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Hancheonsa Temple – 한천사 (Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Wed, 2024-03-06 23:10
The “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple” at Hancheonsa Temple in Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Hancheonsa Temple is located in the southern foothills of Mt. Jumasan (516.1 m) in northern Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple was first constructed by the monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) in 678 A.D. Originally, the temple was called Handaesae Temple, but it was renamed Hancheonsa Temple in the 1900s.

According to a temple legend recorded in the “Handaesa Temple Chronicle” (1875), which details the history of the temple, the temple was built by Uisang-daesa. In 676 A.D., and after Uisang-daesa built Buseoksa Temple, the erected pillars used to support structures at the temple continued to fall over. Investigating, Uisang-daesa learned that Mt. Jumasan, which is the southern foot of Mt. Sobaeksan (1,439 m), was shaped like the head of a galloping horse. So in order to contain this challenging topography that was interfering with the well-being of Buseoksa Temple, Uisang-daesa decided to construct a temple on Mt. Jumasan. This temple would turn out to be Handaesae Temple (Hancheonsa Temple). Thanks to the construction of Handaesae Temple (Hancheonsa Temple), Buseoksa Temple no longer had any problems with its temple buildings.

Since the construction of Hancheonsa Temple, virtually nothing is known about the temple. It isn’t until 1803 that we learn about the reconstruction of the temple by the monk Geuncheon. Then a Seon Hall was built at the temple in 1808. In 1932, the temple was rebuilt. And it was expanded in 1934 by the monk Deokgi. However, the temple would be completely destroyed during the Korean War (1950-1953). The temple we see today was constructed after the Korean War.

In total, Hancheonsa Temple is home to two Korean Treasures. They are the “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #667; and the “Gilt-bronze Padlocks and Gong of Hancheonsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #1411 and is currently housed inside the temple museum at Jikjisa Temple.

Temple Layout

You first make your way up to the temple grounds up a long backroad. Eventually, you’ll come to the temple parking lot. Mounting the stone stairs, you’ll see an expansive main temple courtyard with trees and grass. To the right are the monks’ dorms and to the left is the administrative office at Hanseonsa Temple. Situated in the temple courtyard is the “Samcheung Seoktap at Hancheonsa Temple.” This three-story stone pagoda is typical of the design from the latter part of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). In total, the pagoda stands 3.6 metres in height. Only two parts of finial still remain intact. It’s believed that the pagoda was first erected at the same time that the “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple” was first enshrined at the temple.

Straight ahead, on the other hand, is the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with beautiful, yet simplistic, Shimu-do (The Ox-Herding Murals). There’s also a smaller bronze ceremonial bell to the front right of the main hall. Stepping inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, you’ll find the stunning “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple” all alone on the main altar. This bronze image of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy) measures 1.53 metres in height. Unfortunately, both the mandorla that surrounds the iron Buddha is missing as is the pedestal that it once sat upon. Despite these two omissions, the “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple” is in excellent shape, especially when one considers that it dates back to the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). The statue has a long upper body with a flat narrow nose. As for its robe, the pleats are quite pronounced especially around the arms and knees. The “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple” is a wonderful example of the iron statues of the Buddha that were prevalent during this time period.

As for the rest of the interior of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, and to the right of the main altar, you’ll find a black and gold Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). And to the left of the Shinjung Taenghwa is a modern mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife), as well as another ceremonial bronze bell with a stunning dragon support with a turtle base. The rest of the interior is richly coloured in dancheong colours.

To the left of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall is the Yaksa-jeon Hall. This newly built shrine hall is plainly adorned in traditional dancheong colours. Stepping inside the diminutive shrine hall, you’ll find a stone statue dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise) on the main altar. To right is an intricate painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal, while to the left is a multi-armed and headed painting dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion).

The final shrine hall that visitors can explore at Hancheonsa Temple is the hillside Samseong-gak Hall. Beautifully perched on a ridge, the Samseong-gak Hall looks down on the rest of the temple grounds from its elevated location. Stepping inside the Samseong-gak Hall, you’ll first notice a white statue between two paintings. This statue is dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). To the left of this white statue of Dokseong is a painting dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And to the right is a rather clunky mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

How To Get There

From the Yecheon Intercity Bus Terminal, you should take the bus that says “Jeung-geo – 증거” on it. Keep in mind, however, that this bus comes infrequently. In total, you’ll need to take this bus for 26 stops, or 50 minutes, and get off at the Jeung-geo bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to head north for 12 minutes, or 850 metres, until you get to Hancheonsa Temple. In total, the entire trip from the Yecheon Intercity Bus Terminal should take about an hour.

Overall Rating: 6/10

Rather obviously, the main highlight to Hancheonsa Temple is the stunning “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple” that dates back to Unified Silla. Outside of this statue, other highlights include the three-story pagoda also from Unified Silla, as well as the mural inside the Samseong-gak Hall dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). Overall, the temple has a very relaxing feeling to it.

The Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The “Samcheung Seoktap at Hancheonsa Temple” with the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall in the background. One of the Shimu-do (The Ox-Herding Murals) that adorns the main hall. A ceremonial bell outside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. A look inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. An up-close of the “Iron Seated Vairocana Buddha of Hancheonsa Temple.” A look up at the beautiful dancheong that adorns the main hall. The Yaksa-jeon Hall and the hillside Samseong-gak Hall. A look inside the Yaksa-jeon Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall at Hancheonsa Temple. The white statue of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) inside the Samseong-gak Hall. The Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) painting inside the Samseong-gak Hall, as well. And the view from the Samseong-gak Hall.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
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Humble Speech (낮춤말) | Live Class Abridged

Wed, 2024-03-06 16:10

Humble Speech is used like Honorific Speech to show extra respect toward someone else, and it does this by "lowering" the speaker metaphorically. It includes both Humble Verbs, and Humble Nouns, and I explain everything you need to know about it in this lesson.

The original live stream was nearly two hours long, but you can re-watch the lesson portion only here in just 11 minutes.

The post Humble Speech (낮춤말) | Live Class Abridged appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Turntable - Audio Technica AT-LPW40WN.

