of Chilseong is a large statue dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), who holds a large golden ginseng root in his hands. Sanshin is also wearing a large emperor’s crown. On the far left wall, you’ll see another older mural dedicated to Sanshin. This painting of the Mountain Spirit is joined by a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) that’s fronted by a statue of Sanshin.

How To Get There

From the Jwacheon Train Station in Gijang-gun, you’ll need to take a taxi to get to Wonhyodae Tepmle. The taxi ride should take about fifteen minutes, and it’ll cost you around 10,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 7/10

There are several key features to Wonhyodae Temple like the loaded Samseong-gak Hall with the ginseng holding Sanshin. Other beautiful features to the temple is the Yongwang-dang outdoor shrine, the elaborate Gwanseeum-bosal statue, and the Daeung-jeon Hall’s main altar that’s filled with images of both Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. While this temple certainly has a more modern feel to it, and it’s also a bit harder to get to, it’s definitely worth a visit for the true temple adventurer.

A collection of Nahan statues listening to the teachings of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). A look through the Cheonwangmun Gate at Wonhyodae Temple. One of the Four Heavenly Kings inside the Cheonwangmun Gate. The Daeung-jeon Hall at Wonhyodae Temple. A look across the well-populated main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The shrine dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The outdoor shrine dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King) and Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). The mural and statue dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King). And the statue of an all-white Gwanseeum-bosal. A look inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. And the ornate statue dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal inside the Gwaneum-jeon Hall. A look inside the well-populated Samseong-gak Hall at Wonhyodae Temple. And the ginseng-holding statue of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the Samseong-gak Hall. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
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How to use (的) 적 (한자) | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-09-27 15:41

Ever seen a word that ended with 적 (or 적이다, or 적인, or 적으로...) and wondered what that part meant? It's probably the 한자 ending 的, which is read as 적 and can attach to the end of many 한자 words to change their usage. Specifically, 적 can transform a noun into an adverb, an adjective, and a descriptive verb.

Find out what this 한자 means and how to use it in today's newest episode of "Korean FAQ" right here~!

The post How to use (的) 적 (한자) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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How to use (的) 적 (한자) | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-09-27 13:00

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Busan Online Meditation Seminar (Free)

Sun, 2021-09-26 11:25
Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 20:00Location: Event Type: 

From: https://www.meetup.com/busan-meditation/events/280792328/ 

Details

During the lifetime, we face big and small problems, and all the answers to that problems are within oneself.

You can find the answers through meditation by looking back on you and finding the true self.--

Hope we can meditate together and find true happiness.--

WHO
Any English speaker who lives in Busan

WHEN
6th October 8pm at Zoom

What
FREE Online meditation Seminar

We recommend it to people who
- Are interested in meditation
- Want to know how to live a happier life
- Want to reflect on yourself and live a better life
- Have any concerns about future or career

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Squid Game Pop-up Playground at Itaewon Station #shorts

Fri, 2021-09-24 18:47
— From Korea with Love
Chrissantosra.wordpress.com


 

 

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The best thing you can do with $2 at the Han River

Fri, 2021-09-24 16:24

Anyone who visits Seoul will spot the Han River, as it's one of the most popular spots for both tourists and residents. You can go walking, have a picnic (often with fried chicken), and enjoy the scenery. But if you want to see more of the river you'll have to ride a bicycle. Unfortunately, unless you live close to the Han River, it's not likely you'll have your own bicycle once you get there. Fortunately the Korean government operates an app called "Seoul Bike" (called 따릉이 in Korean), which is an easy and cheap way to rent bikes near the Han River. I brought my friend Miru along and we went for a relaxing 2 hour ride.

Say hi to Miru (미루) and tell her Billy sent you! https://www.instagram.com/misoharu_miru/

This video is not sponsored in any way.

The post The best thing you can do with $2 at the Han River appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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The best thing you can do with $2 at the Han River

Fri, 2021-09-24 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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