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full time in Busan ASSP

Koreabridge - Thu, 2021-11-04 06:32
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: BusanContact person by email

Hello. My name is Danny. I've lived and worked in Busan for over 12 years. I'm looking for a new position, either part time or full-time. I am very outgoing and if given a chance, your elementary and middle school students will like me.I have a transferrable E2 visa and am available ASAP. So, if you want a charismatic teacher, who knows how to keep students interested, please let me know. I'll be happy to work for you.

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Korea & Singapore Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL) Details 2021

Koreabridge - Thu, 2021-11-04 05:22

The recently announced Korea & Singapore Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL) is due to begin on November 15th, 2021, allowing quarantine-free travel between Singapore and South Korea for tourists and other travellers.

After months of restricted travel, this is a welcome first step towards a return to normal air travel. However, there are still a number of restrictions in place and rules that must be followed to be able to enjoy quarantine-free travel on the Korea & Singapore VTL.

Travel between Singapore and South Korea on the Vaccinated Travel Lane is not the same in each direction. Requirements in Singapore and South Korea are different and, if you plan on making a return journey, you will need to be aware of both sets of VTL requirements.

This article provides details of all of those requirements, as well as links to relevant websites to book PCR tests, arrange entry visas, and more.

I hope this will take the stress out of travelling and make your trip safe, smooth and enjoyable.

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What Is The Vaccinated Travel Lane?

The Korea & Singapore Vaccinated Travel Lane is a travel bubble between the two countries that allows fully vaccinated people to travel without having to quarantine on arrival.

It begins on November 15th, 2021, and is open for all travellers moving between the two countries, including those who are travelling for tourism.

At present, there are a number of conditions and restricted to the Vaccinated Travel Lane that can be confusing.

To avoid any problems when travelling between Singapore and Korea, this article will cover who can travel (plus exceptions), how to travel without quarantine, and which flights you can take for the VTL.

Who Can Use The Vaccinated Travel Lane?

The following people are eligible to use the Vaccinated Travel Lane between South Korea and Singapore:

  • People who have been in Singapore or South Korea for at least 14 days before travelling.*
  • People who have been fully vaccinated in either Singapore or South Korea.*
  • Unvaccinated children 5 years and younger.

*Travellers to Singapore may also travel or be vaccinated in other VTL countries

There are some important things to note about who is or isn’t eligible when considering whether or not you can use the VTL.

  1. You need to remain in Singapore or South Korea for 14 days before travelling. You can’t travel to a 3rd country within these 14 days or you will be ineligible to travel with the VTL.
  2. Your vaccine certificate must be in English and issued in either Singapore or South Korea. There are exceptions for travellers who are going to Singapore, explained later.
  3. Unvaccinated children over the age of 5 years old (6+) will not be able to travel on the VTL from Singapore to South Korea. This will be a problem for children aged 6 – 11 years of age as they aren’t able to get vaccinated at present.

The next section will explain more about vaccination and other requirements for travelling between Singapore and South Korea through the VTL.

Korea & Singapore VTL Requirements

This section will explain the requirements for travelling between Singapore and South Korea using the Vaccinated Travel Lanes.

There are different rules for travelling from Singapore to South Korea or from South Korea to Singapore. I’ll break these down in the two sections below.

If you plan to book a return trip, please be aware of the different requirements for each leg of the journey.

1: Singapore To Korea VTL Requirements.

Here are the requirements to travel on the Vaccinated Travel Lane from Singapore to South Korea. Details of travel from South Korea to Singapore are covered in the next section.

Purpose of Travel: Individual, group, commercial or tourism purposes are allowed on the VTL. Valid visas are also required, if applicable.

Travel Restrictions: Must not have travelled outside of Singapore in the last 14 days before departure.

Vaccination Requirements: Fully vaccinated for at least 14 days before travel with a WHO approved vaccine (Emergency Use List). Children 5 years and under do not need to be vaccinated.

Vaccination Certificates: must be in English and issued in Singapore or South Korea.

