Koreabridge

Subscribe to Koreabridge feed
Updated: 2 hours 30 min ago

Live Korean Class -- [Beginner] Hope & Wish ~(으)면 좋겠다

Fri, 2022-12-16 00:14

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Dasolsa Temple – 다솔사 (Sacheon, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Thu, 2022-12-15 23:15
The Jeokmyeol-bogung at Dasolsa Temple in Sacheon, Gyeongsangnam-do. Temple History

Dasolsa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Bongmyeongsan (407.1 m) in Sacheon, Gyeongsangnam-do. Dasolsa Temple was first constructed in 503 A.D. by the Indian monk Yeongi, who also founded Hwaeomsa Temple in 544 A.D. Originally, the temple was called Yeongaksa Temple. The temple would change its name to Dasolsa Temple in 636 A.D. Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) would then change the temple’s name to Yeongbongsa Temple in 676 A.D. Over a hundred years later, the temple would change its name, once more, during the reign of King Gyeongmun of Silla (r. 861-875 A.D.) by the famed monk Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.). The temple was repaired in 1326 to only be completely destroyed by the invading Japanese during the Imjin War (1592-1598) in 1592. The temple would eventually be rebuilt in 1680. In total, Dasolsa Temple has been destroyed by fire three times in its long history with the most recent occurring in December, 1914. The only structure not destroyed at this time was the entryway’s Daeyang-ru Pavilion.

On February 8th, 1978, 108 sari (crystallized remains) were found inside the Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) that was located in the Eungjin-jeon Hall at Dasolsa Temple. Afterwards, these sari, which are believed to be those of the Buddha’s, Seokgamoni-bul, were enshrined behind the Daeung-jeon Hall in 1979. Like Hwaeomsa Temple and Yongyeonsa Temple, Dasolsa Temple is considered a Jeokmyeol-bogung (a shrine containing the sari of the Buddha placed there by Jajang-yulsa or others).

In total, it’s believed that such luminaries as the monk Yeongi, Jajang-yulsa (590-658 A.D.), Uisang-daesa, and Doseon-guksa have called the temple home at one point or another. Dasolsa Temple is also home to the Hanging Painting of Dasolsa Temple, which is a National Registered Cultural Heritage.

Temple Layout

When you first arrive at the temple, it’s a bit confusing as to where you should head. It isn’t the best marked. However, the easiest way to get to the temple grounds is to head left towards the temple washroom in the temple parking lot. You can also head right, but this is a roundabout way of getting to the main temple courtyard.

Climbing the first set of stairs that leads up towards the temple courtyard, you’ll be greeted by the Daeyang-ru Pavilion, which was first built in 1748 for religious events. This pavilion is unique because it lacks inner pillars; instead, it’s simply supported by a girder system that’s nothing more than ten metres long. There are some beautiful scenic paintings that adorn the exterior of this pavilion.

To the left of the Daeyang-ru Pavilion, you’ll enter into the main courtyard at Dasolsa Temple. As you enter the main courtyard, you’ll be greeted by the Daeung-jeon Hall. To the right of this main hall are the monks’ dorms and the administrative office. Surrounding the exterior walls of the Daeung-jeon Hall are a set of Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life). Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll instantly be struck by the window that is placed on the main altar and looks out towards a stone lotus bud that houses the sari of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This is the temple’s Jeokmyeol-bogung. This window is reminiscent of the one at Tongdosa Temple and its Daeung-jeon Hall. The Dasolsa Temple window is beautifully framed by Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities) and a golden reclining Buddha who is preparing to enter Nirvana. As for the rest of the interior of the Daeung-jeon Hall, there is a stunning Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) to the left of the main altar.

To the immediate right of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Geukrak-jeon Hall. This temple shrine hall was rebuilt in 1910. Resting on the main altar, and backed by a beautiful mural of the Buddha, is Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Rather interestingly, the rest of the Geukrak-jeon Hall is filled with images of shaman deities. To the immediate left of the main altar is that of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And next to Sanshin are murals dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And to the right of the main altar is a mural dedicated to the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld). And next to the Siwang is another mural dedicated to Amita-bul.

To the left of the Geukrak-jeon Hall is the temple’s Eungjin-jeon Hall, which is dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). This hall was rebuilt in 1690. And it was rebuilt, once more, in 1930. As you step inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall, you’ll by welcomed by sixteen statues of the Nahan, as well as a main altar image dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul.

