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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:13
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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:12
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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:12
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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:03
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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:01
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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:01
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BGN Eye Hospital Spring Event 2021

Mon, 2021-03-08 03:01
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Samsung 3D Smart TV - HD LED 46 inch (Make an Offer) Leaving Sale

Sun, 2021-03-07 11:41
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: PNUContact person by email

Hi, I am planning to leave soon

Here I present to you my most loved item of home, my Samsung Smart TV. It connects to wifi and you can netflix and chill, play games download apps and what not? 

It has a 3D mode, you can download movies from torrent and watch it in 3D on the TV via the special glasses which connects automatically to the TV when turned on.

The TV is in immaculate condition

You will receive following items with the TV. 

1. TV Remote

2. Four 3D Glasses

3. HDMI Cable and Optical Cable

4. Connection Cord

5. Cleaning accessories received with the TV

Please refer to the pics for more details, its super light to carry

Provides true cinematic experience I will throw in free 2.1 channel Sound box for Dolby surround sound

Hit me up if you are interested 010 2648 9402

Looking to get 450,000 kW whats your offer? 

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Billy Go’s Beginner Korean Course | #94: Two Things at Once Part 1

Sat, 2021-03-06 19:18

This will be a two part episode. This part we'll learn about the most basic way to say "WHILE" in Korean.

This course will have 100 episodes, and we're already at episode 94! There are only a few more episodes left in this series.

Remember that this course goes in order from the beginning, so I recommend moving through it in order so you don't miss anything important.

The post Billy Go’s Beginner Korean Course | #94: Two Things at Once Part 1 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Winter's Night (2020)

Sat, 2021-03-06 16:20
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Mitaam Hermitage – 미타암 (Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Thu, 2021-03-04 23:30
The 8th Century Statue of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) at Mitaam Hermitage in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do.

This posts contains affiliate links. I receive a percentage of sales, if you purchase the item after clicking on an advertising link at no expense to you. This will help keep the website running. Thanks, as always, for your support!

Hermitage History and Myths

Mitaam Hermitage is located on the eastern slopes of Mt. Cheonseongsan (922 m) in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. The hermitage is named after Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Mitaam Hermitage was first established by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). In addition to Mitaam Hermitage, Wonhyo-daesa built eighty-nine other temples and hermitages on Mt. Cheonseongsan (One Thousand Saints Mountain) which includes Hongryongsa Temple.

The hermitage was later expanded in 921 A.D. by the monk Jijong. It was expanded again in 1238 A.D. by the monk Jungjin. Mitaam Hermitage, and more specifically, the 8th century stone standing statue of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) and its grotto are immortalized in the pages of the 13th century text Samguk Yusa (Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms). It’s stated in the Samguk Yusa that five monks at Mitaam Hermitage were disciplining their minds in meditation, when they ascended to the Western Paradise.

More recently, Mitaam Hermitage underwent a renovation in 1888. It should also be noted that Mitaam Hermitage falls under the administrative control of the neighbouring Tongdosa Temple, which is the 15th Headquarters of the Jogye-jong Order.

Mitaam Hermitage is also referred to as the “Third Seokguram” for the naturally occurring grotto that’s located on the hermitage grounds. The Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha at Mitaam Hermitage that’s located inside the grotto is Korean Treasure #998.

Here’s a little more about Wonhyo-daesa and his connection to Mt. Cheonseongsan. The text below can be found throughout the Naewonsa Temple valley, and it’s been translated by Andrew Douch on his website. If you haven’t been to his website Korean Trails, I highly recommend it, especially if you enjoy hiking in Korea.

In 673 Wonhyo began meditating in Seon Buddhism and eventually ended up going to mainland China. There was a time during his visit when 1000 people from the temple Taehwa-sa in Tang China were in danger of being buried under a mountain of mud after torrential rains. Upon realising this, Wonhyo threw out a wooden board, the people saw this strange board hanging in the air and thinking it mysterious, ran into the prayer hall, immediately upon which the mountain collapsed behind them. On the board thrown by Wonhyo had been the words, “Throwing the board, Wonhyo saves the people.”