K-ETA Visa Requirements: All travellers to Korea from Singapore must have an approved K-ETA (Electronic Travel Authorisation) visa before travelling to Korea. This can be done online on the K-ETA website.

*Korean nationals and permanent residents do not require a K-ETA.

K-ETA website

*The K-ETA for Singapore is not yet active, but should be available before the start of the VTL on November 15th.

Visa Requirements: Singaporean citizens don’t need a visa to travel to Korea and can travel visa-free for up to 90 days. Travellers from Singapore that are not Singaporean citizens may need a visa. Please check with the Korean embassy for more details.

Pre-Departure PCR Testing: You must take a pre-departure COVID-19 PCR test up to 72 hours before departure and obtain a negative result. You must get an electronic or physical copy of the result to travel.

Singapore PCR Test Locations

On-Arrival PCR Testing: You should book an on-arrival PCR test for the date you will arrive in South Korea. You can book this online and complete the test after clearing customs.

Incheon Airport PCR Testing

*You must self-quarantine at a hotel or residence until you receive your negative result. If you test positive, you will have to undergo the mandatory 10 day self-quarantine provided at a Korean government facility.

Further PCR Tests: If you’re staying for more than 7 days, you must get a second PCR test on Day 6 or Day 7 (your arrival day is Day 0). After the test, you must self-quarantine again at your hotel until you get the results.

Self-Check Mobile App: All arrivals to Korea must install the Self-Check Mobile App to record and report their health status, including any possible symptoms of COVID-19.

Self-Check Mobile App

Travel Insurance: You must book COVID-19 Travel Insurance* with coverage of at least 30,000,000 Korean won (S$34,000). This only applies to short term travellers and not people moving to work or study long-term.

COVID-19 Travel Insurance

*not required for Korean nationals or permanent residents.

Flight Restrictions: You can only travel on certain direct flights between the two countries. Details of which flights are included later on.

2: Korea To Singapore VTL Requirements

Here are the requirements to travel on the Vaccinated Travel Lane from South Korea to Singapore. There are some differences between these requirements and those for travelling from Singapore to South Korea.

Purpose of Travel: Individual, group, commercial or tourism purposes are allowed on the VTL. Valid visas are also required, if applicable.

Travel Restrictions: Must not have travelled outside of South Korea, Singapore, or any other VTL country* in the last 14 days before departure.

*Singapore VTL countries include Brunei (only 1-way), Germany, Canada, Denmark, France, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, UK, USA, Australia (1-way from Nov 8th, 2-way from Nov 21st), Switzerland (From Nov 8th)

Vaccination Requirements: Fully vaccinated for at least 14 days before travel with a WHO approved vaccine (Emergency Use List). Children 5 years and under do not need to be vaccinated.

Vaccination Certificates: must be in English and issued in either Singapore, South Korea, or any other VTL country (see above). All vaccine certificates must be digitally certifiable (i.e. have a QR code for verification).

Apply For A VTP In Advance: Travellers to Singapore must apply for a Vaccinated Travel Pass (VTP) between 30 and 7 days before travelling to Singapore. This applies to short-term visitors and long-term pass holders only.*

VTP Website

*Singaporean nationals and permanent residents do not require a VTP.

SG Arrival Card: Similar to the K-ETA, travellers to Singapore must apply for the SG Arrival Card to be able to enter the country. This must be submitted within 3 days before your arrival in Singapore.

SG Arrival Card Website

Visa Requirements: Korea citizens don’t need a visa to travel to Singapore and can travel visa free for up to 90 days. Travellers from Korea that are not Korean citizens may need a visa. Please check with the Singaporean embassy for more details.

Singapore Visa Requirements

Pre-Departure PCR Testing: You must take a pre-departure COVID-19 PCR test up to 48 hours (not 72 like in Korea) before departure and obtain a negative result. You must get an electronic or physical copy of the result to travel.

Incheon Airport PCR Testing

On-Arrival PCR Testing: You should book an on-arrival PCR test for the date you will arrive in Singapore. You can book this online and complete the test after clearing customs.

Changi Airport PCR Test

*You must self-quarantine at a hotel or residence until you receive your negative result. If you test positive, you will have to undergo the mandatory 14 day self-quarantine.