Finally, and to the far left rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall, is a stone shrine dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). The stone tablet reads, “Im-yeong-san-wang-seok,” or “a monument for the King of Mt. Imyeong” in English (special thanks to David Mason for this). This stone tablet is surrounded by the tea bushes for which Dasolsa Temple is also famous for.

How To Get There

From the Sacheon Intercity Bus Terminal, it seems like the only way to get to Dasolsa Temple is to take a taxi because there’s no direct bus to get you there. The trip from the bus terminal takes about 33 minutes, or 28 km, and it’ll set you back about 35,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 8/10

Dasolsa Temple is one of the very few temples in Korea to claim to be one of the historic Jeokmyeol-bogung temple; and for that reason alone, it rates as highly as it does. In addition, the Daeyang-ru Pavilion is beautiful, as are the shaman murals inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The temple has a rare stone tablet dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit); and if you have the time, a cup of tea from the temple is definitely worth it, as well.

The Daeyang-ru Pavilion at Dasolsa Temple. The Daeung-jeon Hall with a window that looks out onto the Jeokmyeol-bogung. And the view from inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, as well. The Geukrak-jeon Hall at Dasolsa Temple. The interior of the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The beautiful Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) mural inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. Which is joined by this Siwang (Ten Kings of the Underworld) mural. And a closer look at Amita-bul (Buddha of the Western Paradise) inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The Eungjin-jeon Hall at Dasolsa Temple. And 8 of the 16 Nahan (Historical Disciples of the Buddha) statues inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall. The stone tablet dedicated to Sanshin to the left rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Geodonsa-ji Temple Site – 거돈사지 (Wonju, Gangwon-do)

Wed, 2022-12-14 23:29
The Three-Story Stone Pagoda at Geodonsa Temple Site in Wonju, Gangwon-do. Temple Site History

The Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is located to the southwest of Mt. Hyeongyesan (535.6 m) in Wonju, Gangwon-do. It’s believed that the temple was first constructed around the 9th century during late Silla (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). It was later expanded and repaired in the early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). And the temple was kept operational until the early Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). During archaeological work on the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site, a middle gate, pagodas, a main hall, a lecture hall, monks’ dorms, and wide corridors were all discovered.

Geodonsa Temple was the headquarters for Beopan-jong Order, which was a fusion of Seon Buddhism and Hwaeom Buddhism. It was first founded by the monk Munik (885-958 A.D.). His teachings were popular during the early Goryeo Dynasty. However, with its eventual decline, it was absorbed into the Cheontae-jong Order by the mid-Goryeo Dynasty.

The Geodonsa-ji Temple Site has a bit of an interesting design in that it only has one pagoda, which was rare at a Silla-era temple, since most had two pagodas stationed out in front of the main hall. And the Three-Story Stone Pagoda at Geodonsa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #750, is assumed to have been constructed at the very same time that the temple was first established.

To the east of the main hall site and the three-story pagoda, you’ll find the Stele for State Preceptor Wongong at Geodonsa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #78. The stele is dedicated to Wongong-guksa (930-1018 A.D.). The inscription on the stele was written by Choe Chung (984-1068). And the stele reads, “When Gwangjong [of Goryeo, r. 949-975 A.D.] ascended the throne, he revered Buddhism and explained the truth of Snow Mountain [Seollyeong, where the Buddha prayed], displaying supernatural effects in order to seek the real Buddha of Danxia [refers to Danxia Tianran (737-824), who purportedly found the sari of the Buddha in the ashes of a wooden Buddha statue he had burned], and implemented the monastic examination.”

Here’s a little more on the cryptic meaning behind the reference to Danxia Tianran, who was a disciple of Shitou Xiqian. During Danxia’s travels, he stopped one day at Huilin Temple. It was really cold, but there was no wood to burn for warmth. Unable to bear the cold any longer, Danxia entered the prayer hall at Huilin Temple, took the wooden statue of the Buddha on the altar, and burned it to heat the room. The abbot of the temple got angry and scolded Danxia and said, “How is it possible that a monk burns a statue of the Buddha?” Without offering an answer, Danxi went to the fireplace where he had burned the statue of the Buddha, holding a stick, he searched the ashes, only to discover the sari of the Buddha. The monk reprimanded him, asking Danxia how it was possible to find sari of the Buddha from a wooden statue. Danxia replied that if no sari could be found, then he would take the other statues from the other halls, as well, to use as fire wood. This story is recorded in the “Jingde chuandeng lu” or “Record of the Transmission of the Lamp in the Jingde Period” in English.

