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Templestay – Hwagyesa Temple (Seoul)

Thu, 2022-10-20 23:33
Templestay at Hwagyesa Temple in Seoul. (Picture Courtesy of the Templestay website). Introduction to Temple

Hwagyesa Temple was first founded in 1522 A.D by the monk Sinwol. Tragically, the temple was destroyed by fire in 1618. It wasn’t until 1866, through financial support from royal elders, that the temple was rebuilt. There are numerous buildings at the temple to enjoy like the Daeung-jeon Hall, the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, and the Samseong-gak Hall. In addition to these buildings, a visitor can enjoy a small spring to the rear of the temple and Hwagye-gol Valley. The spring water from the Oktak-cheon stream is said to have curative properties for skin and stomach ailments.

In total, Hwagyesa Temple offers two distinct Templestay programs. The first is the Only Don’t Know (The Experience Program), which focuses on meditation, Buddhist ceremonies, and bead-making. The other program that the temple offers is the Only Rest (The Relaxation Program), which, as the name of the program kind of hints at, focuses on relaxation.

Directions

On the Seoul subway system, you’ll need to get to line #4 and get off at the Suyu subway station. After going out exit #3, you’ll need to board local Bus #2 for an additional 15 minutes. You’ll need to get off at the Hwagyesa stop.

Templestay Programs

Hwagyesa Temple conducts two different programs for foreign nationals at their temple. The first is the Only Don’t Know (The Experience Program), which is a one night two day program. The other program is the Only Rest (The Relaxation Program), which is also a one night two day experience.

A: Only Don’t Know (The Experience Program) TimeTitle13:30-14:00Arrival and room assignment14:00-15:00Orientation and temple tour15:00-16:20Walking meditation16:20-17:30Dinner17:30-18:00Bell ceremony and evening ceremony18:00-18:20Yebul: Evening service18:20-21:30108 bows and making 108 beads21:30-00:00Lights out TimeTitle04:20-05:00Yebul: Morning service05:00-6:20Meditation06:20-07:20Breakfast07:20-09:00Taking a walk along the Dulle-gil09:00-10:30Tea time with a monk10:30Cleaning and departure time

(This schedule is subject to change)

The facilities at Hwagyesa Temple. (Picture courtesy of the Templestay website). Some more of the facilities at Hwagyesa Temple. (Picture courtesy of the Templestay website). B: Only Rest (The Relaxation Program) TimeTitle13:30-14:00Arrival/Room Assignment14:00-16:20Orientation/Temple tour16:20-18:00Dinner18:00-18:20Evening ceremony21:00-00:00Lights Out TimeTitle04:20-06:20Morning ceremony06:20-09:00Breakfast09:00-10:30Tea time with a monk10:30Cleaning and departure time

(This schedule is subject to change)

Temple Information

Address : 117 Hwagyesa-gil, Gangbuk-gu, Seoul, South Korea

Tel : 82-10-4024-4326

E-mail : [email protected]

Fees

Only Don’t Know (The Experience Program) – adults – 60,000 won; students (up to 18 years of age) – 50,000 won

Only Rest (The Relaxation Program) – adults – 50,000 won; students (up to 18 years of age) – 40,000 won

*The cancellation policy is as follows: 3 days before: 100% refund; 2 days before: 50% refund; 1 day before: 10% refund; day of: 0% refund.

Links

Reservations for the Only Don’t Know (The experience program)

Reservations for the Only Rest ( The Relaxation Program)

Enjoying the Templestay program at Hwagyesa Temple. (Picture courtesy of the Templestay website). —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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Matiz car for Sale

Thu, 2022-10-20 09:39
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: GyeongsanContact person by email

Matiz for Sale.


The car is fantastic and reliable. 
To make sure it is a safe car for driving in the city or on the highway, I spent a great deal of money on it.
New exhaust, 80% tire, 80% brake pad, and a new headlight. It was tested by Transportation Safety (TS) 8 months ago.

It is technically completely healthy and without any defects. The car is absolutely reliable.
There is some rot on both sides of the rear fender and the rocker. You cannot find any problem except it. 
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I would appreciate it if you could send me a message here if you need more information. 

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Email.

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Thank you

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Korean Music Genres – Different Song Categories

Thu, 2022-10-20 01:54

Do you know the different Korean music genres? As a big part of Korean culture, by now, you all probably know exactly what K-Pop is. Undoubtedly, you probably even have a playlist filled with all your favorite K-Pop songs.

Korea has a diverse music scene outside of the most popular idols you may hear on the radio and in mainstream media. If you’d like to know more about these other music genres, then we urge that you keep reading further.

What are Korean Music Genres?