Wed, 2024-03-06 05:35
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: 

Audio Technica AT-LPW40WN turntable. ₩300,000 obo. Has an on-board phono pre-amp. I live in the Gimhae area, but I can possibly deliver and help with set-up. I can also add a Bose speaker, and a Bob Marley Record (Legend) and a Ray Chrles Record (Best of).

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리치먼드 어학원

Tue, 2024-03-05 06:17
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://naver.me/FNmGikJV

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Richmond Academy is committed to giving fun and interactive lessons to adults of all ages- ranging from just graduated high school to recently retired. 

Our comprehensive classes start at the very beginning, where you will learn the basics (the alphabet and basic sentence structure) and culminate in our Free Talking Level classes, where you use the time putting what you have learnt into practice. A comorehensive team of both Korean and western English teachers, Richmond Academy could be your next step in your English learning. 

Come by any time for a consultation ~

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성인 영어회화 리치먼드 어학원 / Adult English Conversation Classes

Tue, 2024-03-05 06:14
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Jangsan Haeundae-gu / 장산 해운대구

^^ 성인 영어 회화 리치먼드 어학원 ^^

^^ Adult English Conversation classes at Richmond Academy ^^

Richmond Academy is committed to giving fun and interactive lessons to adults of all ages- ranging from just graduated high school to recently retired. 

Our comprehensive classes start at the very beginning, where you will learn the basics (the alphabet and basic sentence structure) and culminate in our Free Talking level where you use the time putting what you have learnt into practice. A comprehensive team of both Korean and western English teachers, Richmond could be your next step in your English learning. 

Come by any time for a consultation ~

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Banyaam Hermitage – 반야암 (Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Mon, 2024-03-04 23:12
Banyaam Hermitage on the Tongdosa Temple Grounds in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. Hermitage History

Banyaam Hermitage is located on the Tongdosa Temple grounds in the foothills of Mt. Yeongchuksan (1,081 m) in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. Of the nearly twenty hermitages at Tongdosa Temple, Banyaam Hermitage is the newest. The hermitage was first established in 1999 by the monk Jian.

As for the name of the hermitage, it’s a transliteration of the word “Prajna” in Sanskrit, which means either “wisdom” or “enlightenment” in English. So the hermitage literally means “Wisdom/Enlightenment Hermitage” in English. Additionally, Banyaam Hermitage is in close proximity to Geukrakam Hermitage and Biroam Hermitage on the Tongdosa Temple grounds.

Banyaam Hermitage in November, 2006. Hermitage Layout

As you first make your way up to Banyaam Hermitage, you’ll instantly notice the beautiful forest and towering mountains that surround the hermitage. Banyaam Hermitage is tranquil in every sense of the word.

From the hermitage parking lot, and if you look back, you’ll notice a wooden pavilion. It’s from here that you can rest and enjoy the view across the stream and out towards the lush forest. There’s also a suspension bridge that spans the stream. And if you’re feeling a bit more adventurous, you can go for a hike after crossing this bridge. The entire hermitage grounds are beautifully maintained.

In total, there are three larger buildings on the hermitage grounds. To your left and right are the hermitage’s dorms, administrative offices, and the kitchen at Banyaam Hermitage. But of the three, it’s the central building, the main hall, which will draw most of your attention. Making your way up the uneven stone stairs that lead towards the main hall, you’ll make your way past two seokdeung (stone lanterns). And as you near the main hall, you may notice that the signboard above the central entrance reads Banyabo-jeon Hall in hanja characters. Adorning the exterior walls are two different sets of murals. The upper set are the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals), while the lower set depicts a mother raising her child from birth to adulthood. Also of interest are the two vibrant dragons on either side of the front signboard.

Stepping inside the Banyabo-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad on the main altar. Rather interestingly, there’s no canopy above this triad. As for the triad, and seated in the centre, is a statue of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This central image is joined on either side by Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). To the right of main altar, and hanging on the far right wall, is a modern Shinjung Taneghwa (Guardian Mural). If you look around the main hall, and especially up, you’ll notice a beautiful collection of murals that adorn every surface. Painted on the overhead beams are a pair of blue and yellow dragons, as well as white cranes and ornate phoenixes. Up near the eaves, you’ll find paintings dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha), as well as Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) painting his Haein-do painting.

Behind the main hall, and on the ridge above, is the newer-looking pagoda. The entire hermitage grounds are beautifully framed by the neighbouring peaks of Mt. Yeongchuksan.

How To Get There

From Busan, you’ll first need to get to the Nopo subway stop, which is stop #134. From there, go to the intercity bus terminal. From the intercity bus terminal get a bus bound for Tongdosa Temple. The ride should last about 25 minutes. These buses leave every 20 minutes from 6:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. From where the bus drops you off at the Tongdosa Temple bus stop, you’ll need to walk an additional 10 minutes to the temple grounds west of the bus stop.

From Tongdosa Temple, you’ll need to continue up the main road for another 700 metres, until you come to a fork in the road. Instead of heading straight, turn right and continue heading in this direction for 1.2 km. There are a cluster of hermitages in this area. Find the sign that reads “Banyaam Hermitage – 반야암” and continue heading to the right in this direction until you arrive at the hermitage. The entire walk is 3.5 km, and it could take you up to an hour to walk from Tongdosa Temple to Banyaam Hermitage.

Overall Rating: 4/10

So much about Banyaam Hermitage is the natural beauty that surrounds the hermitage like the tranquil stream to the east and the towering mountain peaks to the north. In addition to all of this natural beauty, the Banyabo-jeon Hall is beautifully adorned, both inside and out, with vibrant murals like the Palsang-do and the Nahan murals. Banyaam Hermitage is the perfect hermitage at Tongdosa Temple to simply relax and unwind. Also, it’s in close proximity to Geukrakam Hermitage and Biroam Hermitage, which are definitely worth a bit of your time, as well.