And next to the Stele for State Preceptor Wongong at Geodonsa Temple Site originally stood the Stupa of State Preceptor Wongong from Geodonsa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #190. However, during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-1945), the stupa was kept at a Japanese house. Later, and in 1948, after Japanese Colonial Rule, the stupa was moved to Gyeongbokgung Palace. And now, it’s housed at the National Museum of Korea.

In total, the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is home to three Korean Treasures; one of which, as already mentioned, is housed at the National Museum of Korea. Also, the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is Historic Site #168.

The Three-Story Stone Pagoda at Geodonsa Temple Site from 1912. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). The Stupa of State Preceptor Wongong from Geodonsa Temple Site at a Japanese residence. The picture was taken between 1909-1945 (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple Site Layout

The Geodonsa-ji Temple Site has a massive area of some 25,339 m2. The temple site is located on a elevated plateau with a handful of Korean Treasures spread throughout the grounds. The first of these Korean Treasures is the Three-Story Stone Pagoda at Geodonsa Temple Site. The three-story pagoda is supported by a three-layered base consisting of a bottom, middle, and top, each of which consists of four separate pieces of stone. The top of the base is unadorned, while the pillar-shaped stones are inserted horizontally in the middle section. The core stones and roof stones of the body are each created from a single stone. The roof stones curve upwards swiftly on each of their corners. As for the finial, all that remains of it is the square base for decoration. More recently, a large lotus bud has been attached to the finial. Overall, it’s believed that the three-story pagoda was built during the 9th century.

To the rear of the three-story pagoda is the foundation for the Geumdang-ji Hall, which was the main hall at the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site. Now all that remains of the main hall, besides the elevated stone structure that the Geumdang-ji Hall once stood upon, are stone supports on the ground of the former shrine hall and a central stone altar that is largely damaged and stands two metres in height. To the east of the Geumdang-ji Hall is the elevated eastern corridor and gate. To the rear of the Geumdang-ji Hall, and slightly up the embankment, is what looks to be a large lecture hall in accordance with the typical design and layout of a Silla-era temple. And to the rear of the lecture hall’s elevated foundation stones are the remains of other elevated auxiliary buildings’ foundation stones.

To the far north of the temple grounds is the a replica of the Stupa of State Preceptor Wongong from Geodonsa Temple Site. The replica was placed on the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site between 2006 to 2007. Like the original at the National Museum of Korea, this replica is beautifully designed. Located in a clearing in the trees to the rear of the temple site grounds is the replica. Unlike the original, this stupa has a foundation, which allows the three octagonal layers of the base to rest upon. Each face of the base is adorned with decorative flower patterns. The top and bottom parts of the lower body are carved with line patterns, as well as images of the Eight Guardian deities. On the upper portion of the body, you’ll find that the faces of both the front and back of the body are engraved with door and lock designs, while the faces to the right and left have window designs. Additionally, these engravings are joined by the Four Heavenly Kings. The octagonal roof stone has a gradual slope to it, and it appears to be attempting to replicate a wooden structure style. It’s assumed, because the neighbouring stele for Wongong-guksa was first erected in 1025, that the original stupa was also built in the same year.

And the final structure that people can enjoy at the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is the Stele for State Preceptor Wongong at Geodonsa Temple Site on the east side of the temple site grounds. Unlike the stupa, this is the original stele. The stele consists of three parts: a pedestal, a body, and a decorative capstone. The pedestal of the stele has a turtle body with a dragon’s head, while the pattern on the back of the tortoise has hexagonal patterns joined with manja and lotus flower designs. The body of the stele has a square style of Chinese handwriting. The inscription, as was previously mentioned, was written by Choe Chung. And the calligraphy detailing the life of Wongong-guksa was written by Kim Geo-ung. The decorative capstone, on the other hand, seems quite large in comparison to the tortoise-shaped pedestal. The capstone has an image of a dragon enveloped in flames. And according to a local legend, the capstone is so heavy that it couldn’t be lifted an inch by strong young men or even a cow.

