Worldbridges Megafeed

Summer Plans?

Koreabridge - 10 hours 29 min ago
Choices International Travel Domestic Travel Quality Downtime/Staycation Summer Romance Studying / Learning Summer Job / Extra Income Catching up on To Do List Just normal life - nothing special Nothing. I hate summer! Details: 
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Gaemoksa Temple – 개목사 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-06-13 23:12
Gaemoksa Temple in Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Gaemoksa Temple is located near Bongjeongsa Temple in the southeastern foothills of Mt. Cheondeungsan (575.9 m) in northern Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple was first built during the early part of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). The famed monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) built the temple during the reign of King Sinmun of Silla (r. 681-692). According to this legend, Uisang-daesa decided to build this temple after gaining enlightenment inside the neighbouring Cheongdeung-gul Cave, which is located directly behind the temple. Originally, the temple was called Heungguksa Temple, which means “Making the Country Thrive Temple” in English. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), Jeong Mong-ju (1338-1392) studied at the temple.

During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the name of the temple changed from Heungguksa Temple to that of its current name of Gaemoksa Temple. Around this time, there were many blind people living in the Andong area, but after this temple was constructed many of these people regained their ability to see. That’s why the name of the temple changed from Heungguksa Temple to Gaemoksa Temple. In English, Gaemoksa Temple means “Opening the Eyes of People Temple.”

There is a Korean Treasure at Gaemoksa Temple. It’s the Wontong-jeon Hall, which is Korean Treasure #242.

Gaemoksa Temple during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45). (Picture courtesy of here). The Wontong-jeon Hall at Gaemoksa Temple also from Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45). (Picture courtesy of here). Temple Layout

You first approach Gaemoksa Temple up a long, winding mountain road. It appears as though it was recently paved, so the way up is quite easy. Eventually, you’ll arrive at the temple parking lot with a stunning view of the city of Andong off in the distance. And between the view and the city is the temple pond with surrounding purple flowers.

You’ll then pass through the Uhwa-ru Pavilion. This stunning, all-natural entry gate has old monks’ dorms on the backside of the pavilion. Straight ahead, on the other hand, is the Wontong-jeon Hall. It’s believed that this shrine hall was first constructed in 1457. The reason that this is believed is that there is a written record found inside the shrine hall from its reconstruction in 1969. This written record states “The First Year of Joseon Conforming with God.”

As for the structure of the shrine hall, it’s situated under a gable roof. There are brackets placed on poles to support the weight of the roof. The front and back of the building are shaped differently. The front of the building has a raised, wooden corridor. The exterior walls are adorned in simple dancheong colours. Additionally, the shrine hall has ondol (a traditional floor heating system in Korea), which is extremely rare in an early Joseon Dynasty shrine hall.

As for the main altar inside the Wontong-jeon Hall, you’ll find three different incarnations of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Of the three, it’s the central image that’s most distinct and probably the oldest. Its face is slender, and it’s wearing an ornate crown. To the left of the main altar, you’ll find a modern painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife); while to the right of the main altar, you’ll find an equally modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). If you look closely, you’ll find a rather rare sight. In this painting is an image of Yongwang (The Dragon King) wearing a military uniform similar to that of Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) in the same painting.

To the left of the Wontong-jeon Hall are the monks’ dorms and administrative offices at Gaemoksa Temple. And to the right of the main hall, you’ll find the Sanshin-gak Hall, which is currently under reconstruction. This shaman shrine hall, however, functions as a Sanshin/Chilseong-gak Hall. The image of a Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) painting inside the shaman shrine hall holds a golden fan, and the tiger looks especially fierce. To the right of the Sanshin painting is an older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

How To Get There

From the Andong Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #310 to get to Gaemoksa Temple. You’ll need to take this bus for 14 stops, or 16 minutes, and get off at the “Bongjeongsa Bus Station Bus Stop – 봉정사 정류장 하차.” From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk 1.4 km, or 21 minutes, to get to Gaemoksa Temple.

Another way that you can get to Gaemoksa Temple is after visiting Bongjeongsa Temple. After visiting Bongjeongsa Temple, there is a trail to the east of the temple grounds near Yeongsanam Hermitage. The hike from Bongjeongsa Temple to Gaemoksa Temple will take 11 minutes over 600 metres.