Just like with movies, music also falls under several different genres. A piece of music is given a genre based on some musical elements it contains, which is distinguishable from another genre.

Typically a musician or a band has a specific genre they make music for. However, it is not uncommon or impossible for a song or an album to include influences from multiple different genres.

For example, South Korean popular music is heavily influenced by other genres within its music scene. One of the most notable ways you can see this is many of the groups contain one member specializing in rap, while rap is also its own genre of music.

Similarly, with each group having its own song style set to distinguish them from other groups, one group may lean more towards the rock genre while another group’s songs may lean more heavily toward electronic sounds.

Different Genres in Korean Music

Besides pop music, you can typically find the following music genres: ballad, hip-hop, r&b, indie, rock, and trot. There are also many subgenres of traditional music. Next, let’s take a closer look at each music genre!

Korean ballad

Although in many other music scenes, ballads are considered more of a musical style, in South Korea, it is its own genre. Numerous artists have made impactful careers in Korea by singing ballads only.

The majority of the songs have to do with love and relationships. They can be songs confessing love, or they can be songs about hurt after a breakup. For example, Park Hyo Shin and Im Jae Beom are incredibly popular Korean ballad singers. Korean ballad songs can fit seamlessly together with pop, rock, and even trot music genres.

Korean hip-hop

Besides just being featured in K-Pop songs, hip-hop has grown into a big genre in South Korea, with artists such as Simon D, Epik High, Dok2, Jay Park, and Zico. It’s been around since the 1980s but only started gaining mainstream attention in the 2000s and especially 2010s, with shows like Show Me the Money and Unpretty Rapstar.

One defining element of this genre is the mix of Korean and English in the lyrics, often appearing even in corresponding rhymes.

Korean R&B

Among the different music genres in South Korea, R&B may be a smaller one. Much like hip hop, R&B also originated in the African-American community and then crossed over to the Korean music scene upon gaining mainstream popularity in the USA.

R&B mixes multiple genres into one, from rock to soul, distinguishable often by a heavy beat in the background music, although contemporary R&B may sound quite different from the original sound. Some popular R&B artists in Korea include Dean, Sam Kim, and Lee Hi.

Korean indie and Korean rock

Korean indie music can essentially mean any artist or band that is not signed onto a big label. Their actual musical genre may align with rock or contemporary Korean folk music, although of the two, rock is far more popular.

At the center of rock is the electric guitar, and drums and bass also play an important part. Alongside pop music, rock music is perhaps one of the most diverse music genres.

This genre has been introduced to Korea by the U.S. soldiers who remained at the U.S. military bases in South Korea after the Korean War.

Popular Korean indie and Korean rock artists include Seo Taiji and the Boys, CNBLUE, and Crying Nut.

Korean trot

Korean trot music can actually be regarded as a subgenre of Korean pop music. It is known for its repetitive rhythm in the songs, and its name originated from the foxtrot, although the two share very few characteristics.

As trot is not so popular these days, typically, trot singers mainly perform pop songs. For example, popular K-pop singers such as Daesung and Leeteuk have performed trot songs before.

What makes Korean music Korean?

Traditional Korean music has long roots in the history of the Korean Peninsula as a whole and is and will always remain uniquely Korean. However, contemporary music genres may draw more of their influences from elsewhere. Despite that, Korean music is usually quite identifiably Korean.

First of all, in many Western music scenes, a lot of the artists record songs in English rather than their native language. However, in Korean songs, English only presents a part as lines or words in songs, while the rest of the lyrics are in the Korean language. This typically is only within K-Pop.

Additionally, Korea’s idol format in popular music is another distinguishable factor in Korean music. Of course, Korea’s history and culture are other driving forces in shaping Korean music.

Korean music also has a lot of what is called “lyrical sensibility.” While Koreans may otherwise somewhat refrain from showing their emotions, Korean music instead is full of emotions and expressing them.

What are the influences of Korean Music?

Korean music has been widely influenced by various music from Western culture. Many of the music genres you can hear in Korean music today originated from other countries, although Korea has put its own spin on everything.

All of the different music genres in Korea have also largely influenced the K-Pop industry. It has made the industry quite interesting, as you can hear every genre presented within Korean pop culture.

Korean traditional music has also drawn influences from its neighboring cultures. Most notably, Chinese music and culture have had an impact on Korean traditional music.

With today’s internet culture, you can easily find foreign songs like Korean songs simply by watching a YouTube video. Search for the song titles, watch music videos, and the next thing you know, you’re on the lookout for songs leading the pop charts!

Wrap Up

And there you have the most common music genres in Korea! What kind of music do you like to listen to? How familiar were you with these music genres outside of K-Pop? Let us know below in the comments!

