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Into the Woods & Down By the Sea: Yangyang in Autumn

Koreabridge - Tue, 2017-02-28 23:00
Into the Woods & Down By the Sea: Yangyang in Autumn

This trip was so long ago by now. What happened? Well, first we got a puppy. Then I got busy with work. Then B smashed his ankle, rendering himself immobile. Then, my country started to fall apart.

Since then, I’ve done nothing in the gaps between work except read the news, take Charlie for long, therapeutic walks by the river and stress-eat. Things are only getting worse and, suffice it to say, I need to refocus. It’s important to stay informed and involved. It is equally important not to let a blackhole formed by the worst part of human instincts suck me into it entirely, one executive order at a time.

You’ll notice the format here has changed quite a bit. Part of my blogging block, I realized, came from trying to shoehorn everything I wanted to say into posts about restaurants and food. So I redesigned. And redesigned. And now I think I am happy. I hope it works for everyone else as well.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1160" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?resize=627%2C420" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-23-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 627px) 100vw, 627px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?fit=201%2C300" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C955" class="alignnone wp-image-1155" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?resize=303%2C452" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?resize=201%2C300 201w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C1147 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?resize=686%2C1024 686w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C956 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-18-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 303px) 100vw, 303px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?fit=207%2C300" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?fit=640%2C928" class="alignnone wp-image-1132" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?resize=311%2C451" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?resize=207%2C300 207w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?resize=768%2C1114 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?resize=706%2C1024 706w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?resize=640%2C928 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_162621.jpg?w=1152 1152w" sizes="(max-width: 311px) 100vw, 311px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

So here is a post about a trip we took back at the beginning of October, before reality began to buckle around us. At that point, we had had Charlie for about a month, and between housebreaking and crate-training, all of the 2am, 3am, 4am trips outside for a potty break, we decided we needed a break. A puppy-friendly break, to be clear.

I started searching online for pet-friendly hotels, and it was through this filter that I finally managed to find the great white whale for Americans vacationing in Korea — the cabin in the woods, sized just right for two (or, I suppose, three). Better still, it was on the east coast, in Gangwon-do, my favorite province, with one caveat: If I’m going to eat or socialize, it’s the Jeollas all the way. But you can’t beat Gangwon-do for scenery.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1164" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?resize=631%2C423" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-27-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 631px) 100vw, 631px" data-recalc-dims="1" /> Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?fit=201%2C300" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C957" class="alignnone wp-image-1150" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?resize=308%2C460" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?resize=201%2C300 201w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C1147 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?resize=685%2C1024 685w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C956 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-13-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 308px) 100vw, 308px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?fit=201%2C300" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C957" class="alignnone wp-image-1141" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?resize=310%2C463" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?resize=201%2C300 201w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C1147 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?resize=685%2C1024 685w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C956 640w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-4-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 310px) 100vw, 310px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

The leaves were changing. I wanted to hike. I wanted to cook out over an open flame the way we always used to do on the farm at Thanksgiving. I wanted to follow a creek through the woods. I wanted s’mores, chai hot chocolate and a heated floor, and to not see another person all weekend.

I don’t have any photos of the cookout or the s’mores. Well, I do, but they feature B, who prefers to keep his face to himself. I was too busy eating, cooking, laughing and talking with my husband and keeping an ornery little beagle pup out of everything (especially the chocolate) to snap more than a few quick frames for our own memories. But I do have lots and lots of photos from the hikes.

What I couldn’t take a photo of, anyway — and this is a shame, because I have a feeling you’re not going to believe me — is the smell of pine that reached out and slapped us right in the nose as soon as we climbed out of the car. I didn’t even know it was possible for the air to be that thick and heavy with the scent of anything alive.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1139" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?resize=314%2C210" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-2-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 314px) 100vw, 314px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C208" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C444" class="alignnone wp-image-1144" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?resize=304%2C211" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C208 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C533 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C711 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?resize=100%2C70 100w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C444 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-7-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 304px) 100vw, 304px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1157" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?resize=313%2C210" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-20-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 313px) 100vw, 313px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1148" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?resize=306%2C205" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-11-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 306px) 100vw, 306px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