How To Get There

From the Wonju Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #55-1 for 61 stops. You’ll then need to get off at the “An-mal – 안말” stop. From this stop, you’ll then need to take Bus #21 or Town Bus #20. After 20 stops, get off at the “Geodonsa-ji – 거돈사지” stop. Overall, with 81 combined stops, it’ll take an hour and twenty minutes. Or if you’d rather take a taxi from the Wonju Intercity Bus Terminal, it’ll take 50 minutes and cost 60,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 3.5/10

If you’re a temple site lover like I am, then the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is for you. More and more, especially as of late, I’ve been enjoying visiting temple sites throughout Korea. And the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site certainly continues that trend. It’s unfortunate that the historic stupa no longer remains on the temple site grounds, but it gives you a pretty good excuse (like you needed one) to visit the National Museum of Korea. As for the temple site itself, the obvious highlight is the Stele for State Preceptor Wongong at Geodonsa Temple Site with its beautiful design, especially the capstone. In addition to this historic stele, you can also enjoy the three-story pagoda, while attempting to imagine just how majestic the former temple must have once been.

The Three-Story Stone Pagoda at Geodonsa Temple Site. The Geumdang-ji Hall at the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site. The two metre tall stone altar in the centre of the Geumdang-ji Hall. A wider view at the extensive temple site grounds. The replica of the Stupa of State Preceptor Wongong from Geodonsa Temple Site to the rear of the temple site grounds. One of the reliefs on the replica stupa. And yet another. The historic Stupa of State Preceptor Wongong from Geodonsa Temple Site at the National Museum of Korea. With an up-close of the authentic Stupa of State Preceptor Wongong from Geodonsa Temple Site reliefs. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Temporary ROOM available at Gwanagan Beach

Wed, 2022-12-14 09:32
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Gwanganlli BeachContact person by email

A basic one room is available to rent for 2-7 days very close to the beach.

The room has basic amenities:

Bed, Wardrobe, AC, Gas Stove, Refrigerator, Washing Machine etc.

It is a regular room nothing fancy but located on the 1st FLOOR just 300 meters away from the beach.

There is one SS size bed (220*110cm) + an additional mattress.

If you need a space for FIRECRACKER festival, CHRISTMAS, or NEW YEAR right next to the beach you can contact us

PRICING:

125,000 per day

200,000 for 2 days

500,000 for 7 days

(includes everything)

Currently, we can offer short-term only.

KakaoTalk_20221214_175952419.jpg KakaoTalk_20221214_175953032.jpg KakaoTalk_20221214_175953549.jpg KakaoTalk_20221214_175954058.jpg KakaoTalk_20221214_175954568.jpg Capture.JPG

adamamit

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Yangsan licensed English teacher

Tue, 2022-12-13 04:19
Classified Ad Type: Location: Contact person by email

Looking for a part-time position ( Yangsan-si) starting in March daytime until 12:00 or 1:00 depending on location.

I have Fvisa and a teaching license.

I have taught in korea for 4 years. 

Name: Ashley

Citizen: American 

Visa: F6

Degree: elementary education 

Qualifications: teaching license,  korea for 4 years teaching. 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

How to “YEET” Something in Korean – Using “처” | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2022-12-12 17:02

I've seen beginners occasionally use verbs that begin with 처 in their sentences inappropriately, and wanted to clarify how these are used and exactly what they feel like. 처 can be added to the beginning of action verbs to make them stronger, almost like a swear (but not a swear). Today's latest "Korean FAQ" video explains the 처 suffix in detail and gives some examples that you can use as well.

The post How to “YEET” Something in Korean – Using “처” | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

How to “YEET” Something in Korean – Using “처” | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2022-12-12 14:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Templestay – Baegyangsa Temple (Jangseong, Jeollanam-do)

Sun, 2022-12-11 23:41
Baegyangsa Temple in Jangseong, Jeollanam-do. Introduction to Temple

Baegyangsa Temple is located in Naejangsan National Park in Jangseong, Jeollanam-do. It’s located in a picturesque valley between Mt. Daegaksan (529.8 m) to the southeast and Mt. Baegamsan (741.2 m) to the northwest. Baegyangsa Temple was first founded in 632 A.D. during the Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.). When the temple was first constructed, it was named Baegamsa Temple. Later, and during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), it was renamed to Jeongtosa Temple in 1034. The temple would change its name, once more, in 1350 to that of Gakjinguksa Temple. Finally in 1574, when the temple was rebuilt, it was also renamed with the current name of Baegyangsa Temple. In English, Baegyangsa Temple means “White Sheep Temple.” The name of the temple is in reference to a white sheep that would come down from the neighbouring mountains to listen to the sutra readings. After listening to these teachings, the sheep ascended up to Jeongto, or the “Pure Land” in English.