And if public transportation and a trip to Bongjeongsa Temple aren’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Andong Bus Terminal to get to Gaemoksa Temple. The taxi ride will take you around 20 minutes over 14 km, and it’ll cost you around 19,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 6/10

The views and close proximity of Gaemoksa Temple to Bongjeongsa Temple are definitely pluses. Additionally, the 15th century Wontong-jeon Hall is absolutely stunning architecturally with its exposed rafters and wooden corridor out in front of the actual shrine hall. Stepping inside the historic main hall, you’ll find a stunning central image of Gwanseeum-bosal. Additionally, you can also enjoy the mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the shaman shrine hall. It doesn’t hurt that the abbot at Gaemoksa Temple is quite friendly, too. While smaller in size, and if you’re already visiting Bongjeongsa Temple, Gaemoksa Temple is definitely worth a bit of your time, as well.

The view of Andong off in the distance from the heights of Gaemoksa Temple. A colourful moth at the temple. Some beautiful purple flowers at the temple. The Uhwa-ru Pavilion at the entry of the temple grounds. A look through the Uhwa-ru Pavilion towards the historic Wontong-jeon Hall. The Wontong-jeon Hall. The corridor just outside the main hall. The main altar inside the Wontong-jeon Hall. A closer look at the central image of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). A painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) inside the main hall. The modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Wontong-jeon Hall. A closer look at the image of Yongwang (The Dragon King) wearing a military uniform inside the Shinjung Taenghwa. The Sanshin-gak Hall that’s currently under construction. The image of Chilseong (The Seven Stars) inside the shaman shrine hall. Joined by this golden image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And adorning the interior walls of the Sanshin-gak Hall are these lotus flowers.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Gyeongheungsa Temple – 경흥사 (Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-06-12 23:15
The “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” in Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Gyeongheungsa Temple is located in southern Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the northeast of Donghaksan (602.7 m). It’s believed by some that Gyeongheungsa Temple was first founded in 659 A.D. by the monk Hyegong-hwasang. But the evidence is rather thin to support this theory. Another theory states that Gyeongheungsa Temple was first founded in 1637. And later, the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was enshrined at the temple in 1644. The temple would be rebuilt in 1719 and further rebuilt in 1897.

In the 1990s, the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was examined to reveal a written message on the clothing of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This written message revealed that there used to be four to five hermitages at Gyeongheungsa Temple before it was destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-98). Additionally, the temple was quite large and had dozens of monks that lived at the temple.

In 1990, the Daeung-jeon Hall was dismantled, repaired, and restored. Also, the monks’ dorms were repaired this time, as well. In 1993, a new Daeung-jeon Hall was built at Gyeongheungsa Temple. And the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was moved to the new Daeung-jeon Hall, while the old Daeung-jeon Hall was converted into the temple’s Myeongbu-jeon Hall.

The “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” is Korean Treasure #1750, while the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple in Gyeongsan” is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Material #555.

Temple Layout

As you first approach the temple grounds, and as you enter the temple parking lot, you’ll notice the temple budowon (stupa field) to the right of the temple shrine halls. Slightly elevated, there are a row of six stupas varying in both shape and size to greet you as you first approach Gyeongheungsa Temple.

A little further to the left and past the monks’ dorms, there is a cluster of some four temple shrine halls. The first of these shrine halls is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with murals dedicated to Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) and the Bodhidharma. Housed inside this shrine hall is a triad centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) and Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Underneath this triad is only a small part of the main altar, which is known as a “sumidan” in Korean. Officially, this altar is known as the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple in Gyeongsan,” and it’s Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Material #555. Considering the normal size of a “sumidan,” it would appear as though only one-fifth of the original altar still remains. Some of the subjects on the altar that still remain are crabs, fish, frogs, lotus flowers, and peonies. Based on what remains of the “sumidan,” it’s presumed that the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple” was built in the early 17th century. And to the right of this historic main altar is a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

Between the monks’ dorms and the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, and up a set of stairs, is the Daeung-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this hall are adorned with Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” on the main altar. This triad consists of a central image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) being joined on either side by Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). This Korean Treasure dates back to 1644, as indicated by a prayer discovered inside the statue of Seokgamoni-bul. There’s also an inscription on the pedestal that Seokgamoni-bul rests upon, as well. Additionally, records including the background, organizer, and maker of the statues were stored inside the body of the Historical Buddha. These records also relate the material used and the monk-sculptor, Cheongheo, who made these 17th century wooden statues. He was based out of Geumsansa Temple in Jeollabuk-do and was invited to many temples, including Gyeongheungsa Temple, to create these beautiful Buddhist statues. All three of the statues are both strong and serene in nature. And both Bodhisattvas wear regal crowns. The triad is a great example of Buddhist artistry during the mid-17th century. Also housed inside the main hall is a mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal, as well as a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the rear of these two shrine halls, and slightly up an embankment, are two smaller sized shaman shrine halls. Turning to the left and then to the right, you’ll make your way up towards these shaman shrine halls along a forested pathway. The first of the two is the Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall. Housed inside this shaman shrine hall are a pair of original murals dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). A little further to the right is the temple’s Sanshin-gak Hall. This shaman shrine hall houses a blue background fronted by an image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) joined with a tiger with a nearly human face.