It was Charlie’s first time out of the house for more than a walk around the neighborhood or down to the river near our house. He was appropriately excited, curious and timid. We wanted to get him used to traveling and new places starting early. He’s an outdoorsy dog and will need a lot of trips like this in the future to counterbalance his city-dwelling status. Basically, me too.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1152" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?resize=627%2C420" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-15-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 627px) 100vw, 627px" data-recalc-dims="1" /> Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?fit=201%2C300" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C957" class="alignnone wp-image-1145" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?resize=209%2C312" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?resize=201%2C300 201w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C1147 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?resize=685%2C1024 685w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C956 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-8-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 209px) 100vw, 209px" data-recalc-dims="1" />  Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?fit=201%2C300" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?fit=640%2C957" class="alignnone wp-image-1135" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?resize=209%2C312" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?resize=201%2C300 201w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?resize=768%2C1147 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?resize=685%2C1024 685w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?resize=640%2C956 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173011_HDR.jpg?w=1099 1099w" sizes="(max-width: 209px) 100vw, 209px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?fit=169%2C300" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?fit=576%2C1024" class="alignnone wp-image-1133" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?resize=177%2C314" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?resize=169%2C300 169w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?resize=768%2C1365 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?resize=576%2C1024 576w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?resize=640%2C1138 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_172421.jpg?w=1137 1137w" sizes="(max-width: 177px) 100vw, 177px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?fit=300%2C234" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?fit=640%2C498" class="alignnone wp-image-1136" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?resize=628%2C490" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?resize=300%2C234 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?resize=768%2C598 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?resize=1024%2C797 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?resize=640%2C498 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?w=1480 1480w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/20161021_173737.jpg?w=1280 1280w" sizes="(max-width: 628px) 100vw, 628px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

We felt so guilty after packing him back into his crate in the car to cart him back to the city that we decided to stop by Seorak Beach, a little ways to the north, which B scoffed and told me didn’t exist. As if he’s seen more of Korea than I have. As if I can’t read Daum Maps, too. Once his pride recovered (and he realized he wouldn’t have to drive an extra 40 minutes north, to Sokcho Beach, which was where he thought I meant when I said “Seorak”), he decided he wanted very much to see how Charlie would respond to the ocean, while I just wanted to savor the clean air and unfurled skylines a little longer.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?fit=300%2C182" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?fit=640%2C389" class="alignnone wp-image-1181" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?resize=630%2C382" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?resize=300%2C182 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?resize=768%2C467 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?resize=1024%2C622 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?resize=640%2C389 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-44-of-44-1.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 630px) 100vw, 630px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1178" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?resize=630%2C422" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-41-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 630px) 100vw, 630px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

The beach was mostly empty, besides a few determined surfers who sat bobbing on their surfboards while what could be referred to as waves on a technicality only made their way past them to the shore. I didn’t think I’d ever see any sadder surfers than the ones who dot the shore along the Gulf of Mexico.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C232" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C494" class="alignnone wp-image-1176" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?resize=615%2C476" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C232 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C594 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C791 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C495 640w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-39-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 615px) 100vw, 615px" data-recalc-dims="1" />  Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1177" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?resize=286%2C191" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-40-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 286px) 100vw, 286px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C179" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C381" class="alignnone wp-image-1173" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?resize=319%2C191" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C179 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C457 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C609 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C381 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-36-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 319px) 100vw, 319px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Charlie watched and whined as B waded out into the surf. Eventually the temptation to follow became too much, and he summoned enough courage to take his first few cautious steps after him.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C178" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C381" class="alignnone wp-image-1174" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?resize=308%2C183" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C178 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C457 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C609 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C381 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-37-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 308px) 100vw, 308px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C179" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C381" class="alignnone wp-image-1172" src="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?resize=309%2C184" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C179 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C457 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C610 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C381 640w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i0.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-35-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 309px) 100vw, 309px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C234" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C499" class="alignnone wp-image-1171" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?resize=306%2C239" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C234 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C598 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C798 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C499 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-34-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 306px) 100vw, 306px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C223" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C476" class="alignnone wp-image-1170" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=313%2C233" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C223 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C571 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C762 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=80%2C60 80w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=260%2C195 260w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=485%2C360 485w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C476 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-33-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 313px) 100vw, 313px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

Then it was game on. Charlie has since become sand’s number one fan. We usually head down to a little patch of beach along the riverbank on our daily walks, and there is no end to what a little beagle nose can find lurking beneath. The number and variety of unearthed and truly huge dead fish I’ve had to hurl into the water before he can make a meal of them would horrify you.