Because of this the 1000 sought out Wonhyo and became his disciples. Wonhyo began searching for a place for all these people to stay and upon reaching the spot where this Sanshin-gak now stands, disappeared. Wonhyo built 89 small temples in the area around Naewon-sa in which his 1000 disciples were to stay. Furthermore a large drum was placed in the area in front of Cheonseong-san which would announce the beginning of sermon to the disciples on the mountain, where he would lecture the Avatamaka Sutra. The place where he taught the sutra was called the field of Avatamaka (hwa-eom-beol) while the place where the drum was sounded was called Jipbukpong (grasp and strike drum).

Furthermore because these disciples who climbed the mountain would get entangled in arrowroot vines and trip, Wonhyo called on the mountain spirits to clear the mountain of these vines. It is said to this day Cheonseong-san has no arrowroot vines. Later it is said that the 1000 disciples who studied under Wonhyo became sages, this is why the mountain has the name.

As Andrew notes in his post, there are a few issues with the Naewonsa Temple valley text. First, Wonhyo-daesa never traveled to Tang China (618-907 A.D.); instead, he returned to Silla after attaining enlightenment while attempting to travel to further his Buddhist education in Tang China. Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.), his friend and travel companion, did in fact continue on to Tang China. As a result, it’s highly unlikely that Wonhyo-daesa would then have one thousand disciples from Tang China following him around the mountains of Yangsan. And another point that needs to be made is that Seon Buddhism wasn’t firmly established on the Korean peninsula until the late-8th and early 9th century with the founding of the Gusan Seonmun, or “Nine Mountain Meditation Gates” in English. However, it should be noted that Seon Buddhism did enter the Korean peninsula through Master Beomnang (632-642 A.D.). Beomnang was a student of Daoxin (580-651 A.D.), who is considered the Fourth Chan Patriarch. However, Beomnang’s efforts largely failed probably due to a lack of royal support. But while it took two additional centuries to take root in Korea, it would seem as though Seon Buddhism did in fact have some influence on Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.), according to scholar David Mason.

Either way, whether all or just part of the myth is true about Wonhyo-daesa and Mt. Cheonseongsan, it would appear that the famous monk did in fact play some part in the transmission of Buddhism from his home in Yangsan.

Again, if you haven’t already checked out Andrew Douch’s or David Mason’s sites, you really should!

Hermitage Layout

You’ll first make your way up to Mitaam Hermitage up a long, wandering, and very steep road, until you eventually come to a trailhead that leads you up to the hermitage grounds. The views from the trail, which is about five hundred metres in length, are gorgeous with the mountain peaks above and the neighbouring valley below. Finally, when you do arrive at the rocky ledge where Mitaam Hermitage is located, you’ll first be greeted by a gift shop to your immediate right and a coffee stand to your left. Passing by both of these commercial establishments, and the row of compact monks dorms and the visitors centre, you’ll see the stunning Daeungbo-jeon Hall.

The exterior walls to the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, rather uniquely, are adorned with simple paintings dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). The latticework on the front door’s are beautifully adorned with wooden floral patterns. And at the base of these front doors are the descriptively designed Gwimyeon (Monster Masks).

Stepping inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, you’ll first notice the large red canopies hanging over the top of the well-populated main altar. In total, there are seven statues that take up residence along the main altar. The central three images are Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) in the middle. This statue is then flanked on either side by Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). To the left of this central triad are two Bodhisattvas. The first is Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul), who is joined to the left by a black haired image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). To the right of the central triad is an ornate statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). This statue is then joined to the right by an older, simpler statue of Seokgamoni-bul. All of these statues are joined by flying Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities) and dragons up near the beautiful red canopies.