The view as you first near the hermitage grounds. The tranquil stream to the east of the main hall. The suspension bridge that spans the tranquil stream. One more look at the beautiful stream. A purple lotus flower at Banyaam Hermitage. A look towards the Banyabo-jeon Hall with the peaks of Mt. Yeongchuksan in the background. A closer look at the main hall. Two of the murals from the exterior wall of the mother rearing her child. A closer look at the signboard that reads “Banyabo-jeon Hall” in English. A look inside the atypically named main hall. The modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the main hall. A beautiful crossbeam adorned with a blue and golden dragon. The painting depicting Uisang-daesa painting his Haein-do. And a look up at the eaves will reveal some of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) including the Bodhidharma.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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PT Teacher (Morning or Weekends) F4 Visa

Mon, 2024-03-04 14:49
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: Ulsan/ Busan/Gimhae

Hello,
I'm looking for a part-time job in the mornings (9:00-13:00) or over the weekends. 

A bit about myself:
 - Bachelor's Degree in Science
 - 2 years of experience teaching English, Science and Math to students from kindergarten to high schools.
 - F4 visa with all the documents apostilled 

For further questions, you can reach me through my email ([email protected]).

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Join the ‘Global Supporters’ leading OLIVE YOUNG EXCLUSIVES together!

Mon, 2024-03-04 07:24
Classified Ad Type: Location: 

올리브영 EXCLUSIVES와 함께할 ‘글로벌 서포터즈’를 모집합니다!
Join the ‘Global Supporters’ leading OLIVE YOUNG EXCLUSIVES together!

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Sino-Korean Numbers: A Comprehensive Guide for Beginners

Mon, 2024-03-04 05:40

Welcome to our guide on Sino-Korean numbers! You will learn the basics, like counting from 1 to 10, how to form large numbers, and when to use this number system.

You’ve probably seen Sino-Korean numbers before, they look like this:

1: 일 (il)

2: 이 (i)

3: 삼 (sam)

4: 사 (sa)

5: 오 (o)

This guide will cover all of the Sino-Korean numbers and how they are used in real-life scenarios. We’ll also give you the next steps after you learn this number system.

Let’s get to it!

Quick Summary

There are two number systems used in Korea: The Sino-Korean and Native Korean number systems.

Each number system has different purposes. The Sino-Korean numbers are mainly used for things like reading dates, money or prices, minutes and seconds, or phone numbers in Korean.

We recommend learning Sino-Korean before Native Korean numbers because they are simpler to pronounce and easier to remember.

The Native Korean number system goes up to 99, but Sino-Korean numbers go from 0 to infinity.

Basic Sino-Korean Numbers (1-10)

Here are Sino-Korean numbers from 1 to 10 with romanization in parenthesis.

1: 일 (il)

2: 이 (i)

3: 삼 (sam)

4: 사 (sa)

5: 오 (o)

6: 육 (yuk)

7: 칠 (chil)

8: 팔 (pal)

9: 구 (gu)

10: 십 (sip)

Here are the numbers with example sentences. We’ve included the romanization in parenthesis and the pronunciation guide in brackets.

Note: The numbers are often written in Arabic numerals:

1: 일 (il) – [eel]

1분이면 돼요. (ilbunimyeon dwaeyo)

It’ll only take a minute.

2: 이 (i) – [ee]

화장실은 2층에 있어요. (hwajangsireun icheunge isseoyo)

The bathroom is on the second floor.

3: 삼 (sam) – [sahm]

우리 팀이 3점을 얻었다. (uri timi samjeomeul eodeotda)

Our team got three points.

4: 사 (sa) – [sah]

이 행사는 4개 국가에서 동시에 열린다. (i haengsaneun sagae gukgaeseo dongsie yeollinda)

The event is held simultaneously in four countries.

5: 오 (o) – [oh]
오 분만 기다려줄래? (o bunman gidaryeojullae?)

Can you wait for 5 minutes?

6: 육 (yuk) – [yook]
6 빼기 2는 4이다. (yuk ppaegi ineun saida)

Six minus two is four.

7: 칠 (chil) – [chil]
오늘 최고 온도는 영상 칠 도입니다. (oneul choego ondoneun yeongsang chil doimnida)

The highest temperature today is 7 degrees.

8: 팔 (pal) – [pahl]
8월에 계획 있어요? (palwore gyehoek isseoyo?)

Do you have any plans for August?

9: 구 (gu) – [goo]
지하철 9호선을 타세요. (jihacheol guhoseoneul taseyo)

Take the subway line number 9.

10: 십 (sip) – [ship]

십 킬로미터를 달려본 적 있어요? (sip killomiteoreul dallyeobon jeok isseoyo?)

Have you ever run ten kilometers?

Forming Double-Digit Numbers (11-99)

Heading on to the next level, let’s learn how to count the double-digit numbers.

How to form numbers 11 through 19

Numbers 11 through 19 are formed by adding the numbers 1 through 9 after the word for ten (십, sip).

Pattern: Ten (십) + number

Here’s how it’s done:

11: 십일 (sip-il) – Ten (십) + One (일)

12: 십이 (sip-i) – Ten (십) + Two (이)

13: 십삼 (sip-sam) – Ten (십) + Three (삼)

14: 십사 (sip-sa) – Ten (십) + Four (사)

15: 십오 (sip-o) – Ten (십) + Five (오)

16: 십육 (sip-yuk) – Ten (십) + Six (육)

17: 십칠 (sip-chil) – Ten (십) + Seven (칠)

18: 십팔 (sip-pal) – Ten (십) + Eight (팔)

19: 십구 (sip-gu) – Ten (십) + Nine (구)

The pattern for creating numbers 20 through 99

For numbers from 20 to 99, simply combine the tens (20, 30, 40, etc.) with the units (1 through 9).

For each ten from 20 onwards, use the Sino-Korean number for the multiplier of ten.

Pattern: number + Ten (십)

For example:

20: 이십 (i-sip) – Two (이) + Ten (십)

30: 삼십 (sam-sip) – Three (삼) + Ten (십)

90: 구십 (gu-sip) – Nine (구) + Ten (십)

For numbers between the tens, you add the unit number (1 through 9) to each ten.