We lingered on the beach eating ice cream and watching the clouds roll in until an internal alarm clock started to sound, warning of the rush hour traffic we would have to face driving back into Seoul if we dawdled much longer.

We packed ourselves back into the car, pulled out of the beach lot and immediately hit Seorak-san traffic. We chugged along the freeway, the exhaust fumes slowing filtering in through the air system reminding us of what we were headed back toward.

“We’re going to have to come back in the spring. And maybe the winter. Maybe every couple of months,” I said. The smell of pine still lingered in the car.

Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1137" src="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?resize=628%2C421" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i1.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0358.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 628px) 100vw, 628px" data-recalc-dims="1" />Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?fit=300%2C201" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?fit=640%2C428" class="alignnone wp-image-1165" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?resize=628%2C421" alt="Yangyang and Sokcho Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?resize=300%2C201 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?resize=768%2C514 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?resize=1024%2C685 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?resize=640%2C428 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Yangyang-edits-28-of-44.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 628px) 100vw, 628px" data-recalc-dims="1" />
Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea.

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?fit=275%2C300" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?fit=640%2C697" class="alignnone wp-image-1188" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?resize=629%2C686" alt="Yangyang and Seorak Beach, South Korea." srcset="https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?resize=275%2C300 275w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?resize=768%2C837 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?resize=940%2C1024 940w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?resize=640%2C697 640w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?w=1280 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.followtherivernorth.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC_0361.jpg?w=1920 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 629px) 100vw, 629px" data-recalc-dims="1" />

[Just a closing note, about Charlie: When we started to think about getting a dog, I knew I wanted a beagle. They are small enough to live in the city, but still active enough to enjoy things like hiking and swimming. They are notoriously energetic and stubborn dogs, but they are also well-known for other traits, such as their shyness and their hesitance to lash out at anyone.

What I didn’t know, and what I dearly wish I had before we found Charlie, is that these latter traits are what make beagles the top breed chosen for animal testing, in Korea as well as the US and other countries.

I have had some serious struggles with the animal adoption people in Korea. I have found them disorganized and condescending. The latter I could make allowances for if it weren’t for the former. Before buying Vera, I attempted to adopt a cat for nearly two months. I went through the overbearing screening process because I knew that these are people who witness the fallout of animals being abandoned by careless owners on a daily basis. But after two months of being promised cats that were given to other owners, only to have them returned and re-offered to me, setting up meetings for home visits that never materialized, and generally being mussed around, I finally gave in and headed to the pet shops.

When it came time to look for a dog, I searched in earnest for beagles among adoption groups, but beagles have a notoriously bad reputation in Korea — in Korean, they are even  referred to as 악마견 — literally, devil dogs. I could hardly find any pet shops that were selling them, let alone any up for adoption (we ended up heading way out of the city to get Charlie).

But the truth is, there are a ton of beagles who need good homes here in Korea. They are rescues from animal testing sites who have had unimaginable things done to them and who have lived their lives almost entirely in cages, only being taken out to be abused.

If you’re interested in adopting a dog, and definitely if you are looking for a beagle, please consider contacting Beagle Rescue Network. We love Charlie and wouldn’t trade him for any dog in the world, but I wish I had known about the situation for beagles before we bought a puppy who would have found a very happy home somewhere else anyway. Puppies are cute, but they are a ton of work and require months of near sleepless nights before they settle into a routine. An adult rescue is a much more manageable alternative.]

The post Into the Woods & Down By the Sea: Yangyang in Autumn appeared first on Follow the River North.

Follow the River North
Followtherivernorth.com

Freelance writer and editor. American in Seoul. I write about Korean food. I blog about all food. Last year I wrote a monthly column about traveling to different places around the country to explore Korean ingredients and cuisine. This ignited my interest in local foods and cooking, which I blog about regularly now. I also blog restaurant and cafe recommendations, recipes and some background and history about Korean food.

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Making the Best of Blue Hour

Koreabridge - Tue, 2017-02-28 04:42
Making the Best of Blue Hour

 

One of the best times to shoot in my opinion is “Blue Hour” This is the period of time after sunset or just before sunrise where the sky is a brilliant colour of blue. Without going into to too much detail about the proper names or the azimuth of the sun, I want to introduce you to this as it will change how you shoot long exposure/ nighttime photos.