Trace Together App: All short-term arrivals to Singapore must install the Trace Together App to record and report their health status, including any possible symptoms of COVID-19.

Trace Together App

Travel Insurance: You must book COVID-19 Travel Insurance* with coverage of at least 30,000,000 Korean won (S$34,000). This only applies to short term travellers and not people moving to work or study long term.

COVID-19 Travel Insurance

*not required for Singaporean nationals, permanent residents, or long-term pass holders.

Flight Restrictions: You can only travel on certain direct flights between the two countries. Details of which flights are included next.

What Flights Are Eligible For The VTL?

There are a limited number of flights between South Korea and Singapore that are part of the Vaccinated Travel Lane. These have been designated as VTL flights and you can only travel quarantine-free on one of these flights.

If you book a non-VTL designated flight, you will have to undergo the mandatory quarantine for 7-14 days (depending on the country).

VTL Designated Flights

There are several airlines operating VTL designated flights between Singapore and South Korea. These are:

  • Korean Airlines*
  • Asiana Airlines*
  • Singapore Airlines
  • Scoot

*These airlines also operate non-VTL designated flights

Vaccinated Travel Lane designated flights are all non-stop direct flights between Singapore and South Korea.

Korean Air VTL flights

The following flights are all VTL designated flights operated by Korean Air.

Flight Number:KE646
Route: Singapore to South Korea
Operating Days: Monday, Tuesday, Friday, Sunday
Flight Times: Depart 01:30 – Arrive 08:50

Flight Number: KE645
Route: South Korea to Singapore
Operating Days: Monday, Thursday, Saturday
Flight Times: Depart 18:35 – Arrive 00:10

Asiana Airlines VTL flights

The following flights are all VTL designated flights operated by Asiana Airlines.

Flight Number: OZ752
Route: Singapore to South Korea
Operating Days: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Sunday
Flight Times: Depart 23:00 – Arrive 06:20

Flight Number: OZ751*
Route: South Korea to Singapore
Operating Days: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Sunday
Flight Times: Depart 16:20 – Arrive 21:55

*This route is not expected to operate until December 5th, 2021

Singapore Airlines VTL flights

The following flights are all VTL designated flights operated by Singapore Airlines.

Flight Number: SQ608
Route: Singapore to South Korea
Operating Days: Wednesday, Friday, Sunday
Flight Times: Depart 01:25 – Arrive 08:50

Flight Number: SQ607
Route: South Korea to Singapore
Operating Days: Wednesday, Friday, Sunday
Flight Times: Depart 10:50 – Arrive 16:15

Flight Number: SQ600
Route: Singapore to South Korea
Operating Days: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday
Flight Times: Depart 08:05 – Arrive 15:30

Flight Number: SQ601
Route: South Korea to Singapore
Operating Days: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday
Flight Times: Depart 16:35 – Arrive 22:20

Scoot VTL flights

The following flights are all VTL designated flights operated by Scoot.

Flight Number: TR840
Route: Singapore to South Korea
Operating Days: Monday
Flight Times: Depart 01:25 – Arrive 08:50

Flight Number: TR841
Route: South Korea to Singapore
Operating Days: Monday
Flight Times: Depart 10:30 – Arrive 16:15

Non-VTL Designated Flights

The following flights are non-VTL designated flights, meaning you won’t be able to travel quarantine-free if you book them:

  • KE643 (Korean Air) – Sunday
  • OZ751 (Asiana) – Saturday
Where To Book VTL Designated Flights

You can book Vaccinated Travel Lane flights on any major flight-checker website.

Be sure to check that these are VTL designated flights and it would probably be best to book flexible tickets, just in case. The small extra expense can save you a lot if things go wrong.

Check Flights Travelling To Korea This Winter?

Do you dream of seeing the royal palaces of Seoul covered in snow? Want to experience freezing cold temperatures (and below)? Not sure where to visit and what to do during this frosty season?

Then check out some of my other articles about travelling to Korea during winter for the best places to see snow, winter activities to enjoy, and the best foods to keep you warm.