Pattern: number + Ten (십) + number

For example:

25: 이십오 (isip-o) – Two (이) + Ten (십) + Five (오) -> + Twenty (이십) + Five (오)

34: 삼십사 (samsip-sa) – Three (삼) + Ten (십) + Four (사) -> Thrirty (삼십) + Four (사)

97: 구십칠 (gusip-chil) – Nine (구) + Ten (십) + Seven (칠) -> Ninety (구십) + Seven (칠)

How to Count Large Numbers in Sino-Korean

Here are the counting units for hundreds, thousands, and beyond in Sino-Korean.

  • Hundreds (백, baek)

백 (baek) is used for the number 100, and the number before 백 indicates the hundreds. For example, 삼백 (sam-baek) is 300, with 삼 for 3.

  • Thousands (천, cheon)

The number 1000 is 천 (cheon), and the number before 천 indicates the thousands. For example, 2,000 is 이천 (icheon), where 이 is 2.

  • Ten Thousand (만, man)

만 (man) represents 10,000 and is a unique unit in Korean. Larger numbers are usually grouped in units of 만 instead of thousands. For example, 50,000 is 오만 (o-man).

  • Hundred Millions (억, eok)

100 million is 억 (eok) in sino-Korean. For larger sums, combine numbers with 억. For example, 400 million is 사억 (sa-eok).

  • Trillions (조, jo)

조 represents 1 trillion (1,000,000,000,000). 6 trillion is 육조 (yuk-jo), where 육 is 6.

What is the difference between Sino and Native Korean numbers?

The difference between the two systems is in their uses. Sino-Korean Numbers are used for dates, minutes, and telling phone numbers and addresses and are common in formal documents.

Native Korean Numbers are used for counting objects, ages, and hours of the day.

Another difference is the range they cover. Native Korean numbers only go up to 99. However, Sino-Korean numbers can go up to very large numbers, making them suitable for expressing quantities in the thousands, millions, and beyond. For this reason, Sino-Korean is the Korean counting system used in Korean currency, which is often in large numbers.

History of Sino-Korean numbers

Sino-Korean words come from Chinese characters. Over a thousand years ago, Chinese characters were introduced to Korea through extensive cultural and political exchanges.

This led to the adoption of Chinese characters (Hanja) in the Korean language. Sino-Korean system includes words from Chinese characters and is used in various parts of daily life.

When to use Sino-Korean numbers

Now that you know each of the Sino-Korean numbers. Here is a list of uses of this Korean number system.

  • Day and month
  • Phone number and address (street and floor number)
  • Minutes and seconds
  • Counting money
  • Sports scores
  • Measurements and temperatures
  • Mathematical operations
Which Korean number system should I learn first?

In our Inner Circle course, we recommend learning Sino-Korean before Native Korean numbers because they are simpler to pronounce and easier to remember. For example, the Sino-Korean number 5, or 오 (o), is easier to say and remember than its Native Korean counterpart, 다섯 (daseot).

Sino-Korean numbers are also more commonly used.

Practical Applications of Sino-Korean Numbers

In practical use, Sino-Korean numbers can express large quantities, especially with money and statistics. For example, 만 (10,000) is particularly common in everyday contexts, especially in pricing, salary discussions, and budgeting.

It is essential to understand these units when dealing with financial, statistical, and historical information in Korean.

Counting Money and Making Transactions

When talking about prices, paying the bill, or receiving change, Sino-Korean numbers are used. For example, if something costs 5,500 KRW, you would say 오천오백 원, and 20,000 KRW (Korean Won) is 이만 원.

Another example is 3,500,000 KRW is expressed as in Korean 삼백오십만 원 (sam-baek-o-ship-man won), and the large unit of 만 is emphasized for clarity.

Using Sino-Korean Numbers for Dates and Time

Years: These large units can be used for telling years. For example, one might describe a historical event that happened in 조선시대, 천팔백육십이 년 (Joseon Dynasty, 1862).

Dates: Koreans use Sino-Korean numbers when talking about the year, month, or day. For example, February 15th, 2024, is 이천이십사 년 이 월 십오 일 (2024년 2월 5일).

Time: For hours, you can use the native Korean numbers, but for minutes and seconds, you use Sino-Korean numbers. For example, 1:15 PM is 오후 한 시 십오 분 (오후 1시 15분).

Sino-Korean Numbers in Addresses and Phone Numbers

Address: You can use Sino-Korean numbers to state the building number and zip code. For example, 서울특별시 강남구 테헤란로 152 번지 (152 Teheran-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul).

Phone Numbers: Sino-Korean numbers are used when giving phone numbers. For example, 010-1234-5678 is 공일공 일이삼사 오육칠팔.

Statistics

A city’s population can also be described using these units, like 일억 이천만 명 (120 million people; il-eok i-man myeong).

조 (trillions) is often used to describe a country’s GDP, e.g., 삼백조 원 (300 trillion won; sam-baek-jo won).

Tips and Tricks for Learning Sino-Korean Numbers

Learn Sino-Korean numbers with some effective strategies. Here are tips, memory aids, common pitfalls to avoid, and ways to apply Sino-Korean numbers to your daily life:

Memory Aids for Remembering Sino-Korean Numbers

Rhymes and Songs: Create or find rhymes and songs that include Sino-Korean numbers. Music can make it easier to remember the sequence of numbers. You can look for Korean children’s songs or educational videos online. Here is an example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5DgmvJRyaM

Grouping: Break down the numbers into groups (1-10, 10-20, etc.) and focus on one group before moving on to the next.

Flashcards: Practicing the numbers randomly using flashcards helps with recall and recognition.

Common Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them

Numbers that have similar sounds, like 이십 (20) and 십이 (12), can be confusing when quickly said in conversation. To overcome this, expose yourself as much as possible to spoken Korean through media or listening exercises. This can help to develop an ear to distinguish the nuances of pronunciation.

Pronunciation practice with audio recordings is also helpful for this. Focusing on pronunciation differences of each number in your own speech will help to build a strong foundation.

Incorporating Sino-Korean Numbers into Daily Practice

Practicing every day is the best way to enhance your knowledge of Sino-Kiorean numbers.

Every day, write down today’s date in the Sino-Korean number system and say it out loud. It will only take 10 minutes, but if you do it for weeks and months, it will help you remember the words.

Label everyday items around your house with tags that have prices written in KRW. This will help you get used to seeing and reading numbers in Sino-Korean.