Why is Blue Hour So Special?

The main reason is the colour and the light. Many photographers know that sunsets and sunrises are great. I have seen many pack up and leave once the sun is gone. Also I have seen many head out too late thinking that night photography is better when the sky is pitch black. However, there is a magic to this hour and it should not be ignored.

The reason blue hour is so special is because it is dark which means that water and and car lights will streak and blur. However, it is not too dark so that clouds are still visible not to mention that the sky’s a  deep blue colour adding a lot more interest than just black. This is important for cityscapes and anywhere that there is a bit of pollution.

The one thing to keep in mind is that it only lasts for an hour and realistically even less. So you have to be on the ball and set up if you want to catch it. This also makes it a bit challenging to shoot as you don’t have much time to move around during blue hour.

Also, it should be noted that blue hour during overcast or rainy skies can work as well. As the light fades blue hour will briefly appear even without a visible sun. This means that even if the sunset was disappointing, the blue hour might save the shot. However, if the skies are too dense then of course this will decrease the amount of time for blue and in some cases cause it not to appear at all.

 

 What Can You Shoot?

My personal favourite are cityscapes as the blue hour allows for the lights of the buildings to be on and the cars to leave light trails. Also you still have detail in the sky and that adds a lot to the frame. It is also not too dark meaning that you will also have detail in the darker part of the frame.

Moving water is another great subject as you can keep the definition in the subject areas but you are able to blur the water. This is the key as like with any long exposure you want to have that sense of motion.

 

What you want to get out of the blue hour is really what you want to achieve in a night time shot but with much more colour and detail throughout the image. This is why I love this time so much. You can the longer exposures of night photography but you still keep the colour in the sky.

The long and short of this is basically blue hour is great for buildings and architecture, cityscapes and landscapes and as well as anything with moving objects like cars and amusement park rides.

What Happens if I Miss it?

I would almost always say to make sure that you get there before boue hour. I better approach your be to get set up for the sunrise/sunset and then use the blue hour as a finishing point. That way you are there earlier and you already have a sense of the location.

 

That being said, if you just missed it you can sometimes brighten the sky a bit using a cool graduated filter inside of lightroom. I know that GD filters are pretty sweet but what I mean here is that you cool the temperature down to give a cool colour cast in the sky. This may not always work but it is good to know if you want to attempt to save your shot.

Basic Edits

One of the best things about blue hour photography is the fact that you don’t need to do and heavy editing. Most of the colour is already there. For the example below from Busan, South Korea it only took me a few moments to get this image looking great. I will also be showing how I edited this photo in an up coming tutorial over at learn.jasonteale.com so be sure to look for that.

At any rate, basically this photo was adjusted merely to sharpen and bring out the natural pop of the blue hour. It was shot about 1 stop over to make it a little brighter but that is about it. Drag the slider back and forth to see the difference.

Your Mission… Should You Choose To Accept It

Get out there and shoot some blue hour shots. Play around by increasing your f-stop to get longer exposures. If possible try getting onto a rooftop somewhere and see your city from a new angle. Let me know how you did in the comments below or post your photos in the comment section on my facebook page

The post Making the Best of Blue Hour appeared first on The Sajin.


 

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Weekend Warriors: Daedun Cloud Bridge and Chateau Mani Winery

Koreabridge - Tue, 2017-02-28 03:04
Weekend Warriors: Daedun Cloud Bridge and Chateau Mani Winery


On a Friday night in February, I hopped on a bus from the WinK Taphouse and headed down to the middle of Korea.  WinK has definitely stepped up their food menu game.  I really enjoyed the spicy mac and cheese, which had a real kick to it and plenty of bacon.  The ooey-gooey cheese is what I crave most Friday nights!  You might remember WinK from my tour to Jindo for the Sea-Parting Festival.

 

We arrived in Daejeon around 1 AM.  The group slept at a jimjilbang (bath house and sauna) overnight.  We were up, at ’em, and on the road by 7:20 AM.  After about an hour of driving we made it to Daedun Mountain which has stunning snow-capped mountains, beautiful views, and plenty of tasty Korean food and Makgeolli.  The Daedun Cloud Bridge is a must-see when visiting Korea.  We then went on to visit Chateau Mani.  Young Dong is an area well-known for its grape growing and wine-making.  Some say it’s like the Napa Valley of Korea.