The most intriguing aspect of the artwork housed inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall is the large mural that hangs in the far right corner near the second Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) statue. In this mural, you can see Wonhyo-daesa standing in the middle of a elevated rocky perch. He’s surrounded by what looks to be one thousand of his followers for which Mt. Cheonseongsan gets its name. Joining the one thousand followers are Buddhist monks, aristocracy, and potentially Queen Seondeok of Silla (r. 632-647) making an offering to Wonhyo-daesa in the bottom left corner, and potentially Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) to the right of Wonhyo-daesa. Dokseong appears to be holding a stick with a sutra attached by a rope. He has long, white eyebrows and a leafy garment covering his body. (Thanks to David Mason for his input, as always).

Further up the trail to the right, and past the hermitage’s kitchen, you’ll come to the hermitage’s compact Jong-ru (Bell Pavilion). Along this path, you’ll be headed towards an indoor pavilion that houses both the entrance to the Samseong-gak Hall, as well as the entrance to the Gulbeop-dang Hall, which houses the Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha at Mitaam Hermitage (T #998). Housed inside the Samseong-gak Hall to the right are three newer murals dedicated to three of the most popular shaman deities that you’ll find at a Korean Buddhist temple: Chilseong (The Seven Stars), Dokseong (The Lonely Saint), and Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit).

To the left, in a three metre wide opening to the cave, stands the 8th century statue dedicated to Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). There are new granite arches that have been installed at the naturally occurring cave entry. And the historic statue rests on top of a granite stand that has cloud designs etched onto it. The image of Amita-bul appears with a large ushnisha on top of its head. It also has long ears that fall to the top of Amita-bul’s shoulders. The left hand is attached to its body, while the right hand is placed near the centre of the statue’s chest, and it has a straight upright posture. The statue at Mitaam Hermitage follows a similar style of the more famous Stone Standing Amitabha Buddha of Gamsansa Temple, which is National Treasure #82. The Gamsansa Temple dates back to 719 A.D.

How To Get There

There are two ways that you can get to Mitaam Hermitage. The first is that you can catch Bus #2000 from the Yangsan Intercity Bus Terminal. The bus ride will take about forty minutes, and you’ll have to get off at the Jujin Village in Soju-dong. The second way you can get to Mitaam Hermitage is from the Busan City Bus Terminal in Nopo-dong. You can catch either Bus #247 or Bus #301 and get off at Jangheung. From this stop, you’ll need to follow the hermitage signs the rest of the way to lead you up to Mitaam Hermitage. Either way, make sure you pack your hiking boots because where the bus drops you off, you still have the rest of Mt. Cheonseongsan to hike to get to Mitaam Hermitage.

Overall Rating: 8/10

While definitely out of the way and quite the climb, Mitaam Hermitage more than makes up for it with its 8th century statue of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Adding to this is the masterpiece painting dedicated to Wonhyo-daesa inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, as well as the amazing views and the floral latticework adorning the main hall.

The view south from Mitaam Hermitage. The view north from Mitaam Hermitage. The colourful Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The beautiful latticework adorning the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. A look inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The masterful mural dedicated to Wonhyo-daesa. The Jong-ru (Bell Pavilion) at Mitaam Hermitage. The trail that leads up to the grotto that houses the 8th century statue of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). The 8th century statue dedicated to Amita-bul, which is Korean Treasure #998.
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Billy Go’s Beginner Korean Course | #93: I’m Going To

Thu, 2021-03-04 16:45

In this lesson we'll learn about a form useful for expressing your "intentions." For example, you can use this form to say that you're "going to do" something. It can also be used to say that you'll "try to do" something.

Remember that all of the episodes in this series are in order, so start from the beginning if you're new. Everything builds on the previous lessons, so if you follow from the start you'll be able to learn all the way to the end.

The post Billy Go’s Beginner Korean Course | #93: I’m Going To appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Looking for full time in Busan in April

Thu, 2021-03-04 04:12
Classified Ad Type: Neighborhood: BusanContact person by email

Hello. I am available for a full-time position in Busan starting in April or ASAP. I have twelve years experience teaching in Korea. My main focus is elementary-aged, but I have taught all ages and levels of students. If you need a hard working, dedicated teacher, I attached my resume. I look forward to hearing from you.