We also recommend paying close attention to how numbers are used in different contexts when engaging Korean media, such as dates on the news or prices in reality shows.

Interactive Exercises and Practice

Here are some strategies and ideas for practicing Sino-Korean numbers interactively, with practice scenarios and resources for further learning.

Interactive games and quizzes to reinforce learning

Flashcards: Apps like Anki or Quizlet to create or find decks specifically for Sino-Korean numbers. These can include audio clips for pronunciation practice.

Language Learning Apps: Use interactive language exercise apps such as Duolingo, Rosetta Stone, and Memrise to retain your learning of Korean numbers.

Online Quizzes: By taking quizzes on websites like Sporcle and PurposeGames. you can test your knowledge in a fun and interactive way.

Practice scenarios for using Sino-Korean numbers in real-life situations

In the Market: Imagine you’re in a Korean market. Practice how you would ask for prices and quantities using Sino-Korean numbers. For example, “이것 얼마예요?” (How much is this?) and respond with a price, “천오백 원이에요.” (It’s 1,500 won).

Telling Time: Practice setting alarms or telling time to a friend using Sino-Korean numbers. For example, “지금은 오후 두시 삼십분입니다.” (It’s 2:30 PM now).

Phone number exchange: Practice exchanging, writing, and saying phone numbers with a friend or a study buddy using Sino-Korean numbers.

Planning an event: when planning your next meeting with your friend or date, write down the date and time using Sino-Korean numbers. For example, “오월 이십삼일 오전 아홉시 삼십분 (May 23rd, 9:30 AM)” .

Cooking in Korean: when cooking, try using Sino-Korean numbers to measure ingredients (grams, milliliters).

Resources for further practice and learning

YouTube: Look for channels that offer free lessons on Korean numbers and many other topics. Through comments and community engagement, you can practice interactively.

Language Exchange: Platforms like Tandem and HelloTalk allow you to practice Korean with native speakers who can help you with numbers and other aspects of the language in exchange for helping them with your native language.

What to do after learning the Sino-Korean Number System

After learning the Sino-Korean Number System, you can familiarize yourself with the Native Korean Number System. This is used for ages, counting objects, and ordinal numbers in daily conversations. Knowing both number systems and when to use them can enhance your ability to communicate effectively in various contexts in Korean.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Sino-Korean numbers are important when speaking and understanding Korean, as they are used in everyday situations like talking about dates, money, and phone numbers. It can seem difficult to learn at first, but with regular practice and use in your daily life, it will get easier and become more natural.

Whether through games, quizzes, or talking to yourself or with your study buddies, we encourage you to keep practicing. What questions do you have about Sino-Korean numbers? Let us know in the comments below!

The post Sino-Korean Numbers: A Comprehensive Guide for Beginners appeared first on 90 Day Korean.

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 

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Canadian: F5 Visa/Education Degree/Teacher's License/TESOL Certified Seeking P/T morning Position

Sun, 2024-03-03 15:08
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Seogu, Saha Gu, Chung-Gu, Busan Jin Gu, Dong-Gu, GiJang Gun

Energetic and professional Canadian teacher with an F5 Visa, Education degree, teacher's license, 120 hr TESOL Certificate, and proven experience is seeking a morning 8 am to 12 pm part-time position from Monday to Friday and Saturday 8 am to 4 pm. A CV and references can be provided upon request.

Respectfully yours,

Michael

 

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Seeking Travel Buddy for Adoptee Dog to Toronto

Sat, 2024-03-02 02:13
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Busan

Greetings Busanites. I am looking for anyone traveling to Toronto in 3 weeks who would be willing to fly or accompany a sweet dog to be adopted in Canada. All the required paperwork and handling of her will be taken care of course. We are looking for a travel buddy for her. She is a St. Bernard who has found a lovely adoptive family. Please help us get her to Canada and settle into a new home. Please email me for more info! Thank you --

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Working at a Korean company – Your Guide to Success

Fri, 2024-03-01 09:59

Have you ever considered the idea of working at a Korean company? If yes, then one of the things that you should know is that going overtime is normal in Korea.

That’s just one, but we will be sharing a few more important things to know if you’re planning to work in Korea below. Read on!

Quick Summary

Before we go into the lesson, here’s a preview of what you’ll be learning.

Working in a Korean company means you’d most likely have to arrive early and go home late because punctuality and working overtime are deeply ingrained in Korean work culture.

Hanging out with coworkers after work can help you become closer friends outside of work.

If you want to get along well with others at work, learning and adjusting to cultural cues like nunchi and jeong will be very helpful.

8 important things to know when working in Korea

It is important to know the following things when you work at a Korean company.

#01. Don’t be late and get accustomed to working overtime

You really do not want to be late even one minute for your job, as that will easily get noticed and thus get you in trouble. In fact, you may want to prefer to show up even 10 minutes early. Additionally, you may already be familiar with the concept that Koreans often tend to stay at work for at least one more hour after their work time has officially ended for the day. So, be prepared to do that!

However, before you get all stressed out, not every company adheres to this unspoken rule. Especially modern, newer companies with younger top personnel don’t consider this a requirement. This doesn’t mean you actually have so much work to do you can’t get out on time.

Instead, you may find yourself taking online courses, planning vacations, reading news, and whatnot while on the clock, just to make the time pass until it’s OK to leave.

Do pay notice, though, that even when it is not required, many Korean employees tend to stay overtime, that’s how deeply ingrained this is in Korean work culture. This overtime notion often comes from the fact that workers feel obligated to stay until their supervisors have also left the office for the day.

Don’t forget to anticipate unpaid overtime and the expectations that come with your first job, as these are common in South Korean work environments. In a few years, you’ll probably get used to the unique aspects of South Korean culture and thrive in your career.

2. Get ready to spend time with your co-workers after work

Besides staying late in the office, it is also incredibly common for co-workers to go out together for food, drinks, and karaoke after work hours. They are often regarded as mandatory to attend for at least one round, although less so at modern companies with younger leaders.

How these after-work dinners are conducted depends entirely on the company and possibly even the team and department within a company. Some teams may go out for these dinners once a week, while for others, it’s more of a special occasion that is held once a month.