Throughout the years, Baegyangsa Temple has been renovated several times including in 1786, 1864, and 1917. And during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-1945), Baegyangsa Temple was named one of the district head temples. Currently, it’s the 18th District Head Temple of the Jogye-jong Order (the largest Buddhist order in Korea). In total, Baegyangsa Temple is home to two Korean Treasures, two Natural Monuments, and a Scenic Site.

As for the Templestay program at Baegyangsa Temple, the temple offers two distinct programs. The first is entitled the “Experience Temple Food and Culture with Monk Program.” This program focuses on cooking temple food. The other program that Baegyangsa Temple offers is the “Lighten your Mind Program;” however, this program currently doesn’t seem to be running.

For more on Baegyangsa Temple.

Directions

To get to Baegyangsa Temple, you can catch a bus from the Gwangju Intercity Bus Terminal. Buses to Baegyangsa Temple first leave at 6:35 a.m., and they run until 7:50 p.m. These buses leave at intervals anywhere from 60 to 80 minutes apart, and the bus ride will take one hour and twenty minutes.

Templestay Programs

The “Experience Temple Food and Culture with Monk Program” is a one night two day program that allows a visitor to explore and experience Buddhist culture through its food.

A: Experience Temple Food and Culture with Monk Program TimeTitle14:00-15:00Registration/Check-in (Temple Office)15:00-16:00Temple Tour (Mandatory)17:00-17:30Dinner Offering17:50-18:00Watching the Dharma Drum Ceremony (Mandatory)18:00-18:40Buddhist Evening Ceremony (Mandatory)18:50-21:00Free Time21:00-00:00Going to Bed TimeTitle04:20-05:00Buddhist Morning Ceremony (Optional)06:30-07:00Breakfast Offering07:00-09:00Free Time09:00-09:30Return Bedding10:00-14:30Going to Jung Kwan Nun’s Temple, Have a Cooking Class14:30-15:00Coming Back to the Temple Office & Write a Review14:30-15:00Departure

(This schedule is subject to change)

The Templestay facilities at Baegyangsa Temple. (Picture courtesy of the Templestay website). Temple Information

Address: Jangseong-gun Jeollanam-do26, Yaksu-ri, Bukha-myeon

Tel: 061-392-0434

E-mail: [email protected]

Fees

Experience Temple Food and Culture with Monk Program – adults – 150,000 won

*You should cancel your reservation at least 30 days before the scheduled reservation. The reason for this is that there is a long waiting list. Also, it’s possible that the temple cancels the reservation due to unexpected temple events.

**The cancellation policy is as follows: 3 days before: 100% refund; 2 days before: 50% refund; 1 day before: 10% refund; the day of the reservation there is no refund.

Links

Reservations for the Experience Temple Food and Culture with Monk Program

Beautiful Baeyangsa Temple. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Bollywood Firecracker Fest Special Meal

Sun, 2022-12-11 12:42
Date: Saturday, December 17, 2022 - 12:00Location: Event Type:  **Bollywood #firecracker special MEAL SET**

Where: Bollywood, Gwangan Beach

When: 17 Dec, 2022 (Saturday)

Time: 12 PM - 10  PM

What's Included:

Choose 1 curry (Vegan OR Chicken) +

Salad + Rice + Samosa + Lassi (all included)

Price; 15,000 KRW Only

 

 

#bollywoodbusan #veganfood #hookahlounge

http://facebook.com/bollywoodbusan

firecracker 2022-01.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Experienced F4 Instructor, looking for Part-Time at Competitive School, Busan/Yangsan/Gimhae

Sun, 2022-12-11 12:33
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

Hello, I am Steve, a 12+ years veteran ESL and Standardized Test Prep Instructor, and I am looking for part time work to begin in the middle of February.

If you are looking for a reliable and professional instructor to assist in ESL education, Test Preparation (SAT, ACT, TOEFL, IELTS, AP exam) please feel free to contact me and I will provide you with my resume.

I am an F4 Visa Instructor, with all of my documents prepared, and I am able to provide references from previous employers who can vouch for my quality of work. I am already living in Busan and have a car, so I can commute for the right job offer in the areas of Busan, Yangsan, Gimhae. I am also an experienced Online (ZOOM) instructor.

I am excited to offer my skills to a school seeking to find a teacher to fit their needs.

I am looking forward to your communication!

Best Regards!

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Santa available

Sat, 2022-12-10 08:56
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

Ho! Ho! Ho!

I'm a Santa, and I'm available Tue and Wed, mornings. 

010•5775•1956 message.  Thanks

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Two killed by bears

Sat, 2022-12-10 04:06
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Pages