Where To See Snow In Seoul What To Do In Winter Amazing Korean Winter Food

If you’re looking for some great activities to enjoy in South Korea this winter, why not check out Jeju Island, a semi-tropical wonder of the world that has snow, fresh oranges, and palm trees all in one place.

Jeju Island In Winter FAQ About The Vaccinated Travel Lane Who Can Travel On The Singapore Korea VTL?

Anyone who has been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks before departure with a WHO EUL approved vaccine with an approved vaccine certificate (digital only for Singapore) in English may travel on the Singapore Korea Vaccinated Travel Lane. Other conditions apply, such as residing in the country for at least 14 days before departure.

Can I Use The Singapore Korea VTL If I’m Not Vaccinated?

No, only fully vaccinated people who have been fully vaccinated for at least 14 days before departure can travel on the Singapore Korea Vaccinated Travel Lane.

Can Unvaccinated Children Travel On The Singapore Korea VTL?

Children 5 years and younger do not need to be vaccinated and can travel on the Singapore Korea Vaccinated Travel Lane. However, children 6 and over need to be fully vaccinated to use the VTL. This may be an issue for families travelling with unvaccinated children.

Can I Use Any Flight For The Singapore Korea VTL?

No, you must use specific VTL-designated flights to be eligible to use the Singapore Korea Vaccinated Travel Lane. If you book a flight that isn’t a VTL-designated flight, you will have to do the mandatory quarantine present in either country.

Do I Need To Take A PCR Test To Use The VTL?

Yes, you will need to take a PCR test before travelling (48 or 72 hours before, depending on the country of arrival) and once you arrive at the airport. You should book these in advance to avoid delays.

Share Your Thoughts

If you enjoyed reading this article, or if you have any thoughts about it that you want to share, please feel free to leave a message in the comments below. I’d love to hear your feedback about this article and the subject.

If you have any more questions about travelling to Korea or the VTL, then you can also ask in the Korea Travel Advice group on Facebook.

Korea Travel Advice Group Related Articles .wp-show-posts-columns#wpsp-2937 {margin-left: -2em; }.wp-show-posts-columns#wpsp-2937 .wp-show-posts-inner {margin: 0 0 2em 2em; } 50 Unique Korean Experiences For Your South Korea Bucket List How To Survive Summer In Seoul: 10 Tips To Stay Cool How To Go To Naejangsan National Park: Fall Foliage Hotspot

Travel tips to help you explore, travel, enjoy, and see all the joy and wonders of South Korea

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moving sale 2

Koreabridge - Thu, 2021-11-04 04:53
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Jangjeon, near PNUContact person by email

Glass 6 pice, 5000 woon

Gigsaw floor covering 30 pice, 5000 woon

 

Send message to KAkao ID: JAE2210

13.jpg photo_2021-11-04_13-26-36.jpg
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Moving sale

Koreabridge - Thu, 2021-11-04 04:33
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Jangjeon, near PNUContact person by email -Carpet 2*2.5 m^2, 20000 woon -Skateboard 5000 woon _mirror 5000 woon -small size suitcase traveler 5000 woon each -lunch table 5000 woon shelf 5000 woon -30 highlighter 5000 woon -table and chair 5000 woon -Jar 5000 woon -double bed frame, 5000 woon

 

Send message to KAkao ID: JAE2210

7.jpg 8.jpg 1_26.jpg 12.jpg 2_23.jpg 11.jpg 14.jpg 1.jpg 3.jpg 6.jpg
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How to Voting Hangeulsong #shorts

Koreabridge - Thu, 2021-11-04 02:49

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Songnimsa Temple – 송림사 (Chilgok, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2021-11-03 23:29
One of the Underworld Paintings Adorning the Myeongbu-jeon Hall at Songnimsa Temple in Chilgok, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Songnimsa Temple is located on the southern slopes of the beautiful Mt. Palgongsan (1192.3 m) in Chilgok, Gyeongsangbuk-do. And the temple is located among other historical temples on Mt. Palgongsan like Donghwasa Temple and Pagyesa Temple. The name of the temple, Songnimsa, means “Pine Forest Temple” in English. The temple was first established in 545 A.D. during the fifth year of King Jinheung of Silla’s reign (r. 540 – 576 A.D.). Songnimsa Temple was built to enshrine the Buddha’s sari (crystallized remains) that were brought to the Korean peninsula from China by the Buddhist monk Myeonggwan. Songnimsa Temple was later destroyed in 1243. Fortunately for us, it was rebuilt in 1689.