Also, with the emergence of newer companies with more modern ways of thinking, some teams may opt to enjoy lunch together instead of dinner and drinks.

3. Personal relationships between co-workers are encouraged

Something that perhaps becomes clear from the previous point already is that in every Korean office, having close interpersonal relationships with your colleagues is a treasured concept.

Within Korean companies, it is believed that trust between employees is one of the most important things, contributing to a strong team player dynamic.

In other words, it may not be possible to keep your work and personal life as separated in Korea as you might be able to do in another country. Building friendships with your colleagues is also one way in which you are showing your commitment to the company and fostering a healthy work-life balance.

However, while these relationships are encouraged, you must still remember to take into account each colleague’s office rank, especially in South Korea. If they rank higher than you, you’ll need to keep in mind the additional layer of respect that comes with it.

4. Cultural concepts stand strong within Korean companies

We’ve already learned about Korean concepts before. This means unspoken concepts that drive behavior patterns, like nunchi, gibun, and jeong. They are strongly present in every Korean’s daily life.

Thus, they also act accordingly in the workplace. This essentially means trying to show oneself to others in a particular light, putting harmony with others above all else, having a high level of situational awareness, and so on.

Many of these cultural concepts are similarly present in other Asian cultures, so it is incredibly important to be aware of them before stepping into the office. Of course, just because you want these concepts to guide your behavior in the workplace doesn’t mean you need to give up your identity or personality to them entirely.

5. You will likely get to take part in membership training

Membership training, MT for short, is one of the major differences in the Korean work culture. It is not something that you come across only at work, as many university clubs arrange these as well.

Basically, you will head over to the mountains or the countryside to stay in a pension (a type of guesthouse) over the weekend. Once there, you’ll do some sports or play games, likely eat barbecued food, and drinking is absolutely a big part of it all.

In other words, there’s not a whole lot of actual training involved; it’s more so a weekend for bonding and experiencing the unique office environment.

6. Remember to use the correct titles in the office

Even if someone is your close friend or has a romantic interest outside of the office, you will not want to use those terms at work.

Instead, always use the correct titles to refer to them, whether that’s -씨 or -님 or something more specific to their position. In general, it is good Korean business etiquette to use these titles to avoid making many mistakes.

7. You shouldn’t question your superior

This may be a conflicting matter to understand and also doesn’t necessarily take place in every company. However, typically in team meetings, your superior will introduce you to a strategy, idea, or concept, and regardless of what you think of it, you shouldn’t disagree with it.

Unlike in Western countries, where challenging a superior’s idea may be a productive and efficient way of working, it is not so in South Korea. This again goes back to concepts such as harmony, which are deeply ingrained in Korean society and work culture.

Besides the team leader, you will also want to be careful about challenging a colleague in the company who has seniority over you. One of the reasons for this is the strong hierarchy within the company, which is a big thing in Korean work culture.

Another one is that your superior likely has another person to report to, from whom they already got approval for this particular strategy.

Thus, it is also the strategy that needs to be presented in the end, whether it worked or not, aligning with the established working environments.

#08. The more Korean you speak, the better

If you are teaching English in Korea, you may be discouraged from communicating in Korean, especially around the students. However, in any other Korean environment, it’s absolutely an advantage to be able to communicate in Korean.

It is a sign of respect towards your colleagues and the country, but you may also have some co-workers who can’t speak English or some other language that you are more comfortable with than Korean.

Knowing and using Korean will make it easier to bond with those around you and navigate the intricacies of Korean culture and the Korean language in the workplace. However, if you have language skills besides Korean, they may also prove to be useful in the long run.

For example, you may be given tasks revolving around that language, which other employees cannot do. This can open up opportunities for learning Korean and improving your working hours and overall experience in the Korean work environment.

Wrap Up

So, that’s the scoop on working for a company in South Korea! Remember, fitting in means understanding how things work. And don’t forget about those cultural customs – they’re a big deal, especially in South Korean culture!

Whether you’re dreaming of joining a K-Pop giant or a big-name company like Samsung, knowing the ropes of Korean corporate culture will help you shine. So, dive in, stay true to yourself, and enjoy the adventure!

With these tips, you’ll be sure to get started on your journey of working in South Korea! Do you think the Korean company life is for you? Next, you may want to learn how to actually get a job in Korea, brush up on business Korean, or study the vocabulary for jobs in Korean.

The post Working at a Korean company – Your Guide to Success appeared first on 90 Day Korean.

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 

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Korean classes in March!

Fri, 2024-03-01 04:19
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: pnu haeundae seomyon ksu bsu jangsan

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

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Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

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Tailoreea

Fri, 2024-03-01 03:50
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://blog.naver.com/tailoreea

Busan tailor-made suit shop Tailoreea
We specialize in tailored suits, but also do casual shirts and coats. You can choose from a wide range of fabrics in a wide range of price points. At Tailoreea you will find exactly what you want! Starting price is around 500,000 KRW.
 
We have experience working with foreign customers and are confident you will be satisfied with our price and quality! We hope to see you at Tailoreea.
 

Location: 2F, 35, Centum dong-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan, ROK 

Easily DM me on instagram(@tailoreea) or E-mail ([email protected])

Thank you

 

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Koreans Answer: What would you do if you suddenly got a million dollars?

Thu, 2024-02-29 16:58

During my last trip to Korea I visited Seoul and asked people what they would do if they suddenly became rich. I was expecting them to all say that they would buy something expensive, but the answers were different. Many people said they wanted to invest their money. Here are all of their answers.

The post Koreans Answer: What would you do if you suddenly got a million dollars? appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Teachers: Need a Curriculum for New Idioms?

Thu, 2024-02-29 10:09
Classified Ad Type: 

Available for free, I've put together supplemental stories from the book Can You Believe It? Stories and Idioms from Real Life

 

These books are so popular, they've been reprinted for 2023. The old books are available online (links included), so there's no cost and the best part, they're still good.

 

Students can practice English in a familiar setting. They can retake the quizzes as much as they like.