How To Get There

To get to Gyeongheungsa Temple from the Gyeongsan Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to walk for about five minutes, or 300 metres, to get to the Gyeongsan Shijang (market) bus stop. From this bus stop, you’ll need to take Bus #100. After 14 stops, or 21 minutes, you’ll need to get off at the “Daemyeong 2-ri (Cheong-do Banghyang) – 대명 2리 (청방향)” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk 2.2 km to get to the temple.

And if public transportation isn’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Gyeongsan Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride will take you about 15 minutes, over 8 km, and it’ll cost you 12,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 6.5/10

The two major highlights at Gyeongheungsa Temple are the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple in Gyeongsan” and the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple.” Even though only twenty percent of the main altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall is still intact, it’s a stunning one-fifth. Also, the main altar triad inside the newly built Daeung-jeon Hall are stunning, as well, both in scope and style. In addition to these rather obvious highlights, you can also enjoy the three shaman murals inside the two shaman shrine halls, as well as the collection of stupas inside the budowon at the entry of the temple grounds.

One of the stupa in the budowon at the entry of the temple grounds. The Myeongbu-jeon Hall. A rather surprised image of Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). The triad inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall that rests upon the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple.” The Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The pathway leading up to the new Daeung-jeon Hall. One of the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals) that adorns the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. The “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The modern painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) inside the main hall. The central image of Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) from the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) from inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The trail leading up to the two shaman shrine halls at Gyeongheungsa Temple. The Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall (foreground) and Sanshin-gak Hall (background). The blue image of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And the image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit).—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Important Hanja: THE POWER 력 (力) (한자) | Korean FAQ

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-06-11 03:30

It's time for a new Hanja lesson, and this time we're going to learn about the Hanja 力. This Hanja is read as either 력 or 역, and means "power," an "ability," or "strength." Watch my new video below to learn all about how it's used.

The post Important Hanja: THE POWER 력 (力) (한자) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Korean - English free language exchange by zoom

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-10 06:12
Classified Ad Type: 

Hello

I am learning Korean and would like to find a Korean to do a language exchange by  zoom once a week for  about an hour. Probably in the morning some time. 

My Korean is at the beginner's level. I would like to make and understand short and simple, ordinary Korean sentences. I have a book but I am more interested in trying to speak without a book if that is possible.

In return I can offer 30 mins free talking in English.

I live in Busan (Dongnae) but can do a zoom class if more convenient.

Regards

Joseph. 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Korean Past Tense – How to Express Earlier Actions

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-10 04:53
If you want to indicate something in the Korean past tense, you will be using the verb endings -었/았/ㅆ어요 (-eot/at/sseoyo). These work … Korean Past Tense – How to Express Earlier Actions The post Korean Past Tense – How to Express… CONTINUE READING

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 

Please share, help Korean spread! 

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Native Speaker Offering Online English Classes (For Charge Not Exchange)

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-10 01:49
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: http://www.facebook.com/AskEnglishTuitionAndTraining?mibextid=ZbWKwL

I am an American with 22 years teaching experience including IGCSE First and Second Language, Checkpoint English, IGCSE Literature, A Levels English and Literature, and IELTS. Have also recently completed a certification course in IGCSE Geography. I can also create courses based on need and work on building English fluency in all areas (speaking, writing etc.). I teach online and my connection is fast and secure. www.facebook.com/AskEnglishTuitionAndTraining?mibextid=ZbWKwL

flyer 2024 1.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Bogwangsa Temple – 보광사 (Cheongsong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-09 23:42
Inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall at Bogwangsa Temple in Cheongsong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

There are numerous Bogwangsa Temples in Korea, but this Bogwangsa Temple is located in Cheongsong, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the north of Mt. Bogwangsan (435.1 m). While there’s no clear evidence as to when Bogwangsa Temple was first founded, it’s believed to have been first established in 668 A.D. by the famed monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.). However, this date seems to be unreliable, as Uisang-daesa was still studying in Tang Dynasty China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) until 671 A.D. According to the “Yeojidoseo,” or “Collected Chronicles and Maps, 1765” in English, “Bogwangsa Temple is located five li (two kilometres) south of the local administrative office. The temple is a guardian temple for the tomb of Shim Hong-bu.” From this quote, we can discern that the temple was a prayer hall for the Cheongsong Shim clan.