The temple is home to an amazing four Korean Treasures. These Korean Treasures include the Five-story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple, which is Korean Treasure #189; the Reliquaries from the Five-story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple, which is Korean Treasure #325; the Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Songnimsa Temple, which is Korean Treasure #1605; and the Stone Seated Amitabha Buddha Triad of Songnimsa Temple, which is Korean Treasure #1606.

Admission to Songnimsa Temple is free.

Temple Layout

You’ll first pass by the newly built Iljumun Gate and under the Boje-ru Pavilion to gain entry to the main temple courtyard at Songnimsa Temple. Straight ahead of you in a field of grass is the Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple. The pagoda is believed to date back the 9th century during Later Silla (668 – 935 A.D.). This Korean Treasure is reminiscent of the brick pagodas at Bunhwangsa Temple in Gyeongju and Silleuksa Temple in Yeoju, Gyeonggi-do. The five-story structure consists of a main body of earthen bricks and a single layer platform made of granite. With the pagoda being made of bricks, the roof stones to each story are crowned and sloped. The gilt-bronze finial atop the pagoda is a replica that was made in 1595 during restoration work. And while it’s a replica, it helps historians better understand the upper part of pagodas that were created during Later Silla (668 – 935 A.D.).

The Reliquaries from the Five-story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple (Picture courtesy of the Cultural Heritage Administration).

Also found during repair work on the pagoda in 1959 were many relics inside the Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple. These are known as the Reliquaries from the Five-story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple, and they are Korean Treasure #325. On the first story of the pagoda, there were two wood, two stone, and two bronze Buddha statues that were discovered. In the second story of the brick structure, there was a reliquary found from the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). They included a gilt-bronze stupa that was made of a thin gold plate. Additionally, a long-necked sari bottle made from green glass was also discovered. This green glass was adorned with jade and pearls. All were discovered inside a tortoise-shaped stone case. In the third story of the structure, a stone box with a wooden lid was discovered. Inside this stone box were decomposed papers. The over-turned bowl on the roof stone of the fifth story of the brick pagoda contained a round-shaped inlaid celadon case and two gilt-bronze ear ornaments. It’s believed that this artwork dates back to the late 12th century when inlaid celadon was flourishing artistically. In addition to all this, there were 281 beads, fifteen silver rings, and seven aromatic pieces of wood discovered inside the pagoda. And because the various items span a stretch of time starting during Later Silla and continuing into the mid-Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), it’s obvious that the brick pagoda was repaired numerous times. The Reliquaries from the Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple can now be found at the Daegu National Museum.

To the rear of the Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple can be found the Daeung-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to the Daeung-jeon Hall are adorned with beautiful; yet simplistic, Shimu-do (The Ox-Herding Murals). Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the largest historic wooden Buddha statues in all of Korea. The central image is that of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). And this statue is an impressive 2.77 metres in height. Joining the central image of Seokgamoni-bul are the equally impressive statues dedicated to Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). And while these statues are rather large in size, they are beautifully proportioned, resulting in a balanced aesthetic. Seokgamoni-bul’s ritualized hand gesture is that of the Earth Touching mudra. And the two accompanying Bodhisattvas strike different mudra poses, while also holding onto long lotus stalks in both of their hands. Both the crowns and the lotus flowers seem to have been repaired in more recent years. It’s believed that the main altar statues date back to the mid-17 century, when most major temples were being repaired after the invasions of the Imjin War (1592-98). More specifically, an invocation paper was found inside the Buddha that clarifies when, and by whom, the statues were commissioned. In total, some eighteen sculptor monks were used to complete the project under the watchful eye of the monk Dou. The Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Songnimsa Temple are Korean Treasure #1605.