Please no spamming from recruiters.

 

resumeesl1pic2.doc resumeesl1pic2.doc
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Female student looking for part time job

Wed, 2021-03-03 10:00
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

I'm looking for a flexible part time job here in Busan. I am fluent in English and my Korean language skills is at the beginner's level. 

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Singwangsa Temple – 신광사 (Geoje-do, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Wed, 2021-03-03 00:18
The Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) Outdoor Island Shrine at Singwangsa Temple in Geoje, Gyeongsangnam-do.

This posts contains affiliate links. I receive a percentage of sales, if you purchase the item after clicking on an advertising link at no expense to you. This will help keep the website running. Thanks, as always, for your support!

Temple History

Singwangsa Temple is located on the southern coast, on the western side, of Geoje, Gyeongsangnam-do. Specifically, Singwangsa Temple is situated on the western portion of Mt. Baekamsan (494.6 m). According to the temple website, the location of Singwangsa Temple has long been regarded as a sacred place for the worship of Buddhism.

Singwangsa Temple dates back to the 1930’s, when a farmer, while digging a pond, discovered the Oryang Stone Buddha Statue. This stone Buddha statue dates back to either Later Silla (668-935 A.D.) or the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). This statue was designated Gyeongsangnam-do Tangible Cultural Heritage #48 in 1972.

More recently, Singwangsa Temple underwent extensive building during the 1980’s and 1990’s. During the 1980’s, the Iljumun Gate, the Nokyawon Shrine, the Sanshin-gak Hall, the subterranean Cheonbul-jeon Hall, and the Myeongbu-jeon Hall were built. During the 1990’s, the temple further expanded with the addition of the Beomjong-gak (Belll Pavilion) and the Nahan-jeon Hall. And in 2012, the Daeung-jeon Hall was built at Singwangsa Temple.

Temple Layout

You first approach Singwangsa Temple up a set of side-winding back roads, until you eventually see the temple’s Iljumun Gate and a collection of stupas. In a bend in the road, you’ll finally arrive at the temple parking lot. Just over a grassy knoll, and past a collection of beautiful cedar trees, you’ll see the large Daeung-jeon Hall straight ahead of you.

The exterior walls to the Daeung-jeon Hall are decorated with fading Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). In addition to this artwork, there is some beautiful latticework of dragons swirling around in their wooden frames with Gwimyeon (Monster Masks) at the base of the front doors. There are three large, dark wooden statues that take up residence inside the Daeung-jeon Hall on the main altar. The triad is centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This statue is then flanked on either side by Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) and Yaksayeorae-bul (The Buddha of the Eastern Paradise). This triad was first made in the late 1980’s, and they are meant to represent the idea of Samsara. These three central statues are then joined by four standing statues on the main altar. Starting from the left, they are Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife), Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power), Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom), and Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). This collection stands between 135 to 150 centimetres in height. The interior of the massive Daeung-jeon Hall is cavernous.

Just out in front of the Daeung-jeon Hall, and to the right, is the Beomjong-gak (Bell Pavilion). Surrounding the pavilion, and on strings, are folded letters left behind by people with their hopes and dreams written on them. As for the Beomjong-gak Pavilion, there’s a large Brahma Bell that takes up residence inside it. This bell dates back to 1990.

One of the highlights to Singwangsa Temple, and to the right of the Beomjong-gak Pavilion, is a shrine dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal. Past a mature collection of trees, and through an opening, you’ll come to a two-story island with a statue of Gwanseeum-bosal standing on the second story. This six metre tall statue of the Bodhisattva of Compassion stands with a bottle of ambrosia in her left hand. This bottle is turned downwards. And populating the pond that Gwanseeum-bosal stands commandingly over top of are a collection of beautiful Koi. The statue and shrine of Gwanseeum-bosal date back to 1994.