Daedun Mountain and Daedun Cloud Bridge

There are two ways to reach the cloud bridge and vertical stairway.  The tough way is to take the hiking trail which is pretty steep and can take experienced hikers about an hour to an hour and a half.  The easy way (which we took) was the cable car.  I had been hoping to hike, but once we started the trek I thought it would be safer to take the cable car.  The walk from the bus to the cable car was already pretty steep, and with the cold, ice, and about 28 other group members I thought it best to save the hike for another time.  The cable car itself takes you almost right up to the top where there are stairs to the Daedun Cloud Bridge and two lookout points.  After another set of slippery stairs you get to the cloud bridge!

Daedun Cloud Bridge Cable Car Pricing:

Round Trip = 9,000 won (8,500 won if in a group of 30 + people)
One Way = 6,000 won (5,500 won if 30 or more)

Once you cross Daedun cloud bridge you’ll have to go down to make your way back up to the vertical bridge.  From the top of that bridge to the peak is about 30 minutes.  I actually had to slide on my bum to get down from a particularly steep and slippery section, so I avoided that area too this round.  The people who went up to the peak said that it was too foggy to see very much anyway even though it was a clear day.

You can’t skip a chance to have makgeolli (rice wine) and pajeon (savoury panake) when hiking (or taking a cable car to a mountain).  This area is known for it’s chestnut makgeolli.  The flavour is fairly subtle, and after a couple of servings you’ll definitely get a case of the giggles!  At the base of the mountain you’ll find a plethora of restaurants and food stands.  Knowing we’d have lunch at the winery, we chose to just have one order of jeon and then share some tasty hotteok, too.  Hotteok is fried dough filled with brown sugar and, depending on the region, different kinds of nuts or seeds.  This variety had sesame seeds!

Chateau Mani Korean Winery

Apparently this is the same winery to which the wine train will take you!  They make 4 different kinds of wine there and store a plethora of other bottles for people conservatory-style.  The wines are made from grapes grown in the region.  They had a dry white and a dry red which I still found to be quite sweet.  The white wine had an interesting smoky taste that I probably wouldn’t order again.  The dry red was pretty typical cheap-tasting red.  We had a grand time eating, drinking, and chatting away with our new pals.  

Lunch was bbq duck with plenty of side dishes.  Extra wine carafes were KRW 7,000 each.  At that price, everyone was having a toasty time.  Later, we were able to check out Chateau Mani’s tasting room.  There, we sampled some more wines (free of charge) before heading back to Seoul.

Winery Tour and Foot Bath

I actually didn’t do the foot bath this time around because I had already done it in Muju.   We opted to stick around the tasting room.  We  joked around with other members of the tour and our lovely ahjumma hostess who was taking care of our sampling.  The people who did do the foot bath loved it.  They came in and out of the gift shop and tasting area to grab glasses to bring back while soaking.

Like it?  Pin it!  Also make sure to check out the list of all upcoming trips at WinK Travels Facebook and follow The Toronto Seoulcialite for more Korea trip rundowns!

The post Weekend Warriors: Daedun Cloud Bridge and Chateau Mani Winery appeared first on The Toronto Seoulcialite.

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Monday, February 27 Korean News Update

Koreabridge - Mon, 2017-02-27 06:54
Monday, February 27 Korean News Update

President Park Geun-hye will not appear at the final hearing for her impeachment following protests by hundreds of thousands in Seoul over the weekend, no trace of the nerve agent that killed North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s half brother has been found at the airport where he was attacked, China is blocking access to South Korean music & dramas, & women in the ROK are predicted to be the first group in the world to have an average lifespan of more than 90 years. All that & more on the latest Korean News Update podcast from Korea FM.

This episode is brought to you by Podcast Assist & its $30 per hour flat rate podcasting voice overs, editing, mastering, transcriptions & even hosting (select a topic, they’ll create & host the podcast). Visit Facebook.com/PodcastAssist for more information. 

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Interview answers, both in written & audio form, have been edited for length & clarity.

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The post Monday, February 27 Korean News Update appeared first on Korea FM.