To the rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall, three additional temple shrine halls can be found. These include the Samseong-gak Hall to the far left. Housed inside this shaman shrine hall are three vibrant murals dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint), Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), and Chilseong (The Seven Stars). To the right rear is a smaller shrine hall solely dedicated to Sanshin. And to the far right is the Eungjin-jeon Hall. Housed inside this temple shrine hall is a gorgeous golden statue dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul in the centre of the main altar. This central image is joined by sixteen statues dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). These statues are then backed by elaborate murals of the Nahan studying, teaching, and learning.

To the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall and the Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. Surrounding the exterior walls of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall are some of the most terrifying murals dedicated to the afterlife in all of Korea. Their punishment is grotesquely illustrated on the Judgment Hall after having a mirror held up to them, reflecting their misdeeds in their former lives. After that, their judgment is read to them by one of the Siwang (Ten Kings of the Underworld). Expect to see disturbing illustrations of people boiling in water; people with their tongues being torn out of their mouths; and people roasting over spikes and hot coals, essentially a Buddhist version of Dante’s Inferno.

And to the left of both the Daeung-jeon Hall and the Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple is the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. Housed inside this hall that also includes one thousand statues of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas is a main altar triad centred by Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). This central image is joined on either side by Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). This main altar triad is known as the Stone Seated Amitabha Buddha Triad of Songnimsa Temple, and they are Korean Treasure #1606. The statues were completed in 1655. The statues are made from zeolite, which is a soft and porous stone. The stones originally came from the Gyeongju area. And again, the statues were created by the monk Dou and his team of sculptures.

How To Get There

Songnimsa Temple is a bit tricky to get to. And if you’re not taking a taxi, you can take Bus #427 to Dongmyeong/Giseong-dong from the Daegu Bukbu bus stop. You’ll need to get off at the Giseong-ri stop. From this stop, you can walk to Songnimsa Temple.

Overall Rating: 8/10

The temple rates as high as it does because it’s home to four Korean Treasures. And one of those treasures is the amazing Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple. Other highlights to look for are the statues, which are also Korean Treasures, inside both the Daeung-jeon Hall and the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. The hellish artwork surrounding the Myeongbu-jeon Hall and the stunning shaman murals housed inside the Samseong-gak Hall are other things to look for, as well. There’s so much to see and enjoy at this lesser known temple on Mt. Palgongsan.

The temple courtyard at Songnimsa Temple. The Five-Story Brick Pagoda of Songnimsa Temple. A look inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. One of the accompanying Bodhisattvas inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. Joined to the right by the other. One of the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals) that adorns the exterior walls of the Daeung-jeon Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall to the rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall. The Dokseong (Lonely Saint) mural inside the Samseong-gak Hall. To the right is the Sanshin-gak Hall and the Nahan-jeon Hall. A look inside the colourful Nahan-jeon Hall. Another of the Underworld murals adorning the exterior walls of the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. And yet another of these frightening murals. The main altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. And a look inside the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

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AIESEC in PNU - Come & Act Project

Koreabridge - Wed, 2021-11-03 15:02
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://www.aiesec.org

 

AIESEC in PNU's Come & Act IVY Program

 

Let's dive into a Global Conference with Global Leaders!

 

Detailed information in the booklet

https://bit.ly/Come_Act_IVY_Winter 

 

<Come & Act project>

√ An online conference based on SDGs NO.4: Quality Education for youth

√ Discuss global issues about Human rights, Environment, Education, Technology with people around the world in English.

√ In the manner of lecture & discussion & online activity

√ Five weeks long project (Project preparation & realization ~ Debrief)

 

<Main Activities>

√ For each Topic, two volunteers will be assigned, based on your preference. The topics are the following: Human rights, Environment, Education, and Technology.. 

√ Each of you will prepare your lecture based on the theme in charge.

√ Lead your lecture and discuss with delegates about related topics.

√ Facilitate the global conference as a passionate volunteer.