If you’d like to know more about different K-pop groups (boy bands and girl groups), we have a dedicated article for it here.

The post Korean Music Genres – Different Song Categories appeared first on 90 Day Korean®.

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hairdryer, wifi router, brand new galaxy fit watch

Thu, 2022-10-20 01:43
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

Shipping only, anywhere in Korea. All prices includes shipping. Selling these items because I need to downsize. Please message me on kakaotalk (ID: caratlight). Thank you!
 

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Cheonjangsa Temple – 천장사 (Seosan, Chungcheongnam-do)

Wed, 2022-10-19 23:28
The View from Cheonjangsa Temple in Seosan, Chungcheongnam-do. Temple History

Cheonjangsa Temple is located in southern Seosan, Chungcheongnam-do on Mt. Yeonamsan (440.8 m). In English, Cheonjangsa Temple means “Hidden by Heaven Temple.” The reason for this name is that Cheonjangsa Temple is hidden so deeply in the mountain that both the sky and the earth can’t find the temple. Additionally, the temple is classified as Traditional Temple #42. Purportedly, Cheonjangsa Temple was first built in 633 A.D. by the monk Damhwa during the Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.). However, there are no records or relics of the monk Damhwa. What is more likely is that Cheonjangsa Temple was first established some time during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), which can be inferred by the style of the seven-story stone pagoda that stands in the main temple courtyard.

But its Cheonjangsa Temple’s modern history, and its association with the famed Buddhist monk Gyeongheo (1846-1912) that make the temple so special. Not only did Gyeongheo live a long time at Cheonjangsa Temple, but it’s also believed that he attained enlightenment here. Additionally, Gyeongheo’s disciples, Suwol-seonsa (1855-1928), Hyewol-seonsa (1861-1937), and Mangong-seonsa (1871-1946) also became monks and practiced at Cheonjangsa Temple.

As for the temple itself, it is home to provincial cultural properties like the Seven-Story Stone Pagoda, which is Cultural Material #202; as well as the Amitabha Platform Painting, which is Tangible Cultural Property #186. Additionally, there’s a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the main hall from 1896. Also, the main altar painting inside the main hall is from 1788. Originally, it was made for Gwaneumsa Temple; however, it is unknown which Gwaneumsa Temple it was made for.

Temple Layout

You first make your way up a steep side-winding mountain road on your way up to Cheonjangsa Temple. The temple grounds are quite small, and the first thing you’ll encounter along the way is the lotus bud stupa which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the death and entry into nirvana by Gyeongheo in 2016.

Next, you’ll come to the main temple hall at Cheonjangsa Temple. This main hall is a three-in-one shrine hall. The central component to the structure is the Daeung-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this shrine hall are filled with beautiful paintings dedicated to Gyeongheo, Mangong-seonsa, and the Bodhidharma. Entering this low-ceilinged shrine hall, you’ll notice a solitary image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) on the main altar. Also found inside the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) from 1896, an older-looking Chilseong Taenghwa (Seven Stars Mural), and two pictures. One of these pictures is of Gyeongheo, while the other is of Mangong-seonsa.

To the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the temple’s kitchen. You can pass through this older kitchen on your way up to the Sanshin-gak Hall to the rear of the temple grounds. Rather uniquely, the kitchen has a beautiful mural dedicated to Jowang-shin (The Fireplace King Spirit) inside it. Also, and from the kitchen, purportedly Suwol-daesa was absorbed in prayer and radiated light from his body. But before passing through the temple’s kitchen and heading up towards the Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll notice two monk cells. The first is the cell that Mangong-daesa formerly used, while the second was Gyeongheo’s cell.

To the left of these two cells is a rather unique painting that adorns the wall. In this painting, you’ll see a large monk figure. This is Gyeongheo being beaten by four villagers. The painting is referring to a famous story, where he used to test his practice through his actions. These actions were to see if his samadhi (state of meditative consciousness) could remain unshakable even in the most difficult of situations like being beaten by four villagers. Gyeongheo always liked to challenge his practice; and during times of intense practice, Gyeongheo would often wander into villages below Cheonjangsa Temple. There he would beg for alms and make trouble with the villagers. And because Confucianism was still the dominant religion of that time and Buddhism and Buddhist monks were on the lowest rung of the social ladder, Gyeongheo would be punished for his actions and behaviour. It didn’t help that he was typically drunk, wearing dirty clothes, and was unwashed and unshaven. As a result, Gyeongheo was usually pretty severely beaten. And that’s what this painting is meant to represent: the testing of one’s samadhi.