Just to the immediate right of the Daeung-jeon Hall, and up a set of stairs, you’ll arrive in the upper courtyard at Singwangsa Temple. You’ll see a glass shrine dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King) in this area. It’s just past this shrine, and up a hedgerow, you’ll come to the subterranean shrine hall at the temple. This is the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. Inside this temple shrine hall are eight bronze coloured plaques that depict various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas at the entry. Passing by these, you’ll next enter the large inner cave chamber. Seated in the centre of the chamber is the historic Oryang Stone Buddha Statue. This statue is joined on all sides by a thousand golden Buddha statues dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha).

Up past the Cheonbul-jeon Hall, and another set of stairs, you’ll come to a shaman shrine hall dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) and Chilseong (The Seven Stars). Besides being large in size, they are rather plain in design.

Just behind the Cheonbul-jeon Hall, and to the left of the Sanshin/Chilseong-gak Hall, you’ll come to another clearing. This time in the centre of this clearing is a beautiful stone sculpture dedicated to Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha). This statue stands four metres in height; and like the Gwanseeum-bosal statue at Sinwangsa Temple, this statue also dates back to 1994. Joining the seated image of Mireuk-bul in this part of the temple grounds is the Nahan-jeon Hall. There are five hundred stone statues dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) inside this temple shrine hall. These statues are between 30 to 33 centimetres in height, and they were first sculpted in the late 1990’s. These statues are then fronted by sixteen larger statues dedicated to the Nahan, and they stand 50 centimetres in height. The central image that sits on the main altar inside the Nahan-jeon Hall is a stone statue of Seokgamoni-bul.

To the rear of the Nahan-jeon Hall is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, which is unadorned around its exterior walls all but for the basic dancheong colours. Taking up residence inside this shrine hall is another stone statue; this time, dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). This statue is joined on either side by a stone statue of Mudokgwi-wang (The King of Ghosts Who Purifies People’s Minds) and Domyeong-jonja. Also joining this stone statue of Jijang-bosal is another of the Bodhisattva of the Afterlife. This statue is backed by a mural of Jijang-bosal and the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld).

How To Get There

Because Singwangsa Temple is actually located closer to the neighbouring city of Tongyeong, you’ll need to get to the Tongyeong Intercity Bus Terminal first. And from the Tongyeong Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take a taxi because there’s no bus that goes directly to Singwangsa Temple. The taxi will take about 25 minutes and cost you about 14,000 won.

Overall Rating: 8/10

While it costs a fair bit to drive from Geoje-do Island from Busan, especially when you use the underwater Gadeok Tunnel, Singwangsa Temple certainly didn’t disappoint. The temple is filled with shrine halls including the underground Cheonbul-jeon Hall. In addition to the beautiful artwork that populates these shrine halls, have a look for the island shrine dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). With all this, you’ll have more than enough reason to visit the rather special Singwangsa Temple in the island city of Geoje, Gyeongsangnam-do.

The beautiful environs around Singwangsa Temple in Geoje, Gyeongsangnam-do. The road leading up to the temple. The large Daeung-jeon Hall at Singwangsa Temple. The main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The outdoor island shrine dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) to the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall. A different angle to the amazing outdoor shrine. A look inside the subterranean Cheonbul-jeon Hall. The statue of Mireuk-bul behind the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. A look inside the Nahan-jeon Hall. And the main altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall.
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[Chapter Book : 돈이 되고 싶은 아이] 5장 짝이 불쌍해 보여요 (for Intermediate and Advanced)

Tue, 2021-03-02 23:45

Instagram     YouTube

Hi 안녕하세요 I'm Won!
I hope this channel is helpful

Private Korean lesson (Conversation, Pronunciation, Writing etc)
You can check more detail on my Instagram page
[OPEN KAKAO for Worksheet]
https://open.kakao.com/o/gAcU9Sqb
Search by "wonelly" on kakao open chat

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Study Korean at KLIFF and KLIFF Online!