* Even if you are assigned to a certain theme, you are required to participate in every given session. You have a responsibility to help the conference proceed smoothly.

 

<IVY Volunteers>

√ Foreigners aged 18 to 32, residing in South Korea who can communicate in English

√ Those who are interested in at least one topic among Human rights, Environment, Education, Technology

√ Those who are interested in a cross-cultural exchange

 

<IVY Application Process>

  1. Fill the interest form to find SDGs which you are interested in
  2. Fill the project application form to apply for Come&Act
  3. Get an Interview with the project team (scheduled individually)
  4. Incoming Preparation Seminar(OT) (Dec 27th 2021) 

 

What are you waiting for?

Speak your dreams into existence!

You are never too cool to learn something new with people in the world!

 

Fill out this interest form right now!

http://bit.ly/IVY_Interest_Winter_2022_PNU

 

For more information, contact us!

- Project Executive: Eunbin Lee, Tel) 010-6637-6550 / E-mail) [email protected]

- Team Leader: Baerim Jeon, Tel) 010-9594-1678 / E-mail) [email protected]

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Teaser: Halloween Vlog Coming Soon (We Are Squid Game Family.)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2021-11-03 14:30
— From Korea with Love
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Hangeul Song contest │후보 4 │Christina Pierre

Koreabridge - Wed, 2021-11-03 04:08

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The Exporter of Buddhism – The Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.)

Koreabridge - Mon, 2021-11-01 23:27
The Baekje Kingdom in 375 A.D., Some Nine Years After the Introduction of Buddhism to the Kingdom.

The Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.) was a strong kingdom that existed for well over six hundred years. The Baekje Kingdom controlled a vast area of land at the height of its power. The Baekje Kingdom mostly controlled the western portion of the Korean peninsula from north of Pyongyang, North Korea down to the southern-most portions of modern day Jeollanam-do. It was founded by King Onjo (r. 18 B.C. – 28 A.D.) at Wiryeseong (present-day southern Seoul). Also, the Baekje Kingdom became a significant maritime power with political and trade relations with both Japan and parts of China.

A full twelve years after Buddhism arrived on the Korean peninsula, in the Goguryeo Kingdom (37 B.C. – 668 A.D.), it spread to the Baekje Kingdom in 384 A.D. It was first brought by an Indian monk named Marananta, during the first year of King Chimnyu of Baekje‘s reign (r. 384 – 385). He came from Eastern Jin (266 – 420 A.D.); however, there is very little known about this monk that was so vital to the introduction of Buddhism to the Baekje Kingdom. In the Samguk Sagi, or the “History of the Three Kingdoms” in English, however, there is mention of Marananta’s introduction of Buddhism to the Baekje Kingdom. “In the month [of the year of his coronation], a monk from Ho, China, called Marananta, came from China. The king welcomed him into the palace and treated him with respect. That was the beginning of Buddhism [in Baekje].”

An image of the monk Marananta, who helped introduce Buddhism to the Baekje Kingdom.

This introduction of Buddhism is further corroborated by the Samguk Yusa, or the “Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms,” in English, when it states, “In the following year, the year of Uryu [385 A.D.], a Buddhist monastery was built in the new capital, Hansanju, and ten monks were installed in it. This was the beginning of Baekje Buddhism.” As these two quotes affirm, Buddhism was openly accepted by the Baekje royal court. This then allowed for the free spread of Buddhism throughout the entire kingdom. This was further solidified in 392 A.D. by the Baekje king, when he ordered his people to “Believe in Buddhism and receive good fortune.” In just eight short years, the new religion of Buddhism had firmly established itself in the Baekje Kingdom.