Now passing through the temple’s kitchen and climbing the stone stairs up to the Sanshin-gak Hall to the rear of the temple grounds, you’ll find a shaman shrine hall that has a commanding view of the valley below. The exterior walls to the Sanshin-gak Hall are adorned with simplistic shaman murals. Stepping inside the Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll immediately find that the Sanshin-gak Hall actually functions as a Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall. There are two beautiful shaman murals housed inside this hall dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).

Also standing out in front of the main hall is a seven-story stone pagoda. The pagoda is rather slender and was probably made during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). To the left of the main temple courtyard are a collection of monks’ dorms. And to the right of the main temple courtyard is the modern kitchen at Cheonjangsa Temple.

It should also be noted that there is a slightly overgrown set of stone stairs that lead up and down the mountain from the temple courtyard. There is a weak flowing waterfall next to these stairs. Also, there is a cave near Cheonjangsa Temple where the monk Hyewol-seonsa attained enlightenment while making straw sandals.

How To Get There

From the Seosan Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #540 for 34 stops, or 42 minutes. The bus will drop you off at the “Jangyo 1-ri Jongjeom Hacha – 장요1리종점 하차” stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to head along the “Goyo-dong 1-gil – 고요1길” road for about 500 metres. You’ll then need to head north up “Cheonjangsa-gil – 천장사길” road for an additional 900 metres. This road is the mountainous road that winds its way up Mt. Yeonamsan. The 1.3 km walk should take about 30 to 40 minutes.

Overall Rating: 6/10

This temple is a bit of a difficult one to rate. Obviously because of its close association with famed monks like Gyeongheo and Mangong-seonsa, who helped revitalize and restore the Seon Buddhist tradition, it rates highly. However, because the temple is smaller in size, it rates lower. Besides the seven-story stone pagoda in the main temple courtyard, there isn’t anything historic to see at Cheonjangsa Temple. With that being said, the main hall is surrounded by some pretty special paintings dedicated to Gyeongheo and his disciples. Also, the temple still has both cells left unoccupied that once belonged to two central figures in modern Korean Seon Buddhism. Lastly, the artwork in the Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall, as well as the Daeung-jeon Hall are beautiful.

The stupa commemorating the 100th year anniversary of Gyeongheo’s death. The former cells of Mangong-seonsa (foreground) and Gyeongheo (background). The violent mural of Gyeongheo next to his former cell. The painting dedicated to Jowang-shin (The Fireplace King Spirit) inside the kitchen. The Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall at Cheonjangsa Temple. One of the paintings adorning the outside of the Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall. The painting dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) inside the shaman shrine hall. And the painting dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the shaman shrine hall. The main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. And the historic Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The Bodhidharma mural that adorns the main hall. And the Gyeongheo and Mangong-seonsa mural that adorns the main hall. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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Short Quoting Forms | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2022-10-19 14:34

This past Sunday we had our last live Korean class for this month (until I return from Korea), and the topic was Short Quoting Forms.

The regular quoting forms include forms such as ~다고 and ~라고, but there are also shorter versions of these including ~대요 and ~래요 (and more).

During the class we covered all of these, how they work, how they were shortened, and also covered the verbs 주래요 vs 달래요.

The post Short Quoting Forms | Live Class Abridged appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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Short Quoting Forms | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2022-10-19 13:00

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31 Inch TV

Wed, 2022-10-19 12:00
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Haeundae Contact person by email

Hello all, 

 

I am selling my 31 inch television.

I connect my laptop to it to get Netflix and internet. 

It has three HDMI connections and other connections I have never used. 

I may be able to drop it off if you live near the Haeundae area 

Make me an offer

 

[email protected]

 

 

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Real Korean Conversation | 4.Weekend Plan

Wed, 2022-10-19 07:53

Instagram     YouTube

Hi 안녕하세요 I'm Won!
I hope this channel is helpful

Private Korean lesson (Conversation, Pronunciation, Writing etc)
You can check more detail on my Instagram page

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TOPIK Speaking Test --│ Lecture OT│Kim Mi Sook Teacher--‍--

Wed, 2022-10-19 03:45

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Korean Months: 한 달, 두 달, 석 달, 넉 달... | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2022-10-17 15:30

Sometimes you might hear the words 석 달 and 넉 달 used to mean "3 months" and "4 months," but just exactly what are those for? In this video we'll talk about the words 석 and 넉, as well as how they're used with other words as a counter to mean "3" and "4," and what situations you can do this.