During the reign of King Sejong (r. 1418-1450), Queen Soheon (1395-1446), who was a Shim of Cheongsong, had King Sejong designate the temple to protect the tomb of the progenitor of the Shim clan. As a result, a garden, a memorial, and the Manse-ru Pavilion were all built in and around Bogwangsa Temple. Thus, it’s believed that the Manse-ru Pavilion was first built in 1428 and later rebuilt by the Shim clan in 1856. And it was rebuilt, once more, in 1958 by Shim Sang-gak, who was the 22nd generation grandson of Shim Hong-bu.

In 1979, the governor of the region had the historic Geukrak-jeon Hall repaired. It was around this time that an inscription on the main beam of the Geukrak-jeon Hall’s structure that showed that the shrine hall was built in 1615. And in 1995, the Samseong-gak Hall was built. More recently, the entire temple grounds have undergone an extensive reconstruction including the Geukrak-jeon Hall.

There are two provincial treasures at Bogwangsa Temple. They are the Manse-ru Pavilion, which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Material #72; and the “Geukrak-jeon Stone Amita-bul Triad of Bogwangsa Temple in Cheongsong,” which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Material #541. Additionally, the Geukrak-jeon Hall is Korean Treasure #1840.

Temple Layout

You first approach Bogwangsa Temple up a long country road. The first signs that you’re nearing the temple grounds are the modern turtle-based stele out in front of the temple grounds. A little further along, and past the temple parking lot, is the aforementioned Manse-ru Pavilion that separates the outer from the inner portion of the main temple courtyard. The Manse-ru Pavilion is a two-story structure. The first story simply supports the second story of the structure. As for the second story, it’s used for larger meetings.

Passing to the right of the Manse-ru Pavillion, and having stepped into the main temple courtyard, you’ll first notice the diminutive Geukrak-jeon Hall in front of you. Out in front of the main hall is an equally smaller sized three-story pagoda. Before heading up the stairs that lead up to the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll notice a pair of modern stone lanterns on either side of the stone stairs.

The exterior walls of the Geukrak-jeon Hall are adorned in simple dancheong colours. Stepping inside the main hall, you’ll be welcomed by a main altar occupied by the “Geukrak-jeon Stone Amita-bul Triad of Bogwangsa Temple in Cheongsong.” In the centre of this triad sits an image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise), who is joined on either side by statues of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul). According to the original text discovered on the clothing of the statues, it was determined that the triad was constructed in 1735 by the monk-sculptor Yeo Cheol. The central image of Amita-bul is slender and strong in appearance, while the two accompanying Bodhisattvas wear crowns on their heads as long hair flows down towards their shoulders. This triad is then backed by a new main altar mural. And on the far left wall is a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the left of the Geukrak-jeon Hall is the temple’s Samseong-gak Hall. Slightly elevated, and all but unadorned, you’ll be welcomed inside the shaman shrine hall by a triad of paintings of Korea’s most popular shaman deities. The first of the three, and hanging on the far left wall, is an elaborate mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). This mural is then joined on the main altar by an older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).

The other building on the temple grounds, and to the right of the main hall, is the nuns’ dorms and temple’s kitchen.

How To Get There

The easiest and fastest way to get to Bogwangsa Temple is to take a taxi from the Cheongsong Intercity Bus Terminal. By taxi, it should take about 5 minutes, or 2.6 km, and it’ll cost you around 5,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 6/10

Bogwangsa Temple’s royal past, and its connection to King Sejong, makes the temple far more interesting. Additionally, the Manse-ru Pavilion and historic Geukrak-jeon Hall are stunning examples of Buddhist architecture. Also, the main altar triad inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall is rather unique in design. You can also enjoy the elaborate Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) mural housed inside the Samseong-gak Hall. While smaller in size, and with only a couple of shrine halls for visitors to explore, Bogwangsa Temple is still worth a visit, especially if you’re in the area.