In under a hundred years, the Baekje Kingdom would simply struggle to survive. To survive, the Baekje capital moved to Gongju in 475 A.D. Not long after this move, the capital moved back to Sabi. It was during this time that Baekje society underwent extensive social change. King Seong of Baekje, who will be spoken of a bit more in depth later, continued this reorganization during his reign from 523 – 554 A.D. Some of this social reorganization also found its way into the religious sphere. King Seong supported the spread of Buddhism to help solidify the Baekje Kingdom’s spiritual foundation. In doing this, he also hoped to strengthen Baekje society as a whole, as well. In addition to these domestic reforms, King Seong also strengthened ties with the Southern Dynasties of China. With these ties and reforms, King Seong attempted to recover land that was formally Baekje’s in the Han River basin; however, when the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.) betrayed the Baekje Kingdom, this hope was quickly dashed. With this betrayal, the Baekje Kingdom and the Goguryeo Kingdom (37 B.C. – 668 A.D.) formed an alliance against the more powerful Silla Kingdom. Together, these two kingdoms launched repeated attacks against the Silla Kingdom. It was from this point that the Baekje Kingdom and the Silla Kingdom became enemies.

It was also during this time of political turmoil, and during the reign of King Seong, that Buddhism in the Baekje Kingdom really started to make a greater contribution to both Baekje culture and society. No greater example of this contribution can be found than in monk Gyeomik. Monk Gyeomik traveled all the way to India by sea to learn about Buddhist teachings. And in 526 A.D, he returned to the Baekje Kingdom. He was joined by an Indian monk named Vedatta. They returned with texts that focused on the Vinaya (the monks’ rules, as well as the stories that led to their formulation). Together, the two would go on to translate some seventy-two Sanskrit Vinaya texts at Heungnyunsa Temple. The adventures of the monk Gyeomik are important for two very significant reasons. First, Gyeomik traveled by sea to visit India. This journey predates Hyecho’s similar journey by three hundred years. So this makes monk Gyeomik’s journey to India pioneering. The other point that Monk Gyeomik’s adventures illustrate is the educational level of the Baekje Kingdom. For the monk Gyeomik to translate Sanskrit texts truly speaks to just how high the level of education in the Baekje Kingdom must have been at this time.

With the spread and development of Buddhism domestically in the Baekje Kingdom, it stands to reason that it would also be cultivated outside of the Baekje Kingdom borders, as well. Near the end of King Seong’s reign, and in 552 A.D., the Baekje Kingdom introduced Buddhism to Japan. King Seong sent Dalsol Sachigye with several gifts like a golden Buddha statue, a Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) statue, and Buddhist texts. This initial introduction was met with some resistance; however, in time, it would grow to be accepted. Also, several Japanese monks would go on to visit the Baekje Kingdom to learn more about Buddhism. As a result, Baekje Buddhism helped contribute to the early formation and development of Japanese Buddhism.

It was also during this time, in 541 A.D., that the Baekje Kingdom established diplomatic relations with the Liang Dynasty (502 – 557 A.D.) in China. As China was an advanced Buddhist nation, and due to diplomatic ties, Baekje Kingdom temples started to sprout up quicker throughout the kingdom. Also, they were much larger in size, as well.

Mireuksa-ji Temple Site in Iksan, Jeollabuk-do.

The height of Buddhist artistry and architecture in the Baekje Kingdom was reached at Mireuksa Temple in present-day Iksan, Jeollabuk-do. The temple was completed in 602 A.D., and it was a masterpiece of Baekje Buddhist artistry which included a large wooden pagoda book-ended by a pair stone pagodas. In fact, the remnants of one of the stone pagodas is known as the Mireuksa-ji Stone Pagoda, which is Korean National Treasure #15. And the temple site is Historic Site #150, which truly speaks to the overall beauty of the temple.

Unfortunately, and on July 9th, 660 A.D., the coalition of the Silla Kingdom and Tang Dynasty (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) attacked the Baekje Kingdom. Heavily outnumbered, Baekje forces would be completely annihilated at the Battle of Hwangsanbeol, near Nonsan, under the leadership of Gen. Gyebaek. With the utter destruction of the Baekje Kingdom army, the capital of Sabi quickly fell. This resulted in the annexation of the Baekje Kingdom to its long held nemesis, the Silla Kingdom. The Baekje king, King Uija (r. 641 – 660 A.D.), would be exiled off to China, and some of the ruling class would end up in Japan, thus drawing a close to one of Korea’s most powerful kingdoms.

Ginkakuji Temple in Kyoto, Japan. —

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