The post Korean Months: 한 달, 두 달, 석 달, 넉 달... | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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URGENT SALE Macbook Pro(m1)

Mon, 2022-10-17 13:57
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: Busan National UniversityContact person by email

Urgent! Selling Macbook Pro 13(Apple M1 chip)

Storage 512GB

Memory 8GB

Battery Cycle: 114

Battery capacity: 97%

Device in perfect shape comes with protective cover and case

Price:  1,200,000 won (negotiable)

If interested feel free to contact via 010 8088 9887 or KakaoID: 199603me

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Korean Months: 한 달, 두 달, 석 달, 넉 달... | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2022-10-17 13:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Real Phrases in Real Life[51~100]

Mon, 2022-10-17 08:18

Instagram     YouTube

Hi 안녕하세요 I'm Won!
I hope this channel is helpful

Private Korean lesson (Conversation, Pronunciation, Writing etc)
You can check more detail on my Instagram page

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Templestay – Jogyesa Temple (Seoul)

Sun, 2022-10-16 23:32
Inside the Main Hall at Jogyesa Temple. Introduction to Temple

Jogyesa Temple is located in Jong-no, Seoul. The name of Jogyesa Temple might sound familiar. It’s the headquarters to the largest Buddhist Order in Korea: the Jogye-jong Order. Jogyesa Temple has a bit of a unique history. The original building that took up residence at Jogyesa Temple was actually transferred from a temple named Gakhwangsa Temple in neighbouring Susong Park in 1938. Gakhwangsa Temple was first founded in 1395. This original structure no longer remains; but during Japanese Colonial Rule from 1910-1945, the temple would grow in importance in its resistance towards the Japanese efforts to suppress Korean Buddhism. It was in 1937 that the resistance movement was started and funding towards Korea’s first Buddhist mission began. At this time, the temple was renamed Taegosa Temple. Only after the Buddhist Purification Movement in 1954 did the temple change its name to its current name of Jogyesa Temple.

Jogyesa Temple provides one Templestay program. It’s the “Be a True Hero!” Recharging Templestay which focuses on Buddhist ceremonies, paper lotus flower making, and a temple tour. It has a diverse schedule that allows for people to experience different aspects of the temple and Korean Buddhism.

For more information on Jogyesa Temple.

Directions

There are three ways that you can get to Jogyesa Temple. The first is from Jonggak Subway Station, line #1. Go out exit #2 and go straight for 70 metres. You’ll need to cross the road and go straight for an additional 100 metres, where you’ll finally find Jogyesa Temple. The second way is by getting off at Anguk subway station, line #3. Go out exit #6 and go straight for 50 metres. You’ll then need to cross the street in front of Dongduk Gallery. The temple is an additional 50 metres past the gallery. The third way a visitor can get to Jogyesa Temple is by getting off at Gwanghwamun subway station, line #5. Take exit #3 and go straight for an additional 150 metres. The temple is between YTN Parking Tower and Hana Bank.

Templestay Program

The “Be a True Hero!” Recharging Templestay Program is a one night, two day program focusing on a temple tour, Buddhist arts and crafts, and Buddhist ceremonies. Here is their schedule:

TimeTitle14:30-14:40Check-in14:40-15:10Introduction Session (learning about regulations, temple etiquette, etc)15:10-16:00Temple Tour (attendance required)16:10-16:50Making Lotus Paper Flowers (attendance voluntary)16:50-17:55Dinner 17:55-18:20Evening Chanting (voluntary attendance)18:20-19:00108 Prostrations (voluntary attendance) TimeTitle04:20-05:00Dawn Chanting (voluntary attendance)08:30-09:30Breakfast (07:30 on Sunday)09:00-10:00Check-out

(The schedule may be subject to change)

Temple Information

Address: 55 Ujeongguk-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea

Tel: 02-768-8523

E-mail: [email protected]

Fees

“Be a True Hero!” Recharging Templestay Program – all ages – 50,000 won.

The cancellation policy is as follows: 7 days before: 100% refund; 1-6 days before: 0% refund.

Links

Reservations for the “Be a True Hero!” Recharging Templestay Program

A picture of Jogyesa Temple from October, 2004. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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₩1,000 CDs

Sun, 2022-10-16 22:05
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Nangmin dongContact person by email

All in perfect condition.

₩1,000 each

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Comfortable Office Chair

Sun, 2022-10-16 11:35
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Nangmin dongContact person by email

Comfortable chair in perfect condition.

₩5,000. Could possibly deliver.

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Civin Guitar, Case & Capo

Sun, 2022-10-16 03:04
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: SuyeongContact person by email

Selling a Civin brand acoustic guitar, generic case and capo in good condition for ₩80,000 total. Available for inspection and pickup at my apartment near Suyeong Station Exit 17. Please message me on KakaoTalk, ID: 'shiraun' for more information.

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