Arriving at Bogwangsa Temple. The Manse-ru Pavilion at the temple. A look inside the second-story of the Manse-ru Pavilion. The nuns’ dorms, temple dog, and three-story pagoda all in one shot. The Geukrak-jeon Hall. One of only two paintings that adorns the exterior of the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall of the “Geukrak-jeon Stone Amita-bul Triad of Bogwangsa Temple in Cheongsong.” The Samseong-gak Hall at Bogwangsa Temple. And the modern painting of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong – 구미 황상동 마애여래입상 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-06-06 23:10
The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” in Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The History and Design of the Image

The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” is located in northeastern Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do hidden behind a row of factory buildings. These factories shield people from being able to see this high relief image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) from the road.

It’s presumed that this high relief carving of a standing Amita-bul was first made around the turn of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) and Goryeo (918-1392) periods in the 10th century. The relief is carved on the southeastern surface of a huge rock cliff. The image measures an impressive 7.3 metres in height. In addition to both its age and height, the high relief image is Korean Treasure #1122.

According to a legend, a general was being chased by the enemy, but his life was saved by a woman who helped him hide behind a large rock. Later, the general considered this woman to be a Buddha, so he had an image of Amita-bul carved onto this rock. This would become the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong.”

As for the design of the high relief image, Amita-bul has a large protruding bump on its head. This is meant to symbolize his wisdom. The three creases around his neck represent the “three destinies” of affliction, actions, and suffering. His eyes are gently closed. It also has a thin nose and small lips. Both of its ears are elongated. The robe of Amita-bul hangs lightly over the arms. The hands are raised to its chest, and the statue has the left hand with the palm turned inward and the right hand has its palm turned outward. A flat stone was placed atop the rock cliff to serve as a protective canopy for the statue.

How To Get There

The simplest way to get to the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” from the Gumi Intercity Bus Terminal is to take a taxi. The ride should take about 15 minutes, over 13 km, and it’ll cost you 13,000 won (one way).

Otherwise, you can take Bus #900 from the Gumi Intercity Bus Terminal. You’ll need to take this bus for 10 minutes and get off at the “금오공대입구 – Geumo Gonddae-ipgu” bus stop. From this bus stop, you can catch either Bus #90 or Bus #93. You’ll need to take this bus for 11 stops, or 12 minutes, and get off at the “델코전지 하차 – Delko Jeonji” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to head north for about 800 minutes, or 13 minutes, and look for the “미애사 – Miaesa Temple” sign. The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” is to the left rear of a large factory building.

Overall Rating: 4/10

There’s a modern temple next to the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” named Miaesa Temple. But rather obviously, the main highlight in the area is the high relief image of Amita-bul. The large 7.3 metre tall image is impressive in both its size and elegant design. When visiting this image of Amita-bul, take your time to take it all in. This image is a masterful representation of Unified Silla/Goryeo design.

The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” as you first approach it from the road. Mounting the stairs towards the high relief image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Nearing the altar and the 7.3 tall image. The image from the left. A close-up from the front. A look at the image’s two hands. The image from the right. And an up-close of Amita-bul from the right.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #10: Korea – 한국

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-06-06 22:26

We're halfway finished with my free natural Korean conversation course! In this lesson, Keykat makes another appearance, and two friends talk about Korea.

The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #10: Korea – 한국 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Dictation #006

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-06-04 01:36

Instagram     YouTube

Hi 안녕하세요 I'm Won!
I hope this channel is helpful

Private Korean lesson (Conversation, Pronunciation, Writing etc)
You can check more detail on my Instagram page

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Easy Korean Vocabulary | Lesson 7. Nature in Korean 자연

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-03 05:48

Instagram     YouTube

Hi 안녕하세요 I'm Won!
I hope this channel is helpful

Private Korean lesson (Conversation, Pronunciation, Writing etc)
You can check more detail on my Instagram page

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Yeonmisa Temple – 연미사 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-02 23:42
The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong” at Yeonmisa Temple in Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Yeonmisa Temple, which means “Swallow Tail Temple” in English, is located in northern Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s believed that the temple was first founded in 634 A.D. by the monk Myeongdeok and then rebuilt twice. After its founding, very little is known about the temple’s history. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), the area that Yeonmisa Temple is located was a popular place for officials traveling in the area between provinces. This area is now known as Jebiwon.

During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the temple fell into disrepair. It was only later, and during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45), that Yeonmisa Temple was rebuilt in 1918. The temple was rebuilt on the former site of Yeonmisa Temple. And it was further restored in both 1943 and 1947. In 1978, the Daeung-jeon Hall was extended and the temple paintings were added in 1986. Now the temple is run by nuns.