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The 7 Worst Guys An Expat Can Date

Koreabridge - Fri, 2017-02-24 15:23
The 7 Worst Guys An Expat Can Date  

Photographer: Dave Meier

We have a tendency to get a little bit lonely living abroad.  Expat dating can be tough!  It’s not always easy to meet someone who speaks English, and if you haven’t been somewhere long then your foreign language skills might not be strong enough for the dating world.  Men we’ve met while living abroad and trying to feign off loneliness haven’t all been bad.  The stereotypes represented are just that, stereotypes and generalizations, so please take this all with a grain of salt and a bit of a laugh.  Before you go locking up your love and throwing away the key, see if you notice any similarities herein.  This is all about the very worst of the worst: The 7 Worst Guys an Expat can Date.

Photographer: Ben White

The Local

This guy just wants to date someone foreign he can show off to his friends.  It’ll be a fleeting romance.  You’ll wonder what exactly you both were thinking.  In Korea, they call this phenomenon “Riding the White Horse”.  I’ll leave you and your imagination to that one.  This isn’t always the case, of course, but as a caucasian woman with blue eyes and blonde hair I’ve found more often than not this type of local’s intentions are pretty transparent, and they’re simply not for me.

Photographer: Taylor L. Spurgeon

The Green (CARD) Monster

This fellow might come from a country with a less than ideal passport situation.  Alternatively, he might have visions of moving to a different country for fame and fortune.  The Green Monster just wants you for your connection to your home and native land, land of hope and glory, or the home of the brave (most likely the latter, in my experience).

Photographer: Amanda Jordan

The Military Man

The Military Man tends to want to settle down.  Being deployed over and over again means he’s a lone wolf.  More often than not he’s “exclusively dating” a few lovely ladies.  They really do want to have their white picket fence and 2.5 kids, but the struggle is real when living in what amount to dorm rooms.  If you find a diamond in the rough, he will be the most loyal, caring gentleman in the world.  The standard review of the Military Man is that he’s a dirty dawg.

Photographer: Frank McKenna

The Eternal Expat

Flitting from city to city and country to country “sampling the local fare”, this guy has found a good life.  Probably considered to be generically attractive from a North American perspective, he’s got a charming personality.  Somewhere down the line he was likely a varsity athlete or fraternity brother.  He’s got natural game and women everywhere swoon.  He’s never settling down in one place, and for him you’ll never been enough.

Photographer: Ben White

The Lifer

Like the Eternal Expat, The Lifer doesn’t want to return home for fear he’ll just never have it as good.  He’s a 6 at home, but a 10 abroad.  Out every night of the week, he’s got a local girlfriend, but still crushes Tinder, Bumble, and OkCupid on the regular.  With expat dates across the city during the week, he’s got a locally-sourced meal every Sunday night.

Photographer: Ben White

The LBH

The LBH or “loser back home” is a nightmare for both expats and travelers alike.  This guy has no social skills, but collects friends like Pokemon cards (note: he’s got a fat stack of those back home, too).  He’s likely well-educated (at least a Bachelor’s degree) and assumes that because he’s foreign (read between the lines here, ladies) he’s got something over the rest of the males in the country.  He’s not picking up the cheque anytime soon (which is fine, but let’s at least go Dutch) because he’s got massive student loans in arrears.  He probably has an acoustic guitar at home and has learned to play all of 3 chords.  Avoid this one like the plague…his friends are way cooler than he.

Photographer: Freestocks.org

The Travel Romance

This one shouldn’t be avoided altogether, but you must know upon entry that your risk of heartbreak is about 90%.  Meeting in vacation mode gives you the opportunity to live without the stress of work and other responsibilities at home.  You both are at your best around one another.  You’re swept up in the bliss of being in a new place with new adventures at every turn.  Give in to the Travel Romance, just don’t give away your heart completely.  It will fly away to the other side of the planet to taunt you with ransom letters every time your time-zones allow you to connect.

Have you had an expat or travel romance which has stood the test of time?  Make sure to leave a comment below!  If you’re in Korea, check out this list of stellar date spots in Seoul.  From the budding romance to a tale as old as time, The Toronto Seoulcialite has got you covered.

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DE POCO UN TODO. 21 Febrero de 2017. Taller de radio ViaRadio. Colegio Sta. Mª del Naranco Alter Via. Oviedo. Asturias. España

Puentes al Mundo - Wed, 2017-02-22 23:52

27:18 minutes (25 MB)

Programa Magacín de 30 minutos.Con Ismael Alba, Cassandra Fernández, Iván Rubio, María Suárez y Daniel Calleja y la coordinación de Nacho Matías.

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