 

Idioms Adapted to Korean Life – business news english

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Daeseungsa Temple – 대승사 (Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Wed, 2024-02-28 23:37
Daeseungsa Temple in Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Daeseungsa Temple is located on Mt. Sabulsan in northern Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Daeseungsa Temple means “Great Vehicle Temple” in English. The temple was first established in 587 A.D., and it was the first Buddhist temple ever built in Mungyeong.

Daeseungsa Temple has one of the more interesting origin legends. According to the Samguk Yusa, or “Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms” in English: “To the east of Juknyeong (Bamboo Pass) about one hundred li [500 meters] away, soaring high into the sky, there stands a mountain. In the ninth year of King Jinpyeong of Silla [r. 579-632 A.D.], the year of the monkey (587 A.D.), this mountain shook with a thundering sound, and from its peak in the heavens a great rock fell. It was ten feet square, carved with Buddhist images on all sides, and wrapped in a red silk cloth.

“Hearing of this marvelous event, the King journeyed to this place. There he prostrated himself before the wonderful rock and ordered a temple built nearby, calling it Daeseungsa Temple [Great Vehicle Temple, or Mahayana Temple]. A monk who had recited the Lotus Sutra all his life was put in charge of the temple and told to burn incense before the four Buddhas day and night without stopping once. The mountain was called Mt. Sabulsan [Four Buddhas Mountain]. When the monk died and was buried, a lotus flower bloomed on his grave.”

The temple would later be destroyed by fire during the Imjin War (1592-98). It was later rebuilt from 1604 to 1701. At this time, over a dozen shrine halls and gates were rebuilt. And since it was rebuilt, the temple suffered additional fires including those in 1862 and 1956. The only shrine halls to survive the 1862 fire were the Myeongbu-jeon Hall and the Eungjin-jeon Hall. The Daeung-jeon Hall and a few other shrine halls were rebuilt in 1966.

In total, there are three hermitages that are directly associated with Daeseungsa Temple. They are Myojeogam Hermitage, Yunpilam Hermitage, and Sangjeogam Hermitage.

In total, Daeseungsa Temple is home to a National Treasure and three additional Korean Treasures. The National Treasure is the “Wooden Amitabha Buddha Altarpiece at Daeseungsa Temple,” which is National Treasure #321. As for the Korean Treasures, they are the “Wooden Amitabha Buddha Altarpiece and Related Documents of Daeseungsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #575; the “Gilt-bronze Seated Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva of Daeseungsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #991 ; and the “Gilt-bronze Seated Amitabha Buddha and Excavated Relics of Daeseungsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #1634.

Temple Layout

You first make your way towards the Daeseungsa Temple grounds up a long mountain road. Along the way, you’ll pass by the rather slender Iljumun Gate, until you eventually arrive at the temple parking lot. From the temple parking lot, you’ll need to hang a right and head towards the Baekryeon-dang Hall. This natural wood gate also acts as dorms for visitors. Beyond the Baekryeona-dang Hall, you’ll find the imposing Manse-ru Pavilion. But before passing under the Manse-ru Pavilion, have a look to your left. There you’ll find the Beomjong-gak Pavilion. Housed inside this bell pavilion is a large, golden Brahma Bell. This bronze bell is joined by the three other traditional Buddhist percussion instruments.

Back at the Manse-ru Pavilion, you’ll pass under the first story of the structure and the wooden posts that support the weight of the second story. Having passed under the Manse-ru Pavilion, and looking back, you’ll notice that the Manse-ru Pavilion’s second story acts as a hall for larger dharma talks.

Looking straight ahead, you’ll see the Daeung-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to the Daeung-jeon Hall are adorned with fading Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals), as well as a stunning collection of floral latticework. Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find yourself in the presence of the National Treasure at Daeseungsa Temple, the “Wooden Amitabha Buddha Altarpiece at Daeseungsa Temple.” This main hall altarpiece was first produced in 1675. This altarpiece portrays the Western Paradise of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). In total, it contains 24 images of Bodhisattvas, Nahan, and the Four Heavenly Kings. And in the centre of the symmetrically positioned images is Amita-bul. Of the extant wood altarpieces, this is the oldest. Additionally, it’s the largest of the six historic wood altarpieces still in existence. What distinguishes this altarpiece from the other five is the portrayal and style of the Bodhisattvas. Unfortunately right now, there’s only a reproduction picture of the historic altarpiece hanging on the main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. It’s unclear where the original might be or when it might return to Daeseungsa Temple.

Joining this stunning wood altarpiece inside the Daeung-jeon Hall are a set of Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life) adorning most of the interior surfaces of the main hall. Additionally, you’ll find a modern, red Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) hanging on the far left wall.

To the left and right of the main hall are the monks’ dorms and meditation centre at Daeseungsa Temple. It’s to the right rear of the main hall that you’ll find five additional shrine halls. The first of these shrine halls is the Samseong-gak Hall. The interior and exterior walls to this shaman shrine hall are adorned with Sinseon (Taoist Immortal) paintings. As for the interior, there are three golden reliefs, similar to the main altarpiece inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, of the three most popular shaman deities in Korea. They are of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), Dokseong (The Lonely Saint), and Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

To the right of the Samseong-gak Hall, you’ll find the Eungjin-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with beautiful paintings dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). Stepping inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall, you’ll find wall-to-wall images of the Nahan. And resting on the main altar is a diminutive triad centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). On the far right wall, you’ll find a crowned image dedicated to Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings), which is backed by a painting dedicated to Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power).

Next to the Eungjin-jeon Hall is the Josa-jeon Hall. And out in front of these two halls is the temple’s Geukrak-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with murals of guardians, Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise), Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion), and Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul). Stepping inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad resting on the main altar. In the centre is the “Gilt-bronze Seated Amitabha Buddha and Excavated Relics of Daeseungsa Temple.” This Korean Treasure is believed to date back to 1301, when an inscription on its head, written in ink, was found during a recent examination of the statue. When the statue was inspected by x-ray, the bead decorations on top of its head was discovered to be made of cast bronze like the rest of the statue. In the late 13th century, through to the 14th century, Buddhist sculptures in the Tibetan style with Yuan influence were popular in the Gaeseong area. Rather interestingly, this statue displays the characteristics of an earlier mid-Goryeo Dynasty tradition. Additionally, there were votive documents found inside this statue. They were comprised of twelve sheets, and they were printed between 1292 to 1301. Also taking up residence inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, and hanging on the far right wall, is a modern mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

The final shrine hall that visitors can explore, and one of the oldest at the temple, is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior is adorned with fading guardian murals. Stepping inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, you’ll find the main altar occupied by a green haired image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). Rounding out the interior of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall are ten seated wooden images of the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld), as well as standing wooden guardians at both entries of the shrine hall.