Tue, 2021-03-02 05:24
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email *Study with us at KLIFF and KLIFF Online! Private or Group classes(2 Busan locations)/Online Lessons   Go to KLIFF Online and Check out a free KO class!   For more information, email us at [email protected] or text us at 010.9108.6594 <Korean Language Foreigners For Foreigners> https://www.kliffonline.com

 

IMG_4553.JPG

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

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Korean classes in March!

Tue, 2021-03-02 04:16
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: pnu PNU haeundae Haeundae seomyon pusan busanContact person by email KLIFF Korean classes

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone. Make a change by learning Korean this season. The teachers at KLIFF can help! Think it takes a year to speak Korean well? Think again! In just a month we can get you speaking with the locals! KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from. We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test. We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too! Questions or need directions? Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected]. or [email protected] You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

IMG_4553.JPG

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

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Yong – Dragons: 용

Tue, 2021-03-02 00:23
The View from the Yonghwa-jeon Hall at Tongdosa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do.

This posts contains affiliate links. I receive a percentage of sales, if you purchase the item after clicking on an advertising link at no expense to you. This will help keep the website running. Thanks, as always, for your support!

Introduction

One of the most common things you’ll find at a Korean Buddhist temple is a dragon. You can find them in paintings, statues, adornments, latticework around shrine halls and even under bridges. So why do you find so many dragons are a Korean Buddhist temple?

A dragon and Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) at Daewonsa Temple in Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do. History of the Korean Dragon

As Buddhism started to migrate eastward from India, it started to take on local influences and forms. One great example of this can be seen when Buddhism started to spread throughout China during the Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.). When Buddhism entered into China, the dragon first came as a Naga. Naga, as in Hinduism, takes the form of a great cobra. They are divine, or semi-divine deities, or even a semi-divine race of half-human/half-serpent beings that are raised in Patala (a subterranean realm of the universe). As a result, they are primarily depicted in three forms. They can be wholly human with snakes on their heads or necks, a serpent, or as half-human/half-snake. Some Naga are capable of using magic powers to transform themselves into humans. As for how they interact with human beings, Naga are potentially dangerous, but they are also helpful, protective, and beneficial to humans.

With Buddhism firmly being established during the Six Dynasties (220-589 A.D.) in China, the Naga became a dragon. And with the migration of Buddhism to the Korean peninsula from China taking place first in the Goguryeo Kingdom (37 B.C. – 668 A.D.) in 372 A.D., dragons, instead of Naga, migrated to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (57 B.C. – 668 A.D.), as well.

A dragon mural that adorns the side of the Yonghwa-jeon Hall at Tongdosa Temple. Korean Dragon’s Appearance and Symbolic Meaning

In Korean, dragons are known as “yong” or “ryong.” In appearance, they can have deer antlers, a snake belly, a fish tail, claws, and whiskers. They can also be a number of colours like blue, red, yellow, green, or brown.

Another thing that differentiates Korean dragons from other dragons is that they have longer beards. Also, you’ll usually see a Korean dragon with an orb, which is known as a “Yeouiju – 여의주” in Korean. This is a Cintamani, or wish-fulfilling jewel. It can be held in its claws or mouth. It’s believed that whoever holds a Yeouiju has the power of omnipotence and creation. Another feature that differentiates Korean dragons is that they have four toes to hold and wield the Yeouiju, as opposed to lesser three-toed dragons.

However, unlike the western idea of dragons, which are thought to be destructive and harmful, dragons in Korea are thought to be a sign of good luck. In fact, dragons are thought to be the bearer of good fortunate and spiritual clarity because of their loud voices. Their voices clear away any and all delusions of corrupting thought. In Korea, dragons are said to have power over the sea, floods, and storms. And specifically in Buddhism, they are thought to be one of eight kinds of protective deities that help guard the teachings of the Buddha (the dharma).

Where to Find Korean Dragons

There are numerous places that you can find dragons at a Korean Buddhist temple. Here are eight specific examples of where you can find these dragons.