Yeonmisa Temple is also home to the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong,” which is Korean Treasure #115. According to a legend, the Buddha carving was commissioned by a famous mason. However, his student was more skilled. So one day, while the student was working on the relief, the teacher removed the ladder. Then the master turned into a swallow and flew away up into the sky. This is one source of the temple’s name. Another legend has it that the Yosache (monks’ dorms) was located to the rear of the relief, which made it look like a swallow’s tail.

The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong” in 1933. (Courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Just the damaged head of the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong” in 1933. (Courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple Layout

As you approach the temple grounds, you’ll notice that there are a collection of buildings at Yeonmisa Temple. In the centre of these buildings is the Daeung-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to the Daeung-jeon Hall are adorned with the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals). Additionally, the front floral latticework is stunning. Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, and resting on the main altar, are a triad of statues centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This central image is joined on either side by statues of Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). To the right of this triad is an orangish painting dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And to the left of the main altar are two additional murals. One of these paintings is dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars), while the other is a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall are a collection of buildings that include the nuns’ dorms, administrative offices, and the temple parking lot. But it’s to the left of the main hall, and down a short path, that you’ll find the main highlight at the temple: the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong.” Along the way, there are several smaller statues of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, as well as a coin collecting statue of a jovial Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag).

Finally arriving at the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong,” which is also known as the “Jebiwon-seokbul,” you’ll find yourself looking up at the 12.38 metre tall image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). The image was created in two parts. This was a common method done during the Goryeo Dynasty. The head of Amita-bul was first sculpted and then attached to the image carved on the rock wall. The back of the head of the statue was completely destroyed; however, the front of the head was left intact. The protruding part on top of the Buddha’s head, which symbolizes supreme wisdom, is relatively high. It has long eyes and thick lips that are serenely smiling. Despite its large size and large body, the statue is well-balanced.

The image of Amita-bul stands on a lotus pedestal. There are folds in the robe, and it covers both of the shoulders to the statue of Amita-bul. The index fingers and middle fingers of each hand are placed together. The left hand is placed on its chests, while the right hand is situated on the stomach. There is still a little bit of orange paint left on the head, which indicates that the statue used to be painted (at least in part). It’s believed that the image was carved sometime in the 11th century. This style of large Buddha statues was a dominant style of folk Buddha statues created during the Goryeo Dynasty.

You can get a better idea of the full size of the statue, if you stand in the nearby park at some distance. It’s also at the base of the rock that somewhat obscures the full image of the statue that you can read an inscription that reads “이미타불” (Amita-bul).

How To Get There

To get to Yeonmisa Temple from the Andong Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #56. After 13 stops, or 22 minutes, you’ll need to get off at the “이천동 석불상하차 – Icheon-dong Seokbulsang” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk about 200 metres, or 5 minutes, to get to the temple grounds.

You can take a bus, or you can simply take a taxi from the Andong Intercity Bus Terminal to get to Yeonmisa Temple. The ride should take about 12 minutes and cost about 9,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 6/10

By far, the main highlight at Yeonmisa Temple is the impressive “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong.” Standing over 12 metres in height, comprised of two pieces, and dating back to the Goryeo Dynasty, it’s no wonder that this image of Amita-bul is the central highlight to any visit to Yeonmisa Temple. Other things to keep a look out for is the artwork around the Daeung-jeon Hall, as well as the image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the main hall and the floral latticework outside the main hall.

The signboard for the Daeung-jeon Hall at Yeonmisa Temple. Some of the floral latticework that adorns the main hall. And one of the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals) that adorns the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The mural of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the main hall. The pathway leading towards the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong.” Rounding the corner to see the 12 metre tall “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong.” From a distance. And a bit closer look at the “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Icheon-dong.”—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

I'm LIVE from KOREA!

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-02 15:04

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Coconut Husk Monkey

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-02 11:24
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: 

Fully handmade

100% Natural

Eco friendly

Product Dimension - 17cm (without tail) x 15cm x 22cm (LxWxH) 

Weight - 350g

Free delivery

monk1.jpg monk2.jpg monk3.jpg monk4.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Korean classes in June!

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-06-01 10:25
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: pnu haeundae seomyon ksu bsu jangsan

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

IMG_4553.JPG

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Pages

Subscribe to Worldbridges.net aggregator - Worldbridges Megafeed