How To Get There

While it’s possible to get to Daeseungsa Temple from Mungyeong, it’s extremely difficult. But if you don’t mind an adventure and spending a lot of time on Korean buses, then here’s how to get to Daeseungsa Temple. From the Mungyeong Bus Terminal, you can take either Bus #11-1, Bus #10-1, Bus #20-1, or Bus #60-2. You’ll then need to get off at the the “Jeomchon Shinae Bus Terminal.” From this stop, you’ll need to take Bus #51-1. With this bus, you’ll need to get off at the “Jeonduguam” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk one hour and ten minutes, or 3.1 km, to get to the temple. And this walk is mostly uphill. In total, this entire trip takes about four hours.

Another way you can get to Daeseungsa Temple is by taxi, but it’ll be expensive. From the Mungyeong Bus Terminal, a taxi to Daeseungsa Temple will take about 50 minutes, or 37 km, and it’ll cost you 50,000 won (one way).

Of course the easiest way to get to get Daeseungsa Temple is owning your own vehicle, but this isn’t always an option for everyone. So whatever way you decided to get to this temple, best of luck!

Overall Rating: 8/10

The main highlight to Daeseungsa Temple are all the treasures with the golden “Wooden Amitabha Buddha Altarpiece at Daeseungsa Temple” being the best of the lot. Beyond what’s located inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you can also enjoy the golden reliefs inside the Samseong-gak Hall, the 700 year old “Gilt-bronze Seated Amitabha Buddha and Excavated Relics of Daeseungsa Temple” inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, as well as the interior of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall and the golden Brahma Bell inside the Beomjong-gak Pavilion. There’s a lot to see, enjoy, and appreciate at Daeseungsa Temple so take your time.

The slender Iljumun Gate at Daeseungsa Temple. The Baekryeon-dang Hall with the Manse-ru Pavilion behind it. Passing through the Baekryeon-dang Hall heading towards the Manse-ru Pavilion The Manse-ru Pavilion. A snowy Beomjong-gak Pavilion. The Beomjong-gak Pavilion with the golden bronze bell at Daeseungsa Temple. The view from next to the Beomjong-gak Pavilion. The Daeung-jeon Hall. One of the fading Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals) that adorns the Daeung-jeon Hall. Some of the beautiful floral latticework that adorns the Daeung-jeon Hall. The amazing “Wooden Amitabha Buddha Altarpiece at Daeseungsa Temple,” which is National Treasure #321 and housed inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. Unfortunately right now, it’s only a picture of the original. The Samseong-gak Hall. The golden relief dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) located inside the Samseong-gak Hall. Joined by this equally golden relief of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). A mural dedicated to Bukseong (The North Star) inside the Samseong-gak Hall. One of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) paintings that adorns one of the exterior walls of the Eungjin-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall. A side altar inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall dedicated to Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) with a mural of Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) behind the side altar. The Geukrak-jeon Hall at Daeseungsa Temple. The triad inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. “The Gilt-bronze Seated Amitabha Buddha and Excavated Relics of Daeseungsa Temple” inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, which is Korean Treasure #1634. A fading guardian mural that adorns one of the exterior walls of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall with a green haired image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) in the centre. And the “Gilt-bronze Seated Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva of Daeseungsa Temple,” which is located in the off-limits Seon centre at Daeseungsa Temple. (Picture courtesy of the CHA). One last look at a snowy Daeseungsa Temple before heading home.—

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Kindergarten and Hakwan Kimhae and Jangyu

Wed, 2024-02-28 11:30
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: Kimhae- Jangyu

Looking for kindy or hakwan classes. I am available in the mornings and some afternoons. PM me, if interested. or phone 01031207766 Rich

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A Licensed English-Speaking Realtor in BUSAN

Wed, 2024-02-28 06:38
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://blog.naver.com/geum_don

Hi, everyone here.

We are a real estate that provides English interpretation and English contracts.

We are located near Pusan National University and carries out various types of real estate contracts such as studios, share house, apartments, shops, ect.

We also provide English interpretation services for international students and foreign customers.

When writing a contract, we serve to mediate by providing a translation service when it is difficult to communicate between the lessor and the tenant and to add special contracts or explain them.

We will help you to the end so that you can sign a contract safely in Korea.

If you have any questions, please contact the contact information below.

Thank you.

Homepage: https://blog.naver.com/geum_don

Tel: 010.4499.8283

KAKAO TALK: geumdon

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14th floor Apartment for Rent (2 Duplex Lofts + 1 Bedroom) 500/80

Wed, 2024-02-28 00:14
Classified Ad Type: Location: 

 

 

- A quiet 1 room with 2 duplexes so a 3 room effect. Lofts are not crawling spaces! Great space for couples, single, or a bargain if you and your friends want to do shared housing/roommates!

- 1 kitchen with open concept living room that includes TV

- 1 bathroom that's modern with a bidet

- Deposit : 5,000,000 Won

- Monthly rent : 800,000 Won (Additional Maintenance Fee not included)

- Furnished: Large flat screen TV, air purifier, air conditioner, fridge, washing machine, microwave, 3 stove tops, closet with dehumidifier, smart home system, and bidet.

- Location: Beomnaegol station and 5-10 minutes from Samjung Tower, shake shack in Seomyeon. So you're in the center of the city that's walking distance to lots of places to eat and shop! (Convenience stores, laundry mat, and cafes are below.)

- Move-in: Starting March 3, 2024

* Contact : 010-8302-6735 / send email to this Korea bridge post

* Internet contract can be available for transfer (₩35,000 a month)

*Some furniture pieces of current renter are also available to have if needed like stools, air mattress, side tables, and Queen sized bed.

 

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