The Dragon Ship of Wisdom

The Dragon Ship of Wisdom, which is known as “Banya Yongseon-do – 반야 용선도” in Korean, is a ship that transports people across the Sea of Samsara. In Korean, Samsara is known as “Yunhwi – 윤회.” Samsara, or Yunhwi, refers to the idea of the cycle of life: birth, death, and rebirth. As the name of the ship kind of gives away, The Dragon Ship of Wisdom is shaped like a dragon (go figure!?). It has the head of a dragon for the bow and the tail of the dragon as the stern. Typically, the dragon shaped ship is painted blue with a handful of occupants sailing across Samsara. The Dragon Ship of Wisdom is being ferried across Samsara by two Bodhisattvas at either end of the vessel. (Picture from Tongdosa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do).

Temple Shrine Hall Adornments

Oftentimes you’ll see a pair of dragon heads near the entry of a temple shrine hall, book-ending the nameplate of the specific shrine hall. These dragons that protrude outwards from the eaves of a temple shrine hall are meant to symbolically represent the Dragon Ship of Wisdom. So by entering a temple shrine hall, one is being transported across the Sea of Samsara. These dragons are one of the more misunderstood dragons that you’ll find at a Korean Buddhist temple. More often than not, they’re simply thought of as being ornamental, but everything at Korean Buddhist temples, especially the artwork, has meaning. (Picture from Magoksa Temple in Gongju, Chungcheongnam-do).

Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha)

As for the Mireuk-jeon Hall, which is where Mireuk-bul commonly takes up residence at a Korean Buddhist temple, this temple shrine is also known as a Yonghwa-jeon. Yonghwa means “Dragon Flower” in English, while jeon means “hall.” This connection to a dragon might seem a bit confusing at first; however, according to Buddhist tradition, when Mireuk-bosal returns to Earth as Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha), he will have attained his Buddhahood under a Dragon Flower Tree. Furthermore, dragons are thought to have a countless amount of scales on their bodies, which is a symbol of the infinite. It’s also symbolic of a dragon’s immeasurable power. Another connection to the dragon for Mireuk-bul is the belief that Mireuk-bul turned into a dragon spirit as he entered into a meditative state while awaiting to achieve Buddhahood. This also connects the idea of a dragon’s ability as a shape-shifter to appear in any number of forms to help people towards Jeongto (The Pure Land). (Picture from Tongdosa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do).

The Sacheonwang (The Four Heavenly Kings)

Another connection that dragons have to Korean Buddhist temples is through the Sacheonwang, who, in English, are known as the Four Heavenly Kings. The specific connection that dragons have to the Four Heavenly Kings is through Gwangmok Cheonwang (or Virupaksha in Sanskrit). Nagas are followers of Gwangmok Cheonwang (don’t forget that Nagas became dragons during their migration eastwards). The Four Heavenly Kings are guardians of Mt. Sumeru, which is the physical, metaphysical, and spiritual centre of the universes. As a result of this devotion of the Nagas, you can typically see a dragon being held in the right hand of Gwangmok Cheonwang. (Picture from Bulguksa Temple in Gyeongju).

Poroe (The Bell Dragon)

Traditionally, a dragon adorns the top of a Korean temple bell. The hooks that hold the bell to the rafters on a temple bell are usually shaped like a dragon. As a result, they are called “dragon hooks.” In Korean, this dragon is known as as Poroe – 포뢰. Poroe has a bit of a phobia. Poroe is afraid of whales. And according to this myth, when Poroe sees a whale, Poroe cries out. The reason this is important is that the striker that hits the bell, traditionally, is a whale-shaped striker. So when the whale-shaped striker hits the bell, Poroe, who crowns the bell, lets out a loud scream. This allows the bell to make a louder noise. That’s why, in Korea, the sound that a bell makes is called a “whale sound.” (Picture from Seokbulsa Temple in Buk-gu, Busan).

Datjib (The Main Altar Canopy)

Datjib, in Korean, is a compound word. “Dat” means separate, while “jib” means house. Another name for a datjib is “celestial canopy,” which is a reference to the airy feeling that the roof-shaped structure possesses.

As for the design of the datjib, it’s made of wood, and the woodwork consists of finely interconnected brackets that have been ornately decorated. The pillar of the datjib are usually thin, which helps contribute to the airy feel of the design. Surrounding the typically red painted datjib are dragons, phoenixes, lotus flowers, Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities), and other celestial deities. At a glance, the canopy looks like a mini-palace. As for the dragon or dragons that take up residence near the datjib, they are meant in their more traditional role as protectors. (Picture from Samgwangsa Temple in Busanjin-gu, Busan).

Temple Bridges

Sometimes if you look under a bridge at a Korean Buddhist temple like Seonamsa Temple’s Seungseon-gyo Bridge in Suncheon, Jeollanam-do, you’ll find a dragon. Not only are dragons listeners of the dharma (Buddhist teachings), but they are also protectors. So some temples with streams have bridges spanning them. On the underside of the bridge or near the wall of the stream, you’ll find a dragon. The reason you’ll find a dragon on the underside of the temple’s bridge is to prevent malevolent spirits from riding the stream water and entering the temple grounds. (Picture from Seonamsa Temple in Suncheon, Jeollanam-do).

Yongwang (The Dragon King)

The name of the shaman deity kind of gives it all away. Yongwang (The Dragon King) is a shaman deity that can be found either in a Yongwang-dang Hall or a Samseong-gak Hall alongside other shaman deities like Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and/or Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). Traditionally, Yongwang is the deity of lakes, rivers, ponds, waters, seas, stream, or pretty much anything to do with water. There’s a belief that there’s a world beneath the sea. And in this world, Yongwang rules in his Dragon Palace called “Yonggung” in Korean. And an easy way to identify Yongwang is that he’s always with a dragon. Sometimes these dragons fly all around him, and sometimes he’s flying one. And if he is in fact riding a dragon, this act symbolizes his dominance over the dragon. (Picture from Gwaneumsa Temple in Jeju City, Jeju-do).

A mural that adorns the Daeung-jeon Hall at Haedong Yonggungsa Temple in Gijang-gun, Busan. Dragon Temples

There are a few temples in Korea with the word dragon in their name. Great examples of this can be found at Hwangnyongsa-ji Temple Site in Gyeongju; Guryongsa Temple in Wonju, Gangwon-do; Hongryongsa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do; and Yongjusa Temple in Hwaseong, Gyeonggi-do.

In addition to temples using dragons in their names, there are several famous temples throughout Korea that have dragons in their founding creation myths like Buseoksa Temple in Yeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do; Haedong Yonggungsa Temple in Gijang-gun, Busan; Tongdosa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do; and Bunhwangsa Temple in Gyeongju.

Conclusion

So as you can see, dragons play an integral part in the artwork, history, and architecture of Korean Buddhist temples. The images and representations of dragons are diverse in their artistry and originality. So take a look around you the next time you’re at a Korean Buddhist temple and see just how many dragons you can see flying around the temple grounds.

The mural that illustrates Uisang-daesa’s voyage back to the Korean peninsula from Tang China on the Bota-jeon Hall at Naksansa Temple in Yangyang, Gangwon-do.
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Korean vs Japanese Markers (은/는 vs は, 이/가 vs が) | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2021-03-01 18:25

Occasionally I like to make niche videos that I know many people aren't going to watch, but that are still important.

Although my channel is about Korean, there have been a lot of people asking me if the Japanese markers are interchangeable with Korean markers.

This video attempts to answer that question.

Specifically this video will cover the differences between the Korean Topic Markers (은/는) and Subject Markers (이/가) and the Japanese Topic Marker (は) and Subject Marker (が).

The post Korean vs Japanese Markers (은/는 vs は, 이/가 vs が) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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